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JAN. 
1912 

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THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 



The articles by Geo. B. Howe, mentioned in the December 
Review, will begin in either the February or March issue. The 
announcement that this series of articles was to be run has caused 
considerable interest, judging by the letters I have received. In 
order not to miss a single issue you should renew promptly, as 
I can make no guarantee of furnishing back numbers. I am well 
pleased with the way my subscribers have renewed so far. 




GEO. B. HOWE, 
Black River, N. Y. 



Mr. Howe needs no introduction to Review readers. Hia 
success in breeding a strain of honey-gatherers is too well known. 
It is not unusual for him to get 200 pounds of comb honey from 
a single colony. Learning how to breed up this strain cost him 
much time zmd money, and now he will tell in detail, in a series 
of articles to appear in the Review in the spring months of 1912, 
just how he does it. You can't afford to miss this series, and 
you may, unless you renew right now. I pledge you my word 
of honor that if you will read the Review for 1912, you will feel 
well repaid for the Dollar invested. 

E. B. TYRRELL. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




No. 1. — We have some extra back 
copies of the American Bee Journal 
for each month of 1911, and so long 
as they last we will send all these 
copies and to the end of 1912 (to 
a new subscriber) for only $1.00. 
This makes two years for the dollar. 
Better send in your dollar at once, 
and take advantage of this offer. It 
surely is a big bargain in bee litera- 
ture that you should accept if not 
now a subscriber. Why not order 
today? 



No. 2.— We have had Mr. C. P. 
Dadant revise Newman's "Bees and 
Honey" book of 160 pages, making 
it now nearly 200 pages, with over 
150 illustrations. It is called "First 
Lessons in Bee-Keeping." Just the 
book for beginners. Bound in strong 
paper cover, with brood-comb illus- 
tration. Price, 50 cents, postpaid ; 
or we will send it (to a new sub- 
scriber) with the American Bee 
Journal from now to the end of 
1912— all for only $1.00. 



Sample copy of the American Bee Journal free. Address, 
GEORGE W. YORK & CO., 117 N. Jefferson St., Chicago, 111. 




THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 



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THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



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DR. BONNEY, 
of Buck Grove, Iowa, 

has been somewhat skeptical 
about much improvement being 
made in bees. He has taken the 
pains to write to leading authori- 
ties about it, and their replies to- 
gether with his conclusions will be 
told in The Review, beginning 
with this issue. - Renew promptly 
so as not to miss a single issue, 
for back numbers can not be 
promised. 



National Bee -Keepers' 
Association 

OBJECTS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



The objects of this Association shall be to 
aid its members in the business of bee-keeping; 
to help in the sale of their honey and beeswax, 
and to promote the interests of bee-keepers in 
any other direction decided upon by the Board 
of Directors. 



OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

President^Geo. W." York, Chicago, 111. 
Vice-Pres. — Morley Pettit, Guelph, Ont. 
Secretary — E. B. Tyrrell, Detroit, Mich. 
Treas.-Gen'l Mgr.— N. E. France, Plattsville, 
Wis. 

DIRECTORS. 

E. D. Townsend, Remus, Mich, 
Wesley Foster, Boulder, Colo. 

F. Wilcox, Mauston, Wis. 

J. E. Crane, Middlebury, Vt. 

J. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn, 



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THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




A MONTHLY JOURNAL 



DEVOTEDTOTHE INTERESTS OF HONEY PRODUCERS 

^i.nn A f par 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editorand Publisher 
Office OF Pu BLicATiON - - - 230 Woodlan d Aven u e 

VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 1, 1912. No. 1. 

Improvement of the Bee — The Present Status of 

the Question. 

DR. A. F. BONNEY 

■^ AKING up bee keeping, I brought to the study of the little 

^j animals a mind trained to study and observation, and it was 

not long before it appeared to me that there was a vast field 

' srill unexplored, and as "Fools rush in where angles fear to tread," 

I began to pry into the secrets of the family .-l/^is. 

Failing to get results which would compare with other experi- 
ments in biology and selection and breeding, it early appeared to me 
that parthenogenesis was a disturbing factor, as is our inability to 
control mating in other than isolated stations. There are such 
places, but in them we find no natural bee pastures to tempt the 
bee-keeper. I saw such in the N. E. corner of S. Dakota last 
fall, a large stretch of country where a honey-bee has never been 
seen, as there is no clover and no trees. Finally I decided to get the 
opinion of students of biology, experimental evcilution, heredity and 
bees. 

Before submitting the letters I liave received, I wish to ol^serve 

that it appears to me less work has been done with the bee than any 

^ other animal we know, for it was not until Father Langstroth had 

•^ made bee keeping a commercial possibility that we l^egan to think 

— of improving our breeds of bees, and all the efforts in that direction 

>j)^ seemed at first bent to produce a non-swarming bee. Later, atten- 

• tion has been directed to securing working bees of a good disposi- 

^ tion which will be hardy in our trying climate, and while a few men. 

'") as Prof. Phillips, and others, seem to have secured results, the tact 

remains that about ninety-nine per cent of bee-keepers have failed 



1 ^Y 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



to make any gains. Man has produced breeds of horses, cows, pigs, 
dogs and birds which breed true to type, but we cannot say as much 
about the bees, especially when it conies to that prime essential, 
"hustle." Is it due to parthenogenesis, or is it because the bees are 
wild by nature? Shall we find that Mendelism is a factor of study? 
Is Mother Nature, regardless of man's efforts, slowly and surely 
developing an American Bee, just as in the ages past she has giveri 
us the Italian ? To save room for something more important than 
what I think — for I believe but little — I here offer the correspond- 
ence between myself and men very prominent in their fields: — 

Professor W. M. Wheeler, Sept. 11, 1911. 

Boston, Mass. 
Dear Sir: — 

I wrote Prof. MacDougal, of the Carnegie Institution, who is, as 
you probably know, in charge of the Desert Laboratory, asking for 
information as to what we may expect to gain in the family Apis 
by selection and breeding. He replied : "* * * * ''^ I shrink from 
attempting to answer your question off-hand," and refers me to you. 

In the bee journals of late have been many heavy (?) and learned 
disquisitions a non-swarming, a long-tongued, and, laterly, an im- 
proved strain of bees, basing claims almost entirely on the fact that 
we have been able to add a couple of yellow rings to the original 
three on the abdomen of the Italian bee. Even an authority like 
Prof. E. F. Phillips, of the Department of Apiculture, Washington, 
says, p. 1.1:5, Bee-Keepers' Review, May, 1911, "When we see what 
has been done in breeding five-banded Italians we are forced to the 
conclusion that it is possible to change the bee by breeding. If we 
could but devise a method for control of mating, progress would be 
more rapid. The five-banded bee did not exist in the days of Sam- 
son's exploit with the Leo bar-frame hive, and it is probable that 
before as many centuries pass again some further changes in the 
bee may be seen." 

I am ordering a copy of this issue of the Review sent to you, 
that you may see the article from which this is copied. 

I have always been of the opinion that the bee is the most highly 
specialized animal alive, and that all progress, change or improve- 
ment ceased ages ago. If I am wrong in this, I wish to try to de- 
velop a strain or breed of bees which will be good honey gatherers, 
reasonably gentle, and hardy in this climate, but so long as it is 
not convenient to control male parentage (though in the Dakotas, 
where I lately spent some time, there are millions of acres which 
never saw a bee, treeless, flowerless plains where mating can be 
controled perfectly, I think), and a generation of worker bees is 
but forty (40) days, of a queen three or four years and a drone two 
or three months how may we begin? We bee keepers have been 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 9 

importing- Italian queens for half a century, and so far as I can see 
we still have nothing but Italian bees, and so far as I can see can- 
not point to a single advantage gained, notwithstanding the claims 
set up by some writers. I am not criticizing belief, which proves 
nothing, but unsubstantiated claims. I want to know ; more for the 
bee-keeping world than myself. 

Is any improvement in the bee to be looked for, even if we can 
control the mating? 

Prof. 'MacDougal concludes his reply with : "Theoretically almost 
anything biological is capable of alteration, but how such an idea 
might work out practically with regards to the bees is a puzzling 
question." 

Is the bee biologically the dandelion of the insect world, a per- 
fect type? 

Any reply you may see fit to make to this letter will be thank- 
fully received. Respectfully yours, 

A, F. BONNEY. 

September U, 1911. 
Dr. A. F, Bonney, Buck Grove, Iowa. 
My Dear Sir: — 

Replying to your interesting letter of the 11th inst., I would say 
that my little experience with the honey bee leads me to believe 
that there is no inherent reason why it should not be capable of 
considerable modification through experimental breeding. I believe, 
however, that much headway cannot be made until it is possible 
accurately to control the mating of the queens and drones. Of 
course, if there are great stretches of country in which bees are 
lacking, it would be possible to obtain satisfactory results in the 
open. Mr. Wilmon Newell, State Entomologist of Texas, who was 
working with me here this summer, is much interested in honey 
bees and is endeavoring to make attempts along this line, that is, 
in crossing pure Italians with members of other races from hives 
very much isolated, so as to preclude the influence of stray drones 
of unknown origin. Of course, the honey bee is an extremely highly 
specialized insect but not more so than many of the solitary bees, 
and the vast number of species of the latter (probabh' some oOOO 
in the United States alone!), often very closely related to one an- 
other, shows that the group is still very plastic and probably un- 
dergoing active species formation. This is my main reason for 
believing that the honey bee is not a form which has reached the 
end of its development but that it may have a future before it. It 
is, of course, not impossible that someone may invent a method of 
artificially impregnating the queens of honey bees. So many very 
delicate operations have been performed on insects lately that we 



10 THE BEE-KEF.PERS' REVIEW 

may look forward to something of this kind. In that event it would 
imdoubtedl}^ be possible to make very considerable modifications 
in the races of honey bees. 

I do not know whether these points are of any interest to you 
but if I have not made myself ])erfectly clear I should be glad to 
write you further. Yours very sincerely, 

W. M. Wheeler. 

[Dr. Bonney's letter to Prof. Newall was along the same lines 
as the one given above to Prof. AMieeler, so we will not reproduce 
it here. — Ed.] 

College Station, Texas, Oct. 20, 1911. 
Dr. A. F. Bonney, Buck Grove, Iowa. 
Dear Sir: 

I feel honored by the receipt of your letter of the oth instant, 
and the first thing I must do in replying is to express regret that 
I cannot give you the information you desire. 

I have been interested in bees all of my life but as to investi- 
gation of inheritance in the honey bee I have done nothing, so far, 
other than to study the problem and to plan for a few experiments. 

During this summer I spent two months at the Bussey Institu- 
tion, Forest Hills, Massachusetts, studying under Prof. Wheeler 
and under Dr. W. E. Castle, professor of genetics and experimental 
evolution. The information that I gained there relative to the 
methods of breeding led me to believe that it is possible to find out 
what characters in the honey bee are transmitted according to the 
Mendelian scheme. I will have to determine, first of all, what char- 
acters of the honey bee are really Mendelian and will thereafter 
have to find out by experiment just how these characters act in 
inheritance. Genetics, as you are doubtless already aware, is a sci- 
ence which has developed within the last ten years, and it is noth- 
ing more or less than the elaboration of the ]\Iendelian law. 

So far as I know, there has been practically no a])plication of 
genetics in the case of the honey bee, but the numerous instances 
in the case of other animals and insects in which characters are 
transmitted according to a definite mathematical plan, and the man- 
ner in which mutations can be fixed and made permament charac- 
ters leads me to believe that similar work can be done with the 
honey bee. The honey bee, however, presents, perhaps, a more 
complicated problem than any of those yet studied by the genetic 
experts, owing to the fact that parthenogenesis is involved. 

There is a very interesting general write-up on the work in 
genetics at the Bussey Institution in the July, 1911, Technical World 
Magazine, page 513. I am sending you my copy of this magazine 
under separate cover and would request that after reading the ar- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 11 

tide in question you return it to me. This article is of a very 
popular nature and therefore it is not absolutely correct in every 
respect from a scientist's standpoint. 

Another recent work which gives a very accurate and compre- 
hensive view of the science of genetics is entitled "^^lendelism," by 
R. C Punnett, published by ^McMillan & Company, Xew York, price 
$1.25. Another book, by Dr. ^^'. E. Castle, bearing some such title 
as '"Inheritance and Its Relation to Animal Breeding," is now in 
press by D. Appleton & Company. Xew York, and this book. I have 
no doubt, will set forth the principles of genetics and experimental 
breeding in as clear a manner as the book of Punnett's. 

If you are interested in work of this character I would suggest 
that you get these two books and though neither one of them will 
give you any facts regarding honey bees, they will indicate the gen- 
eral plans and principles which we must follow, or rather which 
we may expect to follow if accomplishing anything in the improve- 
ment of the honey bee. 

I have no doubt that distinct mutations occur in the case of 
bees as in other animals and plants. I have often wondered whether 
the first colony of long-tongued red clover bees were not really 
mutations in which an abnormally long tongue was present. It 
seems to be the opinion of bee keepers that this strain has largely 
"run out,' but I believe had the science of genetics been understood 
at the time the first colony of these was discovered the character 
could have been fixed and made permanent. 1 see no reason for 
not believing that mutations in the nature of color may not occur, 
and if they do occur I am satisfied that it will only take a few gen- 
erations of breedmg to make these color characteristics permanent. 

Dr. Bonney has taken much pains to get the opinions of authori- 
ties on this question. Possibly we have been expecting too much in 
the way of an improved bee. The article will be concluded in the 
Februarv issue. 



Boiling Honey Used in Queen Cages Not Sufficient. 

A Subscriber's Letter and Editor E. R. Root's Reply. 
A. E. BURDICK 

-•^Jl X Gleanings for September 1.5th. 1011, E. R. Root advises all 
^11 queen-breeders to boil their honey used in their queen mailing 
cages, and conveys the idea that that is the one essential 
thing to do in order not to spread foul brood by means of the mail- 
ing cages, to the purchasers of queens, and further he is willing, in 
a measure, to vouch for all queen breeders who will take the pre- 
caution to boil all honey used in their queen mailing cages. 



12 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Now I wish to say that no greater blunder could be perpetrated 
than to work from that standpoint alone. In order to make my 
position clear let us consider briefly the nature of foul brood. 1st, 
It is disease of the larval state of the bee; 2nd, it is communicable 
from one colony to another; 3rd, a specific bacillus has been iso- 
lated and proven to be the essential cause of American foul brood. 
In other words we have an infectious and possibly contagious dis- 
ease of the infant bee. 

QUARANTINE. 

Now on what basis do all civilized communities act in order to 
prevent the spread of infectious and contagious diseases? And 
what method alone has proven effective? Only one, and that is 
rigid quarantine. 

When an individual is quarantined because of some contagious 
disease only such persons, who, by virtue of special training, know 
how to render their clothing and person absolutely aseptic are per- 
mitted to see him. 

My contention is that no queen breeder ought to be permitted 
to mail queen bees or otherwise transport them who has foul brood 
in his yard or in his immediate vicinity. I will admit that queen 
breeders could qualify themselves so as to send queens from a 
foul brood yard without danger to the purchasers, but what are 
the essential things that he must rigidly adhere to in order to do so 
with safety to the queen buyer? First, he must know how to be 
surgically clean himself. He must know how to make his cage 
honey sterile, and how to keep it in that condition, and how to ren- 
der the cage, queen and attendants aseptic. Further, he must keep 
every tpol, object, container, and in fact everything, including the 
building in which he works, free from this bacillus larvae by means 
of heat or chemical disinfectants. It would take the special training 
of a nurse or surgeon to qualify for the place and queens could not 
be profitably handled under prevailing prices. 

There is only one safe course, and that is to quarantine all 
queen breeders who have foul brood near them. 

FOTTIi BROOD ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

The season of 1910 saw foul brood for the first time in the 
Yakima Valley and I am informed that it is spreading rapidly over 
the Pacific States. The old adage that "an ounce of prevention is 
worth a pound of cure" is very pertinent in this connection. But 
if we blunder along with the fanciful idea that the queen breeder 
who boils his honey for his queen cages, with foul brood present 
in his yard has done his full duty we are closing our eyes to all 
that science has laboriously learned regarding the prevention of 
communicable diseases. Methods of preventing the spread of foul 
brood is of the greatest importance to bee-keepers, and the assump- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 13 

tion that honey alone can convey the germ is contrary to all facts 
relative to other infectious agents. Honey is not a good culture 
medium for any bacteria. The most that can be said is that its 
adhesive qualities would be likely to carry whatever bacteria found 
lodgment in it. 

GREAT CARE NEEDED. 

This fact can not be too strongly emphasized, viz. : that honey 
could be sterilized by boiling and five minutes later contaminated by 
careless handling in a place where bacteria were present. If it is to 
remain sterile every article wnth which it comes in contact must 
likewise be sterile. Hence it follows that it is well nigh impossible 
for' a queen-breeder with foul brood in his yard not to spread the 
infection if permitted to send queens through the mails, and here 
again let me repeat that our safety lies in having regulations 
analogous to quarantine enforced against foul broody queen 
breeders. 

Mabton, A\'ashington. 

EDITOR E. R. ROOT'S REPLY 

I have carefully read that article on page 56-1: of Gleanings for 
Sept. 15, to which Air. Btirdick replies, as well as the article above ; 
but nowhere in my article do I find a statement or set of state- 
ments that convey the idea (to me, at least) that the boiling of the 
honey for queen-cage candy "is the one essential thing to do in 
order not to spread foul brood by means of the mailing-cages to the 
purchasers of queens." On the other hand, I do find that I men- 
tion fz^'O essentials; first, boiling the honey; second, to discard candy 
that the queen came with, and use the push-in-the-cage-comb plan 
to introduce. We will assume that Mr. Queen-breeder boiled the 
honey he used for making candy, and then reinfected it. If the 
queen were transferred into a cage that did not have any infected 
candy, there will be small probability that the infection would be 
transmitted. Furthermore, it seems to me it w^ould be understood 
that any one who would feel or see the necessity of boiling the 
honey would, as a matter of course, take the precaution to prevent 
reinfection. 

AVhile I do not plead guilty as charged, I do n'lost heartily in- 
dorse what Air. Burdick says when he emphasizes the importance 
of preventing the reinfection of candy once sterile, and that no 
queen-breeder should send queens from an infected apiary. I wall 
join hands with him or any one else on this propaganda; and if I 
did not put sufficient emphasis on these two propositions, I thank 
him for the correction. But some queen-breeder, not knowing he 
had disease, might inadvertently send out infected candy; and hence 
the importance of boiling all honey that is used in making candy, 
and the importance, also, of not using the candy method of intro- 



14 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

ducing. This, you see, friend Burdick, puts a double check on the 
possible spread of the disease through the candy. 

E. R. Root. 

[As long as we have bee-keepers we will have queen-breeders. 
Just as long as we have queen-breeders we will have some who will 
send queens from an infected apiary. I am satisfied that foul brood 
has been scattered more than we know simply through the queen 
business. 

Now the Review wants to go on record as saying that under no 
circumstances should a queen ever he introduced into a colony by using 
the cage she came in as an introdncing cage. If we can make it plain 
that the cage is dangerous, and then get after the breeder who has 
foul brood in his apiary, we can do much to check the spread of this 
disease. The danger of advising queen breeders to boil their honey 
lies in the fact that the inexperienced buyer is apt to think that 
precaution is all that is necessary, although I fully understand that 
Editor Root meant it as only an additional precaution.] 



79,000 Pounds of Honey From 587 Colonies of Bees. 

OLIVER FOSTER 

^"4 OUR request for particulars concerning the jear in which I 
V/ made the most money out of bees, reminds me that just now 
^ my most vivid impressions are from the year in which I lost 
the most money in bees— the year just past. Pfowever, it is more 
agreeable to dwell upon and study the conditions of success than 
those of failure. 

A rummage through my old account books reveals the fact that 
the year 1900 was my most profitable year. 

I had 587 colonies Jan. 1, 1900, and ()25 Jan. 1, 1901, showing an 
increase of 66 colonies. They were located in five apiaries in Bent 
County, Colorado, in the Arkansas Valley. 

We have harvested 79,000 pounds of honey. All Init about 1,000 
pounds was extracted. Wax was sold to the amount of $191.50, 
besides a lot that went into comb foundation. 

FECUIiIAR CONDITIONS. 

What were the peculiar conditions that enabled us to secure 
such a wonderful result? Well, in the first place, we had a good 
honey fiow, mostly from alfalfa and chome. The bees were worked 
on the same system as had been followed in the "Arkansas X'allcy 
Apiaries'' for several years before, and which has been practiced 
there by my successors, Clark and Wallinger, ever since. 

The bees were in ten frame standard L size hives, with an 
average of about three extra bodies containing nine combs each, for 
the surplus. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 15 

SYSTEM OF MANAGEMENT. 

\\'e will start with the colony in one story, which has served as 
its winter quarters. As soon as this is nearly full of brood, we lift, 
say half of the brood to the center of an added story above, filling 
vacancies at each side in each story with empty combs. 

This first move leaves nine combs in each story, spaced to 
occupy the ten-frame body, with the brood in the center of each 
story. 

At our next visit, or within two or three weeks, owing to con- 
ditions, having been the round of all the apiaries as above, we start 
around again, working that apiary that seems farthest advanced 
first, as follows : 

There is now more danger of the swarming impulse, which we 
wish to head ofif before it develops. It is also warmer weather and 
we can safely practice more drastic measures. 

From each colony that has its two stories nearly full of brood 
and honey, we set aside, upon a temporary bottom board, the upper 
story, then lift the lower story from its bottom and place it over 
the other ; place an empty body on the old stand and proceed to 
rearrange the combs in it by placing next, to the far side two 
empty combs, then two combs with brood from the colony, bees 
and all, then two empties, then two more of brood, then last, one 
empty comb next to the near side. The "empties'' are either dry 
or dauby combs from the storehouse or light and broodless combs 
from the colony. We then place on another body and fill it m like 
manner, and then a third body, or as many as the brood in the 
colony will furnish. If the brood combs do not come out even, we 
place two, three or five in the last body on top. and usually add 
another body on top of that to take whatever combs of honey are 
left, together with enough empties to fill out. 

TIERING UP. 

This is what we might call an extreme application of the tiering 
up and tiering out principle. Xo excluder is used. No attention is 
paid to the whereabouts of the queen. No bees are shaken. The 
colony is virtually divided into many two-frame nuclei, each sur- 
rounded l>y empty comli, and all under the charge of one queen and 
one colony. Any inclination to swarm is at once supplanted by the 
strongest impulse to restore things to their normal relation to each 
other, and to fill up the many vacancies throughout the colony, for 
bees, like nature in general, "abhor a vacuum." 

The queen abandons the upper and outer combs of brood, and 
selects a central location around which she establishes her future 
brood nest, while the bees fill with honey all surrounding empty 
combs, including those vacated b^- hatching brood. 



16 THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 

EXTRACTING. 

The next move is usually a round at extracting, after two or 
three weeks, when all the upper combs are well filled with ripe 
honey. However, if we are not ready to extract, and if we have a 
surplus of empties still on hand, we repeat the last operation, run- 
ning many colonies up to five stories. If their contents furnish 
more than five stories, we prefer to divide the colony rather than 
run it up higher. 

Much of our extracting was done after the flow. AA'e suit our 
convenience about doing it before. 

How and where was this honey marketed? It was all sold di- 
rectly to consumers or to retailers, and shipped by local freight 
from our station at Las Animas, excepting wdiat was sold at home. 
The details as to how this was accomplished will be reserved for 
another article. 

Boulder, Colorado. 



A Subscriber's Experience with the Italian Bee- 
Louse. 

HENRY L. JEFFREY 

' ■ Jl RECEIVED my December Review on the 5 :30 mail this even- 

Jjl ing, and opened it about G :30 at page 339, and my eye caught 

the question, "Is there danger of the Italian bee-louse in 

America?" To use a slang phrase, "you bet there is," and there 

was way back in 1S81 and 1882. 

Several of us bee-keepers obtained imported queens direct from 
Italy, in the importing hives of that day and time, and we all bought 
the crabs with them, and all of the queens were infected. Each of 
us had from two to six of the queens, and each of us got one or 
more queens that were carriers of the red crai)s, and to reall}- enjoy 
the beauty of them you should have a few of them get onto your 
hands or into your hair and then you will know just how really good 
it is to have them in the apiary. 

A REMESV. 

Years before that I had been a tancy-poultry breeder, and by an 
accidental chance when I had been handling some setting hens that 
were alive with that little silver spider called the mife or hen- 
louse, I dipped my hands in a barrel of rain water near the hen- 
house door and found out that it was poison to the hen spider. So 
I tried it for that bee-louse and they could not live in it. Having 
them in my hair and on my hands, I gave my head a thorough soak- 
ing and got rid of them. Then I caged the queens and a few bees 
that had the spiders on them and drowned them in good style. 
Thev w^ere soaked in the water fifteen minutes or more. I then 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 17 

placed them in other cages, although they looked as dead as dead 
could be, but in the warm sunshine they dried off and became as 
lively as ever. I then soaked some of the hives, combs, bees and 
brood with very satisfactory results. In other hives 1 caught all 
the vermine on thin narrow strips of raw lean beef. I know other 
bee-keepers who used good old-fashioned home-cured strips of raw 
salt pork with as satisfactory results. 

Another remedy that I found to l)e very good was to smoke the 
bees until they were apparently nearly dead, give them a good 
soaking shower bath with the watering pot, fill the hives with clear 
tobacco smoke, close . it up and let them come out of it at their 
leisure. Use no rags or wood to smoke either bees or hives. Use 
only clear tobacco. The stems of tobacco will answer. 

THE £GGS HATCH IN THBEi: DAYS. 

The eggs of the vermin hatch in three days, so on the fourth 
day give the second dose of tobacco smoke, and if properly done 
the vermin are done out also. 

I hastened to answer your article so you can use it to help the 
sufferers, and use it in the January Review. Not quite all of the 
bee-keepers of the "way back sixties'" are dead. I'm one of those 
kid-beginners who has seen just forty years of the bee-business. 

Woodbury, Conn. 

[I must confess that some of the remedies proposed above look 
rather strenuous. Catching the lice on the strips of meat look to 
me to be the most humane, if it only gets the results. 

I wonder, however, just how dangerous this louse business is. 
With the importations going on to such an extent it seems that we 
would have heard more complaint if there was much danger. 
However, it is well that we should know about it, and how to get 
rid of it if it does appear. As stated in the December number, it is 
a new one to me.] 



Using an Automobile in the Bee Business. 

ISAAC BALMER 

^■^OU ask me to write you an explanation regarding those two 
V^ photos that I showed you at Toronto. The car is a 2-cylin- 
^ der, 24-h. p., 5-passenger Jackson touring car. model D, ■$"?800. 
The body is fastened to the frame with four bolts which are easily 
removed. The body is hoisted with block and tackle in the barn 
and allowed to hang there until it is wanted for a little pleasure. 
A flat Lorry body is put on when required for conveying bee sup- 
plies to and from the out-yards. One picture shows the last load of 
planer shavings that I passed through Burlington with, on my way 
to the out-yard to pack my bees for winter. They are wintered 



18 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




Getting the Supers there on Time. 



lour colonies in a case in one straight row. In the spring" the 
cover, sides and ends are taken down and stored in piles until 
needed in the fall. The colonies are not removed from the bottom 
of the winter case, which is made of dressed flooring, nailed on to 
2x-i scantling on edge. 

The other picture represents a load of extracting supers ready 
to leave home for the out-apiary. Thi*^ motor has power to take 
any sized load I have a mind to put on, l)ut it is not" safe to pile 
on more than eight or ten hundred ])oun(ls, for the benefit of the 




The Bees Need Protection. We Must Hurry with these Planer Shavings. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



19 



tires, which must be always taken into consideration when loading. 
I made the Lorry body myself. I can hoist the passenger body, 
take off the Lorry body, or put it on alone, or change the one for 
the other, in less than half an hour. The advantages that an auto 
has over a horse is, that when using a horse for out-yards, a per- 
son is so long on the road and then if obliged to leave his horse so 
far away from the bees, that it makes a lot of hard work carrying 
everything to and from the wagon and very often wait until dark to 
do some work. An auto can be run up close, emptied or loaded 
any time of day. 

Burlington, Ontario. 



A Honey-House Arranged to Save Time and Labor. 

H. F. HART. 

'^^^ WENTY-FIVE years ago I had an apiary on a side hill. I 
L^ built my honey-house on the low side, making the floor in 
two levels. The extracting was done on the highest level, 
the honey flowing from the extractor and uncapping tank to a stor- 
age tank below, and when the honey had become sufficiently clear 
in the storage tank it was drawn off in barrels. These barrels were 
rolled out of the honey-house door direct into the bed of a wagon, 
and there was no lifting from first to last. 



j._V 



n\ \ a \ \ \ \ 



\ \ \ \ :t 
v \ \ \ ,\ 



-y^^'yT^ N- 



\ \ 







The Wheel-barrow Brings Up the Honey. Gravity Takes it Down. 



20 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



I have built several honey-houses since and when unable to get 
the required fall in the land. I have had the house tloor in two 
levels running' a wdieel-barrow track to the extracting floor, as I 
find it much less labor rolling a wdieelbarrow up a slight ascent 
than the continual attention watching the gates of the extractor and 
uncapping tank. 

The storage tank that 1 have used holds about GO to To gallons, 
and is made w'ith a wire cloth screen (removable), fitting into the 
top. bee tight, and over that a length of cheese cloth is laid that 
can easily be removed and cleaned. The storage tank is long enough 
so that both extractor and uncapping tank drain into it. The sketch 
will give you some idea of the arrangement. 

Allenville. Alabama. 



A Combined Bottom Board and Feeder. 

W. A. CHRYSLER 

^J^^ HE bottom board which you saw at the Toronto convention 
V J was designed to be used both as a bottom board and feeder. 
You will notice that it also provides a vestibule, which is an 
important addition for outdoor wintering. The bottom board's con- 
struction is also such that it does not need to project out in front 
of the hive, thus allowing the hives to be packed close together in 
case it is necessary to load them on a wagon for moving. 

Bv referring to cut number one, you get a side view of the 
bottom board, with part removed, showing the feed draw, and also 
the two entrances — one the bees take in getting in and out of the 
hive, and the other in getting to the feed. 

By referring to cut number two. you see the feed draw partly 
drawn out. ready to receive the feed. This draw is lined with heavy 
building paper to hold the feed. 

Cut number three shows the bottom board complete, with both 
entrances and also the removable board in front, to close the vesti- 
bule, allowinij but the one entrance showni at the bottom, and the 







OutsiDf tnr^ANte 



Number One. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



21 




Number Two. 



Number Three, 



two shown at the top. By reversing- the board it reduces the en- 
trances to two. and for summer use the board is to be removed 
entirely. 

By a little study of the cuts the construction will be clear to all. 

Chatham. Ont. 



A Puzzling Question Regarding a Queen. 

DR. JAMES W. COWAN. 

'^•jf' AST spring- I bought out a little apiary and found it neces- 
jL . sary to transfer the bees to other hives as the combs were 
built almost every way. The process of transferring was 
accomplished in the way described by ]\fr. Townsend of ^Michigan, 
and was without special incident except in the case of hive Xo. 14. 
which certainly has done some unexpected things this summer. I 
will give you a complete history of the case. 

On IMay 10th I placed a full depth ten-frame body filled with wet 
drawn combs on the old hive. The queen was found above and 
laying nicely on the IGth, and on the 2Uth I lifted the upper story 
off carefully, adjusted an excluder over the old brood nest and set 
the upper story in which the queen was laying back on again. June 
2nd I added another story with drawn combs, as the bees had put 
enough honey in to make me think I was going to get a whale of a 
crop this year. Thus you see the hive at this' date comprised the 
old brood chamber and two full depth hive bodies. 

On the evening of June the 10th I smoked the bees pretty 
thoroughly at the entrance, and rattled on the hive to drive as many 
as possible above, and lifted the two upper bodies off onto a new 
bottom board and carried the old hive to the upper yard, about one- 
half mile away. Next day I cut out the old combs from the old 
hive, landing enough good combs to fill three frames, as well as 
about a quart of bees but no brood. These I placed in a new hive 
together with a drawn comb and division board, and gave them an 



22 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

untested Italian queen received through the mail. Before placing 
the queen in the hive I punctured a hole about half way through 
the queen candy in the cage to enable the bees, seeing they were 
so few, to liberate the queen a little sooner. In a week I looked 
for the queen but failed to find her and I am sure I made a thorough 
examination. 

I gave them another queen ; this time, however, leaving the 
candy just as it was in the cage. When I looked for the second 
queen a week later she had disappeared just as the first one had. I 
looked over every frame, in every corner of the hive as well as out 
on the alighting board but could find nothing to indicate a queen 
ever had been in the hive. I concluded I'd spend no more good 
greenbacks on that hive so gave them a frame of eggs and brood 
from a Caucasian colony, but they built no cells, so I took a frame 
from another full-blooded Caucasian hive with two fine cells and 
gave that to them, and found both cells torn open in a couple of 
days and the baby queens thrown out the front door. 

By this time I was pretty sick of the whole outfit but hated to 
give up the job I had started, so a couple of days later I went at 
them again to see if there were any indications of a laying worker, 
and while doing this my eye caught a little bit of a runty bee, 
smaller than the average worker, but with the unmistakable outline 
of a queen. I captured her and after a good look to satisfy myself 
there could be no mistake about her being a queen, I nipped her 
head ofif. Then I gave them another frame of brood from a Cau- 
casian colony, intending to unite them later with a couple of the 
weaklings and make one good colony out of the lot for winter. 

August 14th I had to go away for a couple of weeks and was so 
busy on my return that it was the 5th of September before I looked 
into the hive again. I noticed they were taking pollen into the hive 
but thought it only another indication of freakishness, but imagine 
my surprise on opening the hive to find three of the finest frames 
of sealed brood you ever saw in your life, as well as a few young 
yellow Italian bees hatched out. and also there were plenty of eggs 
and larva, and parading over the combs in a most workmanlike 
fashion was a dandy Italian queen. Now will you tell me, please, 
where in Sam Hill that queen came from? I can't see how I could 
have missed her if she is one of the first two I tried to introduce, 
and if she is one of these, why didn't she put the little hybrid runt 
out of business? It may be that a young queen from some other 
hive made a mistake and got into the wrong pen, and that is the 
only solution of the puzzle I can figure out. 

Geneseo, N. Y. 

[I'll give it up. Doctor. Possibly some of my subscribers can 
solve the problem.] 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 23 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editor and Publisher 
Office — 230 AVoodland Ave., Detroit, Michisan. 

Entered as second-class matter, Julv 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1S79. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico. Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Discontinuances — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. .\t the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

Aflvertislng^ rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



Opportunity. 

They do me wrong who say I come no more. 

When once I knock and fail to find you in. 
For every morn I stand outside your door 

And l)id vou wake, to rise, to fiaht and win. 



Practical Information for Beginners in Bee-Keeping. 

Texas has just issued Bulletin Xo. 142 under the abo\e heading. 
It contains -4:8 pages and many illustrations. The Bulletin is written 
by Wilmon Xewall, State Entomologist, and can be had by address- 
ing- Agricultural College. College Station, Brazos Co., Texas. It is 
issued in the interests of the beginner in bee-keeping, and among 
other things advises membership in both the State and National 
Bee-Keepers' Associations. The names and addresses of both Sec- 
retaries are eiven. 



Annual Meeting of Oklahoma Bee-Keepers. 

This will be held at Stillwater, at the A. and M. college. Pro- 
gram as follows : 

Wednesday night. Jan. lUh — Address with m(»\'ing pictures. 
Prof. C. E. Sanborn. 

Tuesday, Jan. 18th, !) a. m. — President's address. Business 
meeting and election ; 1 ::30 p. m. — "How Location and Pasturage 
Affect Successful Bee-keeping," J. H. Burrage : "\\'hv We Should 
Tie to the Association.*' Geo. H. Coulson ; "The Use of Feeders." 
G. E. Lemon: "\\'hat I think about Foul Brood," Arthur Rhoades; 
"Growth of the Bee Industry in Oklohoma.'' P'. W. \'an DeMark. 
r)uestion l^ox and <'eneral discussion. 



24 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Honey Plants of California. 

This is the name of Bulletin No. 217, written by i\I. C. Richter, 
and published by the College of Agriculture, Berkely, Cal. It con- 
tains 72 pages, with Irt illustrations. It gives a thorough treatise 
on the honey flora of California, together with important tables, and 
should be in the hands of every California bee-keeper. I believe it 
is for free distribution, and is the iirst l^ulletin of its kind ever 
issued in California. 

Short Course in Bee-Keeping. 

'Morley Pettit, Provincial Apiarist, is pushing the bee industry in 
Ontario. I had the pleasure of meeting him for the first time at the 
Toronto convention, and found him an enthusiast in his work. 
Backed by the Ontario Agricultural College, he is doing much to 
further the bee interests in Ontario. 

Last year a successful short course in bee-keeping was held at 
the College, and this is to be repeated this year. The course begins 
January 9th, and lasts two weeks. Tuition is free, but board will 
cost the student from $3.50 to $4.50 per week. 



Miscellaneous Papers on Apiculture. 

Bulletin No. 75, issued l)y the Bureau of h^ntomology, Washing- 
ton, D. C, l)ears the above heading. This bulletin contains the 
following : Production and Care of Extracted Honey, by E. F. 
Phillips, Ph. D. ; Methods of Honey Testing for Bee-keepers, by 
C. A. Browne, Ph. D. ; Wax Moths and American Foul Brood, by 
E. F. Phillips, Ph. D. ; Bee Diseases in 'Massachusetts, by Burton 
N. Gates; The Relation of Etilogy (cause) of Bee Diseases to the 
Treatment, by G. F. White, Ph. D. ; A Brief Survey of Hawaiian 
Bee-keeping, by E. F. Phillips, Ph. D. ; The Status of Apiculture in 
the United States, by E. F. Phillips, Ph. D. ; Bee-keeping in Massa- 
chusetts, by Burton N. Gates. 

The Bulletin contains 124 pages and co\'er, and contains many 
interesting illustrations. A map showing the territory infected with 
both American and European foul brood in ^Massachusetts will be 
especially interesting to bee-keepers in that state. 



Plans for the National. 

Yes, the new constitution has passed. This means that the plan 
of organization is completely revised. The old plan provided for 
one organization with no branches. The new plan provides for one 
central organization with branches all over the United States and 
Canada. These branches will elect delegates, and these delegates 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 25 

so elected will make and change the laws, elect officers, and have 
general charge of the business. 

No branch is required to send delegates unless they so desire. 
Each delegate so sent has one vote for every fifty members, or 
fraction thereof belonging to his branch. This gives every member 
a direct representation. 

Just what the work will be for this year has not been decided on. 
The directors have not yet met. as they do not go into office until 
Januarv first. I expect that they will meet soon after that date. 
Full plans will be given as soon as decided upon. 

Remember, that after January 1st, membership in the National is 
$1.50 per year, one-third, or 50c, going to the local branch Avherever 
such is organized. 

Turn the Leaf, Boys, Turn the Leaf. 

Are you discouraged? Has the past year brought you more 
than your share of misfortunes? Have you tried and failed? Have 
those near and dear to you said: "I told you so?'' Did you fail 
to get that honey crop you expected? Has disease attacked your 
bees? Are you about ready to give up? 

Then turn the leaf, and do it quickly. You don't give a rap 
about what happened last year. It is this year that interests you. 
What are you going to do this year? 

The world is bigger than ever. It hasn't shrunk a bit. It is 
\ibrating with groiving pains. There is a bigger place than ever for 
you. It is up to you to fill it. Your problem isn't one of existence, 
but of persistence. Keep your grip and you'll succeed. In fact, you 
haven't failed at all — you have simply been delayed. You are not a 
failure until you yourself admit it. Are you going to admit it? 

The bumps you had last year are simply to test your metal. Old 
mother nature decided to give you a jolt. If she hadn't you might 
have gone on in your own little way to the end. It is good for 3^ou 
to be backed up against the wall. You must either tight or get 
•z^'liipped. It may be the first time you ever knei^' you could fight. 
Go to it, boys, go to it. 

Irrigation Opens Up New Fields. 

In the last issue I gave a clipping taken from one of the Detroit 
newspapers, regarding what the Government was doing to advertise 
the bee business. There has since come to hand what I presume 
vv^as the original article sent out by the Department of the Interior, 
AA'ashington, D. C. We are pleased to encourage this publicity of 
the bee business on the part of the Government. The article reads 
as follows : 

"A profitable industry is being developed on many of the Govern- 
ment irrigation projects in the production of honey, and press 



26 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

reports from recent state and county fairs indicate that the ciuality 
of this honey is superior. The flavor is exceptionally fine and the 
color clear and sparkling". Alfalfa is the chief source from which 
the bees secure their supply, and as it i)looms constantly from early 
spring" until late in the fall the bees have something- to work on all 
the time, allowing" a greater amount of honey to be stored. 

"Many of the projects are located in famous fruit sections and 
the combination is found to be of mutual advantage. The trees 
furnish an abundance of honey during the blossoming" period, and 
c>rchardmen state that the economic importance of the bee. from 
the standpoint of its value in the pollenization of fruit, cannot be 
overestimated. White clover and small fruits, and in the plains 
regions many varieties of wild flowers, also furnish sources of supply. 

"The bee industry is a lucrative side line for the regular farmer, 
but there is also a wide field for the bee man on these projects 
where everything tends toward specialization and where the farmers 
organize for the standardization and marketing" of their crops. On 
nearly all the projects small tracts for the purpose may be pur- 
chased at reasonable rates. On many of them there are model towns 
laid out at intervals of a few miles. The business lots are grouped 
around a central square, and near the outer boundaries of the town- 
sites the lots contain several acres each. These large lots, sur- 
rounded by wide areas of new agricultural lands devoted largely 
to the raising of alfalfa, are ideal locations for apiaries. They are 
sold at very reasonable rates, and afford opportunities for engaging 
in a business which pays large returns on the investment. The 
average price of bees in the West is probably about $5 a hive. The 
manager of a large apiary on one of the irrigated tracts gives the 
average production of his hives at T6 pounds of surplus honey per 
annum. At ten cents per pound the returns would be $7.60. In 
addition to that the increase averages 100 per cent from year to year, 
doubling the original investment and making a total of about 150 
per cent profit each year on the original investment. 

"The Statistician of the Reclamation Service at AVashington, D. 
C, will furnish detailed information concerning lands irrigated by 
the Government, upon recjuest." 

Keep More Bees. 

'T could not give up the Rkx'iew for it has been the cause of my 
success with bees. I have built up to 200 colonies this year and 
sold enough honey so that I am running 500 colonies another year. 
My yards will be 200 miles apart. * * I think you are improving the 
Review, but don't forget to say 'keep more bees.' " 

All right, brother, we will put the "keep more bees" right on the 
cover. It is a slogan worth adopting, and as it was coined by the 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' RE' 'lEW 27 

Father of the Review, the l?te A\'. Z. Hutchinson. I am sure he 
would be pleased to see it given a permanent place in the publication. 

Among some of the journals lately has sprung up a small dis- 
cussion as to whether that slogan should not be replaced by "keep 
better bees." or "keep bees better." Xot much ! It is the most 
important of them all. Let a man keep more bees and he will be 
forced to keep them better, and will more quickly note the difference 
between the good and the bad strains. "Keep more bees" and you 
will either "keep them better" or you will soon be out of the busi- 
ness. It is the little fellow who is slipshod. \\'ith a small invest- 
ment, with other business demanding his attention, he is more apt 
to neglect the bees. Give him "more bees" and self preservation 
demands that he give the proper attention to those bees, or out he 
goes. Better be entirely out than a putterer. 

But that brings us to the view many seem to have that to give 
bees attention one should be continually meddling with them. They 
seem to think that the extensive bee-keeper neglects his bees. Not 
much ! They are forced to adopt a system. They must know what 
to do and when to do it. It is as important to know what not to 
do as it is to know what to do. It is the big fellows who have the 
bank account. 

Michigan is becoming known as a state of specialists. Come 
up to one of their conventions and learn Zi'hat not to do. Friend 
Bartlett tells how with his system one man can handle 1,000 colonies, 
exclusive of extracting and packing for winter. Another ^Michigan 
beeman is now in Kentucky intending to ship two carloads of bees 
north next spring. L. S. Griggs, of Flint, makes an exclusive busi- 
ness of bee-keeping, handling over 400 colonies. E. D. Townsend. 
of Remus, is too well known to tell about. Does it pay to "keep 
more bees?" Ask those fellows. 



The Michigan Convention. 

Michigan conventions always bring together a bunch of real live 
beemen. Many of them are specialists, and you can guess that 
their discussions are intensely practical. There was not a dulT 
minute during the whole two days' sessions. 

Space will not permit the giving of a detailed account of these: 
sessions, but some of the "meat" is as follows: 

Next convention will be held at the xA.gricultural College^, 
Lansing, Mich. It will probably be held in December. 

National constitution adopted by an almost unanimous vote. 
There was a little opposition at first, but it soon disappeared when 
the members better understood the plans. This makes Michigan 
the first legal branch of the National, I believe. At least I have 
not been informed of any association having taken such action. 



28 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

This makes the dues for the members, including- both local and 
national, $1.50 per year, the same as formerly. It is certainly a 
move in the right direction. 

Foul Brood Inspector G. E. Sanders gave an interesting report 
of his work during the past year. From the 16th of 'May to the 
26th of August he inspected 150,000 colonies of bees, belonging to 
15,000 bee-keepers. Some discussion was brought out by this state- 
ment, as it was considered pretty fast work b}^ some, to examine an 
average of 50' colonies a day, in addition to traveling. However, 
several extensive bee men stated it could be done. Sanders is 
certainly a hustler, and we hope will be on the job again next year. 

The committee on legislation made an interesting report, and 
with one addition to take the place of Mr. Hilton, deceased, was 
continued to present a new foul brood bill to the next legislature. 

Some new ideas were advanced regarding cellar wintering. C. 
F. Smith, of Cheboygan, stated that he successfully winters his bees 
in a wet cellar since he removes the covers and substitutes burlap 
instead. He says that actually there was enough water in that 
cellar to float the hives out on in the spring, and he claims the 
statement is not a joke either. 

L. vS. Griggs, of Flint, gets his outside sections filled first, by 
using but nine frames in a ten-frame hive, with a division board on 
each side. Double bee-space is also used on each side in the super. 
This allows a free passage from the bottom to the super, right on 
the sides, and he finds that it results in getting work started in the 
outside sections first. 

Mr. Johnson, of the Johnson Milk Co., Battle Creek, tests 
thermometers by packing the bull) in melting snow, or ice 
pounded fine like snow, and if they register 32 they are correct. 
Good test. 

Resolutions were oiTered for the late W. Z. Hutchinson, Geo. E. 
Hilton and James Heddon. The latter died December 6th, and will 
be remembered as a very progressive bee-keeper, perhaps the best 
known in Michigan 20 years ago. He was the inventor of the 
Heddon hive. Two members were reported ill, Hon. R. L. Taylor 
and T. F. Bingham. Messages of good cheer were ordered sent 

them. . 

On Probation. 

For six months I have felt that I have been on probation. Dur- 
ing that time my readers have been watching me to see whether I 
would "make good'' as an editor or not. While I have received 
many encouraging words yet I have realized all the time that the 
re^l test would be the renewals. 'Would they come? \Miat were 
the fellows thinking of who didn't write me? And, of course, they 
outnumbered those who did write. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 29 

December came. With that number I sent expiration notices to 
all whose subscriptions had expired. Then came a few days' wait 
for results. Of course those were anxious days. In three or four 
days came the first report from those notices, and that was a re- 
newal from J. G. Baillie, Urbana, Ohio. After that they began com- 
ing in bunches, and while there are still many to renew, yet the 
response has been sufficient so far to satisfy me that my efforts to 
keep the Review up to its past excellent standard are at least appre- 
ciated. With these renewals came many a cheering word which I 
assure you does much to urge one on to do his best. 

But now the real work begins. Nothing can stand still. It must 
either advance or retreat. It is not enough to keep the Review up 
to its past excellent standard; it must be pushed ahead. This means 
that changes must be made. Sometimes these changes will possibly 
be for the worse, but I will trust to the good judgment of my sub- 
scribers to write me a protest when such a move is made. Send me 
an avalanche of letters and postal cards when I make a mistake. Of 
course I will make them. Did you ever see anyone who didn't? 
The target was missed many times before the "bull's-eye'' was hit. 
I'll furnish the "steam" if you'll furnish the "balance-wheel." When 
we make a mistake we'll retreat and try again. I have a number of 
things in view for the betterment of the Review, and they will be 
carefully considered, and no doubt some of them will be tried out 
later. 

And that brings us to this issue. We have a brand new cover 
design. Every time I looked at that four-piece section on the old 
cover I felt that it was out of date. And yet I didn't want to dis- 
card the design entirely. So the four-piece section was changed to 
a one-piece section, the whole design was made smaller, and put 
down in the corner. Then the wording, or name, was brought out 
strong in "Old English." The Review is not ashamed of its name, 
so it is now spelling it right out loud. I am indebted to Wm. Bay- 
ley, of East Orange, N. J., for the suggestion. Thanks, Friend 
Bayley. 

Why did I change the type? Because many of my readers are 
old men. I want those old men to stay with me. There are also 
many younger men and women whose sight is failing. In fact any 
of us like to read the larger type because it is easier. So the larger 
type was selected. This called for more pages, and not to be stingy 
1 have added eight extra pages. Costs more money? Certainly, but 
it is worth more. Didn't I say I was going to put my premium 
money into making a better paper? 

{Continued on page j^) 



30 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



SELECTED ARTICLES 

AND EDITORIAL COMMENTS 



National Association and Report. 

Under this heading, President York gives in the American Bee 
Journal, so good a summing up of the situation that 1 feel that I 
can do no better than to reproduce the article here in whole. Of 
course all readers now know that new constitution has passed, and 
just as soon as a meeting of the directors can be held, full plans 
for the coming year will be announced. Lentil that time there is 
really nothing more that can be told you. The article by President 
York is as follows : 

''We have received a copy of the 42d Annual Report of the 
National Bee-Keepers' Association, which includes, besides the pro- 
ceedings of the convention held at Minneapolis, Minn., Aug. 30 and 
31, 1911, a complete list of the membership, the treasurer's report, 
and copies of both the old and the new constitution. It has also 
about 25 pages of advertising at the back. In all, there are lii 
pages besides the cover. The financial statement made by the 
general manager and treasurer, N. E. France, shows a balance of 
$604.16 on hand in the Honey-Producers' League fund, and $439.70 
in the general fund of the association, but we learn privately that 
there is not enough money in this general fund to pay all the 
expenses to the end of this year. 

"It may be just possible that before this num1)er of the .Itncrican 
Bee Joiinial goes to press, we will have a report of the election of 
officers held last month (Novemljer), and also the vote on the new 
constitution. All, of course, will be interested to know whether or 
not the new constitution is approved, for it would mean quite a 
change in the way the National Association is to be conducted in 
the future. 

"If the new constitution is voted into elTect, there will be 5 
directors instead of 12, and the annual meeting will be mainly execu- 
tive, those attending l)eing delegates elected by the local branches 
or associations. Then those delegates who attend the annual meet- 
ing will elect the officers and directors of the association. This Avill 
make a thoroughly representative body, and it would seem that 
more business can be done at the annual meetings than heretofore, 
for every delegate will be sent with authority to carry out the 
wishes of the local branch or association so far as possible. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 31 

"There is progress and advancement in every line of business 
and association effort, and it is a good time now for the National 
Bee-Keepers' Association to advance a little also. Of course, it 
may not be possible to do all the first year that needs to be done, 
but if things can be started now, it may not be man}' months until 
the effect of the provisions of the new constitution will be felt 
among the members of the Association. As Secretary Tyrrell well 
says : 

"The present fee of the National just a1:)out provides for the 
expenses of the National convention and getting out the Annual 
Report. Alanager France will tell you he must economize to do 
that. This leaves nothing for the larger work of the organization, 
looking up market conditions, advising members regarding their , 
honey sales, assisting states in getting foul-brood laws, and many 
other things that might be mentioned.' 

"In order to secure more funds with which to do more for its 
members, it is proposed that the National membership fee be in- 
creased to $1.50 per year. A third of this amount is to go to the 
local branch or association affiliating with the National. The annual 
dues of the ^Michigan Association have been for several years $1.50, 
and instead of its membership growing less it has increased, and the 
Association has prospered beyond anything known heretofore in 
that state. I\Ir. Tyrrell further says: 

Tt may seem to some that this raise is a mistake, and that bee- 
keepers will not pa}'- the advanced price. But we must not forget 
that sometimes a small fee is really more expensive than a larger 
one. It is not so much what we pay, as what ice get for zchat zee pay. 
If our fee is so small that the whole amount is necessary for the 
running expenses and nothing left for progress, that fee is apt to 
be expensive ; while a larger one, leaving a surplus for doing some- 
thing extra for the members, might be really cheaper.' 

"But whether the new constitution is approved or not, there 
will still be much that the National can do under its former con- 
stitution. Its officiary should devise some method by which the 
balance of the league fund could be used to good advantage in 
trying to create a greater general demand for honey. Perhaps a 
small advertiseemnt run in a few select magazines of large circula- 
tion might be a good thing. It would be much better, however, if 
the National Association were in a position to offer a standard 
brand of honey in response to such advertising. This, of course, 
opens up a very large subject, but we hope the time may come when 
if the National Association is not able to handle the honey business 
on a large scale, that some other organization or company will be 
formed that will be sufficiently strong to do something worth while 
along the line indicated." 



32 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Italians vs. Black Bees. 

Under this heading', Mr. J. A. Kinnon, in Canadian Bcc Journal, 
makes a strong plea for the Italians, and in Gleanings in Bee Culture 
Mr. H. D. Tennent makes an equally strong plea for blacks. When 
doctors disagree, what — ? It was really amusing to see and hear the 
scrap put up on both sides at the Toronto convention. It is an old 
question, and will no doubt always have its adherents on both sides. 
The article by ]\Ir. Kinnon follows: 

"A number of things have been written pro and con in the 
C. B. J. of late regarding the different races of bees, black and 
Italians. 

"As I have had the pleasure of nipping the heads off about 
80 black queens the last two seasons, it may be of interest to some 
of your readers to know what prompted my so doing. Last spring- 
after removing my colonies from the cellar it was only wnth the 
most cautious watching on my part that I kept the black colonies 
from being robbed out en bloc by their yellow cousins, and as Bobby 
Burns often expressed. I sware an aith that if I lived the summer, 
fall would see me rid of at least one nuisance. Black bees as I had 
them in their purity were the poorest defenders of their hives 
imaginable, and it was only by changing them around so as to give 
the black colonies the Italian field bees that I managed at all. Xot 
so with my Italians. AVhen an attack was made on them the 
robbers got stung. That was all, as no honey changed hives. 

"As to the difference in honey gathering qualities. 75 to 100 
lbs. and over in favor of the Italians, has manifested to me that 
there is a dift'erence in the bees .and after the main flow most of my 
Italian colonies put up from 30 to 40 lbs. of fall honey, while the 
blacks required to be fed. 

"Yes, the blacks are all gone and I don't want any more of 
them. The honey flow was of short duration in this localit}-, but 
with proper management I harvested over four tons of honey and 
increased 87 colonies spring count to 165.'' 

]\Ir. Tennant has this to say in Gleanings: 

"W. C. Mollett, page 100, Feb. 15, complains of the excessive 
swarming of the Italians in his locality, and suggests that it is in 
some way due to the kind and quantity of honey-plants. Having 
had a similar experience here, I would suggest that it is not so 
much a matter of honey-plants as of an over-supply of early pollen 
which marks this difference between blacks and Italians. 

SOURCES OF EARLV POLLEN. 

"The country here is rough, with considerable timber, and the 
average number of wild flowers. The fall flow from goldenrod and 
aster, though not usually giving any surplus, leaves the hives well 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 33 

supplied with pollen. In the spring a few good warm days suffice 
to bring into bloom the hepatica, or liverleaf anemone, from which 
the bees bring in whitish pollen. This often comes two weeks before 
the earliest fruit bloom. This is followed by the dandelion, with 
its unlimited pollen. Fruit-bloom usually does not give enough 
lioney to start comb-building; but it does start cell-building. From 
this time the spring beauty, dandelion, buckeye, oak, gum, black- 
berry, and various wild flowers give a constant supply of pollen 
without any appreciable amotint of honey, and the Italians abandon 
themselves to reckless propagation. 

SUPERIORITY OF BLACKS WHERE POLLEX IS AHUXDAXT IX SPRIXG. 

"The blacks would seem to be naturally adapted to such condi- 
tions, for they do not usually "lose their heads'' in this way. but 
defer swarming until there is enough honey to justify increase, and 
may usually be induced to forego it entirely by giving room for 
surplus, and that without the baits and full sheets of foundation 
needed to coax the Italians into the sections. 

"When the breeding of bees shall have become further ad- 
vanced it will no doubt be found possible to interchange the char- 
acteristics of different races when desirable, just as the different 
combs and color patterns, and the sitting and non-sitting dispo- 
sitions of poultry may be so combined by the skillful breeder. It 
is evident that the same combination of traits will not suit ever}'- 
where. 

"The only points which I have found in favor of the Italians 
are their quietness and better defense against robbers; but these 
are more than balanced by their reluctance to enter sections, and 
their swarming proclivities.'' 



A Strong Plea For National Grading Rules. 

Director "Wesley Foster, of Colorado, makes a strong plea in 
Lrlcaniiigs in Bee Culture for national grading rules, and the Review 
believes he is on the right track. So long as we have so many 
dififerent rules for grading there will always be confusion, and we 
can never establish a national grade until we have national grading 
rules. The Canadians claim that by selling by the section instead 
of by the pound that the bee-keeper is obliged to grade more care- 
fully and this they claim is one of the reasons why the}' always get 
so good a price for their honey. There is some food for thought 
in that. Air. Foster says : 

''Xow that the National Association has adopted the Colorado 
double-tier shipping case and 4^4xJ:,Mxl7/s section as the standard, 
why not have national grading rules? Shall we hereafter designate 



34 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



the double-tier V4:-lb. case as the Standard, the National, or the 
American shipping case? Xow, if we can only get together and 
adopt national rules, a big advance will be made. Here in the 
west, we feel confident, of course, that the Colorado rules would 
meet with the same approval as have the double-tier case and the 
4;f4^TLj4xlJ'8-inch section. 

''We are bound to have one universal distributing system before 
many years, the same as the orange growers, and the move for 
unity in supplies points the way. It is but a stepping-stone to more 
economical and direct dealing between producer and consumer. 

"For some reason much more extracted honey was produced in 
Colorado the past year than formerly. The slow flow that has 
been the rule for the past few seasons may have had an efifect in 
driving bee-keepers to extracted honey production. Extracted honey 
can be bought in Colorado for ^yz cents on the western slope, and 
for 7^2 to 9 at Colorado common points in eastern Colorado. The 
freight rate (fourth class) from the western slope to Denver or 
Pueblo is 75 cents per hinidred, Avhich accoimts for the lower price 
in western Colorado. 

"Comb honey will remain in favor so long as it' sells so readily, 
and so lone as extracted honev sells so slowlv." 



EDITORIAL— On Probation. 

{Continued front page sg) 

As boys and girls we all liked to look at pictures. A\ e are only 
grown up boys and girls now. So we all still like to look at pic- 
tures, especially if those pictures tell a story. So more pictures 
have been put in the Review, and I expect to add more in the 
future. Don't fail to send me that picture of your bees, the old log 
gum that has held bees so many years, and of that labor-saving 
appliance which you are using. If you haven't a photo, draw a dia- 
gram and we will fix it up. 

Tell me how vou like what I have done. 




I have had several calls 
for cuts of queens. So 
far 1 have been unab'e to 
supply ihem, but from now 
on i c:n furnish you, 
postpaid, a cut like the 
one sh.own in this adver- 
t'sement for tifty cents. 
Can send you as many as 
you want at this price. 

Address Thf. BK::-Ki-:F:i'a:K.'^ Review, 
2oO Woodlan.d Avenue, Detroit. ^Nlicli. 



What a Foreign Subscriber Thinks. 

Helsincfors, Finland, Europe, 
Xov. 12, 1911. 
Dear Mr. Tyrrell. Detroit. Mich. : 

It is a remarkable fact that the more 
we learn the more we realize how much 
we yet have to learn ; and I find that 
the closer I study each number of The 
Review, the more it tastes "like more." 
I wish to extend my sincerest thanks 
for your efforts for the sake of the 
])ee-'^eef ers of the world. 

\>ry rL'sp:ct fully. Paul AIkkwitz. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



35 



THE OOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 



1 ^M«»:vf 




FANCY 



NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



Just now is a good time for the l)ee-keeper who has honey yet to sell to 
keep his nerve. You will notice by the following reports that the market is 
rather unsettled. This is to be expected, all things considered, and no bee- 
keeper should become alarmed and rush his honey to market, only to more 
completely demoralize the same. While demand is dull j'et prices are still 
holding good, and with the return demand which is sure to come in the 
spring there should be no difficulty in selling at a satisfactory price. The 
main thing now is, don't get excited. 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey 17c to 
18c. Light amber 16c. Amber 15c. Fancy 
white extracted 10c to lie. Light amber and 
amber extracted Sc to 9c. Wax 30c. 

BLAKE LEE CO., 
Dec. 22. 4 Chatam Row. 



CHICAGO— During the month of December 
the quantity of honey sold by the jobbers has 
not been as large as preceding months, yet it 
has sold quite well and while prices are easier, 
fancy grades are not plentiful and are firmly 
held at 17c to 18c per lb. Beeswax ranges at 
30 to 32c per lb. and extracted honey is with- 
out any material change in price. 

R. A. BURNETT & CO.. 
Dec. 21. 173 W. South Water St. 



CINCINNATI— Market on comb honey has 
fallen off somewhat, only demand for fancy 
white selling in retail way at $4.00, jobbing at 
$3.60 to $3.75 according to quantity. Extra 
white extracted in 60-pound cans at 10 cents, 
light amber in 60-pound cans at 8 5<2 cents, am- 
ber in barrels at 7 to 7 >^ cents, beeswax, fair 
demand at $33.00 a hundred. Above are sell- 
ing prices, not what we are paying. 
Dec. 18. C. H. W. WEBER CO. 



KANSAS CITY, MO:— The demand for 
honey still continues to be light and we don't 
look for a much better demand until after the 
holidays; January and February are generally 
good honey months. We quote: No. 1 white 
comb, 24-section cases, $3.25: No. 2 white 
comb, 24-section cases, $2.75-$3.00; No. 1 am- 
ber comb, 24-section cases, $3.00; No. 2 amber 
comb, 24-section cases, $2.50-$2.75; extracted 
white, per pound, S^c-Oc; extracted amber per 
pound, 8c-Sy^c; beeswax, per pound, 25c-28c. 
C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 

Dec. 22. 



DEN\'ER — Our market is heavier stocked 
with extracted honey than comb. Demand for 
both is fair only. We are quoting our local 
market in a jobbing way as follows: No. 1 
White Comb, per case of 24 sections, $3.15; 
No. 1 Light Amber, $2.90; No. 2, $2.70. White 
Extracted Honey per pound 9c; Light Amber 
Sc; Amber and strained 654-" /4c. We pay 26c 
in cash and 28c in trade for clean yellow bees- 
wax delivered here. 

Yours very truly, 
THE COLORADO HONEY 
PRODUCERS' ASSN. 
Nov. 24. F. Randefuss, Manager. 



CINCINNATI— The demand for honey is 
rather good, considering the great quantity that 
is still in the west unsold. We continue to 
sell fancy comb honey at $3.75 to $4.00 a case; 
fancy extracted honey at 9c to lie a pound, ac- 
cording to quantity and quality purchased; 
while for amber extracted honey in barrels we 
are getting dYzc to lYzc a pound. We are 
paying 30c a pound, delivered here, for choice, 
bright yellow beeswax, absolutely free fronr 
dirt. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO., 

"Tlie Busy Bee Men." 

Dec. 23. 31 Walnut St. 



TOLEDO — The market on honey at this 
writing is as usual, at this season of the year, 
quiet, very little demand for comb honey. 
We quote as follows: Fancy white ^lichigan, 
Ohio or Wisconsin in 24-section flat cases, ISc 
per lb.; No. 1 white ^lichigan, Ohio or Wiscon- 
sin in 24-section cases, 17c per lb.; fancy No. 
1 and No. 2 Idaho comb honey. 24-section 
cases, from $3.40 to $3.70. No demand for 
dark or off grades. Extracted white clover and 
basswood in cans, 10c, bbls. i^c lb. cheaper; 
white California sage, in cans, 10c; light am- 



36 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



ber California alfalfa, in cans, 8^c to 9c. 
Beeswax is steady at from 30c to 33c, depend- 
ing on color, etc. Owing to high prices asked 
by the producers, honey has not sold as well 
as was anticipated, and already the western 
men are declining their prices in order to 
move their holdings, but from present outlook 
they are not meeting with ready sale, as pack- 
ers generally are well stocked, and in view of 
the interest shown by the trade, they are not 
interested in taking on further supply even 
at the present prices. 

Dec. 20th. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 

NEW YORK— Trade is rather quiet just 
now, which is generally the case just before 
the holidays. Stocks of comb honey are rather 
light, on account of the short crop, and re- 
ceipts are only of moderate size, and we do not 
e.xpect any more large shipments from now on. 
Prices hold firm at former quotations. E.x- 
tracted honey — While white clover is scarce, 
there seems to be an abundant supply of all 
other grades. We expect to see lower prices 
from now on. For the present we quote: 
California white sage, 9c per pound; light am- 
ber sage, Sc per pound; white alfalfa, 8c to 
Syic per pound; light amber alfalfa, 7c to 7>4c 
per pound; buckwheat, 7c to 7^c per pound. 
Beeswax quiet at 30c per pound. 

Dec. 21. HILDRETH & SEGELKEN. 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will he twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 



FOR SALE 



For S.\le. — Water white and light-amber 
alfalfa and light-amber fall honey, put up in 
any size packages. First class. 

Dadant & Sons, Hamilton, 111. 

For Sale. — Empty second-hand 60-lb. cans, 
as good as new, two cans to a case, at 25 cts. 
per case. C. H. W. Weber & Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 

April-hatched Indian Runner Ducks, 
fawn and white; $2.00 each; $3.50 a pair; 
$5.00 per trio. White-egg strain. 

Kent Jennings, Mt. Gilead, Ohio. 

Rhode Island Red Cockerels that are Red. 
Have spent three years line breeding. These 
are the first I have offered for sale. 

Dr. R. p. Wixom, 
273 Euclid Ave. East, Detroit, Mich. 

Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 

Fountain Pens for $2.00, $3.75 and $5.00. 
If not satisfied return pen to me and I will 
.return the money. E. F. Patterson, 

Rt. 96, Montrose, Colo. 



For Sale. — 175 colonies of bees in 8-frame 
hives, run for comb honey, with 500 comb- 
honey supers, and about 35 full-depth hive- 
bodies filled with honey for next season's feed- 
ing. I am close to the Nevada State-line. No 
foul brood in this valley. H. Christensen, 
Coleville, ]Mono Co., Cal. 

For Sale. — Quantity 10 frame hives, fixtures, 
magazines, etc. Edwin Ewell, Litchfield, 
Mich. 

"Eggmakers" — S. C. Brown Leghorns. State 
wide reputation. Cockerels $2.00, $3.00 and 
$5.00 each by return express. Wm. J. Cooper, 
Mt. Pleasant, Rt. 8, Mich. 

For Sale. — Amber and buckwheat honey in 
new 60-lb. tin cans. C. J. B.\ldriuge, Home- 
stead Farm, Kendaia, N. Y. 

Ringlet Barred Plymouth Rocks. — Fine, 
healthy, well barred cockerels and pullets at 
$2.00 each. Prize winners at our County Fair. 
R. J. Schloneger, Pigeon, Mich. 

For Sale. — Clover, basswood, alfalfa, sage or 
light amber fall honey.^ First-class stock put 
up in any sized cans. Send for price list. M. 
V. Facey, Preston, Fillmore Co., Minn. 

For Sale. — New crop of alfalfa seed; 4 
pounds by mail, prepaid, $1.10; 50 to 100 lbs., 
14% cts. per lb. Sacks, 25 cts. extra. 

R. L. Snodgr.\ss, Rt. 4, Augusta, Kansas. 

Light-Amber extracted honey, principally 
from cotton bloom, in new 60-lb. cans. Price 
8% cts. per lb. f. o. b. Bogart, cash with or- 
der. Samples free. John W. Cash, Bogart, 
Ga. 

Golden Queens.- — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, five 
and six band, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also 
nuclei and full colonies. Send for circular and 
price list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lillie Farmstead Poultry. — B. P. Rocks, 
R. I. Reds, and S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for 
sale. 15 for $1; 26 for $1.50; 50 for $2.50. 
Colon C. Lillie, Coopersvillt, Mich. 

Silver, Golden and White Wyandotts. — 
Choice breeding stock at reasonable prices. 
Catalogue free. Browning's Wyandott Farm, 
Rt. 33, Portland, Mich. 

Modern Bee Culture, or breeding a better 
bee. New and revised edition. Enlarged and 
illustrated. 10 cts. 

Germania Apiaries, Germania, Ark. 

White Wyandotte Cockerels, $2.50, $3.00 
and $3.50 each. From thoroughbred stock and 
heavy layers. A. Franklin Smith. 

Rt. 9, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Buttercupa and Houdans for large white 
eggs. Fine cockerels $3.00 and $5.00. 
Riverview Poultry Farm, Union City, Mich. 

For Sale. — 6"/^ acres of best level land; new 
eight-room house; fine large spring and branch; 
5500 sq. feet of greenhouses; cannery; other 
out-buildings; right at city limits, population 
20,000; fine market; $4000 to $5000 yearly 
business; good for bees. Write for price and 
further particulars. 

M. D. Andes. Bristol, Tenn. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



37 



For Sale.— 560 acres of land in Arkansas, in 
the rice belt. Half cash; balance, city property. 
T. J. Greenfield, Hickory Ridge, Ark. 

For Sale. — Clover honey ripened on the 
hive, in 60-lb. cans; gathered in June, ex- 
tracted in -August. Sample free. 

J. F. Moore, Tiffin, Ohio. 

For Sale. — Choice light-amber extracted 
honey — thick, well ripened, delicious ilavor. 
Price 9 cts. per lb. in new 60-lb. cans. 

J. P. Moore, Morgan, Ky. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
AVrite for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 



For Sale — A. I. Root Supplies. Every- 
thing needed in the apiary. Send for cata- 
logue. Prices right. Sawyer & Hedden, Irv- 
in^ton. New Jersey. 

For Sale. — Finest quality white clover and 
basswood blend extracted honey, in new 60-lb. 
cans, $6.25 for single can, $12.00 per case of 
two cans, F. O. B. Flint. Cash with order. 
Leoxard S. Griggs, 
711 Avon St., Flint, Mich. 

Fruit Lands, general store in English col- 
ony; apiary locations for sale, rent, or trade; 
bees, queens, honey, wa.x hives, and other sup- 
plies; fine opportunity for tropical bee-man with 
small capital; climate and lands finest in the 
world. Gather honey the year round. No land 
agent. I own all I offer. D. W. Mill.'vr, 

Bartle, Oriente, Cuba. 

February 20th and later I offer 400 
three-frame neuclei with tested Italian qu^;en 
for $3.50 each. Untested Italian queen 
for 75c each. Satisfaction guaranteed. My 
strain of Italian bees are developed honey- 
gatherers, result of 19 years record-keeping and 
selecting. No b'-e-disease has ever been near 
my bees. W. D. Achord, Fitzp.\trick, Bul- 
lock Co., Alabama. 



WANTED 

Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted. — To buy amber and dark extracted 
honey; to sell, second-hand 60-lb. cans. 
A. G. Woodman Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. Hildreth & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

W.\nted. — 100 to 300 colonies bees to work 
on shares the coming season. Must be free 
from foul brood and in good hives. 33 years' 
experience. A. D. D. Wood, Box 61, Lansing, 
Mich. 

Wanted. — You to write me before ordering 
your hives. I have the use of a complete 
wood-working shop during the winter. Price, 
8 frame Langstroth hive $1.00, 10 frame $1.10. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Sample hive nailed 
and shipped at above price. 

Frank Rasmussen, Greenville, Mich. 



Wanted. — Help for the active bee season of 
1912 — one or two young men who want to 
learn bee-keeping; board promised, and a little 
more if we do well. Wanted, also, a carload 
of bees, spring delivery. 

R. F. Holtermann, 
Brantford, Ont., Canada. 



Qjiiom 



The lartrest, best kpepind, handsomest Onions 
produced from Northern Grown Seed-. Kalze 
t^ieeds are grown in the extreme North, ai 
pediiree Etociis, and for ruritv, vitality and 
yield are unsurpassed. Catalog tells. 

8 MAKKET M»KTS, 18c. 
The following are the three most popular 
<;ort3: One large package each White 
1'ortueal, Yellow Globe Ilanvers 
and lied Wethersfield, to te:~i, 12o. 

FOR ICc. 
10,000 kernels of splendid Lettuce, Kadish, 
Tomato, Cabbage, Turnip, Onion, Celery, 
Parsley, Carrot, Melon and Flower Seeds 
producing bushels of vegetables and flowers 
Ibrlfic pootpaid. Our great Plant and 
Seed Catalog free for the ask in g. Write to-da\ 

John A.SalzerSeed Co. 21 3 S.SthSUa Crosse,Wls 




Paint Without Oil 

Remarkable Discovery That Cuts 
Down the Cost of Paint Seventy- 
Five Per Cent. 

A Free Trial Paekase is Mailed to 
Everyone T*ho Writes. 

A. L. Rice, a prominent manufacturer 
of Adams, X. Y., has discovered a pro- 
cess of making a new kind of paint 
v^'ithout the use of oil. He calls it 
Powderpaint. It comes in the form of 
a dry powder and all that is required 
is cold water to make a paint weather 
proof, fire proof and as durable as oil 
paint. It adheres to any surface wood, 
stone or brick, spreads and looks like 
oil paint and costs about one-fourth 
as much. 

Write to Mr. A. L. Rice, Manufr., 303 
North St., Adams, N. Y., and he will 
send you a free trial package, also 
color card and full information show- 
ing you how' you can save a good many 
dollars. Write today. 

CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 

in 

Houey, Beeswax, Maple Sujcfar r.nil 

Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 



WANTED 

Early orders for the Old Reliable Bingham 
Bee Smokers. Address 

T. F. Bingham, Alma Mich. 



38 



THE BEE-KEFPERS' REVIEW 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 



Power 



SAWS 



in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 



384 Ruby Street, 



Rockford, Illinois. 



RIGHT NOW IS A GOOD TIME TO FIGURE 



Many bee-keepers have found it profitable to figure out in early winter what bee 
supplies they would want next season. After doing this they would then send the list to 
cunniir mpn fQ,- prices. Naturallv we can give you better prices now than we can later in 
Let VIS help you figure it out. Send us your list of supplies wanted. 



supply men fo 
the season 



M. H. HUNT & SON, Lansing, Mich. 



A 



MEXICO AS 
BEE COUNTRY 



B. A. Hadsell, one of the largest bee-keepers 
in the world, has made si.x trips to Mexico, 
investigating that country as a bee country, 
and is so infatuated with it that he is closing 
out his bees in Arizona. He has been to great 
expense in getting up a finely illustrated 32- 
page booklet describing the tropics of Mexico 
as a Bee Man's Paradise, which is also su- 
perior as a farming, stock raising and fruit 
country, where mercury ranges between .55 
and 98. Frost and sun-stroke is unknown. 
Also a great health resort. He will mail this 
book free by addressing 

B. A. HADSELL, Lititz, Pa. 

WANTED 
WHITE HONEY 



Both comb and extracted. Write 

xis before disposing of 

your crop. 



HILDRETH & SEGELKEN 

265-267 Greenwich St. 

New York, N. Y. 

American Butter & Cheese 
Co., 

31-33 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 

Always in the market for choice 
comb honey. Write us. 



SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufaduring Sedions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 
CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 

AQUASUN 

One gallon of dark honey makes 200 to 300 
gallons of Aquasun, which is finer in flavor 
and more nutritious than any apple or grape 
juice. Made quickly, by agitation, same as 
buttermilk. 

ANTABUM 

One gallon of dark honey makes 20 to 40 
gallons of Antabum, which, fed to bees, as a 
spring tonic, enables them to digest and store 
3 to 5 times as much honey as when not so 
assisted. Either process, by mail, $1. 

C. \^. DAYTON, Chatsworth, Calif. 



lY^^l^m BEES''"'^ Queens and 
^^^^^^^p^^^,^,,,^,^,,.,,,^^^ supplies. Root's 
standard goods. Ask for circular. 

ALISO APIARY, El Toro, Calif. 

2-lO-llt 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



39 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young basswood. timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 



The 

Dittmer Way 

Is to Have Your Wax Worked 

Into Comb Foundation by the 

DITTMER PROCESS. 

We have a special department for 
Working the Bee Keepers' Wax into 
Comb Foundation bj' the DITTMER 
PROCESS. 

A postal will bring you full informa- 
tion telling why THE DITTMER 
WAY is Cheaper. 

A liberal discount offered on any 
Bee Keepers' Supplies. 

Gus. Dittmer 
Company 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

Bright, Powerful. Economical, 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in your home. If your 
dealer hasn't got them, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
many as you want at 25c each. 
AGENTS WANTED EVERY- 
WHERE. 

THE STEEL MANTLE LIGHT CO. 

332 Huron St., Toledo, O. 





Established 18S5 
WE CARRY AN" UP-TO-DATE LINE OF 

Bee-keepers' Supplies 

Write for our 50-page catalog 
free, and for lowest prices on 
supplies. Full information 

given to all inquiries. We 
handle the best make of goods 
for the bee-keeper. 

Freight facilities good. Let 
us hear from you. 
John Nebel & Son Supply Co., High Hill, Mo. 

Don*t Forget Our Liner 
Columns. 

Only three issues old, and look at 
them! Nearly a page and a half! 
Have you anything to sell ? Do you 
want to buy? Do you need help? Why 
not trv a RnaEW liner? 



Honey Honey Honey 

We Want to Buy 

We Want to Sell 

We are always in the market for 
Honey, both comb and extratced, if 
quality and price justify. Should you 
have any to offer, let us hear from you. 
If extracted, mail sample, state how it 
is put up and lowest price; if comb, 
state what kind and how packed. 

If in the market for honey, write 
for prices. 

Cans Cans Cans 

We have a surplus of second hand, 
five gallon cans, two to a case, as good 
as new, used but once. Offer same, 
while they last, at 25c per case f. o. b. 
Cincinnati. Order quick, if you want 
any. 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 

2146-48 Central Ave. CINCINNATI, 0, 



40 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



A New Year's Resolution 
for the Year 1912 

I will keep more bees. 

I will devote more time to my bees. 

I will give more thought to my bees. 

I will co-operate with the local and national organizations. 

I will use Lewis Beeware. 

THE NEW 1912 LEWIS BEEWARE CATALOG IS NOW READY FOR 
YOU. THE BEST WE HAVE EVER ISSUED. 

ENTIRELY REWRITTEN WITH NEW ILLUSTRATIONS. 
MORE COMPLETE AND COMPREHENSIVE THAN EVER. 

If you are not on our regular mailing list, send for one at once — 
it is free for the asking. 

30 DISTRIBUTING HOUSES SELL LEWIS 
BEEWARE THROUGH THIS CATALOG. 

Ask for the name of the nearest one. 
LEWIS BEEWARE IS SUCCESS INSURANCE. 

G. B. LEWIS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Beeware WATERTOWN, WIS. 



Carniolan Alpine Queens — Gray Workers 

SELECT TESTED QUEENS, March, April, May, $5.00; 

June, July, August, $3.50. 
SELECT UNTESTED, June, July, August, $2.00. 

Shipped to all parts of the world, postage free. Safe arrival guaranteed. Inter- 
national money order with every order. Dead queens replaced if returned in 24 hours 
after arrival. References respective financial and commercial responsibility of the under- 
signed Association can be had at every Imperial-Royal Austro-Hungarian Consulate in 
the U. S. and Canada. Write for our booklet. Orders for nuclei and hives cannot be 
filled until everything concerning this line of business is arranged properly. 

Remit money order and write English to the 

Imperial -Royal Agricultural Association 

Ljubljana, Carniola (Krain) 
AUSTRIA 



nz. 



m 



^1^ 




j^ s^H^ 



^i^ 




Are our specialty. Winter your bees in Protection Hives. Liberal early order 
discounts. 

A. G. WOODMAN Co.. Grand Rapids. Mich, 



BARGAIN SALE 

■■IN- 

BEE SUPPLIES 

DON'T MISS IT 

Take advantage of the Closing Out 
Sale of the Page & Lyon Go's 
Stock of 

OLD RELIABLE 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Send for Catalog and write me just how 
much and what you want, and I will 
quote you NET PRICES. 

J. F. KENKEL, Trustee 

for Page & Lyon Mfg. Co. 
NEW LONDON, WISCONSIN 



Figure This Out For 

'\T IC If You buy Bee - Supplies 

I OUrSClil NOW that you will need 
^^■^^^-— ^^"^■"" in April you Save Money 
at the rate of 1 2 per cent on the $. 

Three per cent is the amount of our early order discount on 
cash purchases in January. January to April is just three months 
— ^/4 of a year. Now, 3*^^ for 3 months is interest at the rate of 
12% per year — so you see why we urge early orders accompanied 
by cash this month. 

Another reason is that we can serve you better now than 
three months hence. In a few weeks we will be putting up car- 
load shipments for our dealers and distributing centers and every 
effort in our big plant — the largest establishment in the world 
devoted to the manufacture of bee-supplies — will be directed to 
filling rush orders. You will be just as anxious for your goods as 
our other patrons, and will deserve and receive the same attention 
— no matter what the amount of your order may be, but 

WE CAN SERVE YOU BETTER NOW. 

and we want to make it worth your while to place an early order. 
Try this on a part of your Hst anyway. Saving at the rate of 12/t 
per year ought to interest everybody. 

WE MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING IN 
BEE-SUPPLIES. 

Get our 1912 catalog which gives descriptions, illustrations 
and prices on everything from bee-hives to bee-books, from frames 
to comb-foundation. Get this catalog now. 



The A. I. Root Company 

MEDINA, OHIO 



THE CHAS. F. MAY CO.. PRINTERS. DETROIT, M ICH . 





^ — ^ Pit KIlQlmrl \Hr\MU\ii 



Published Mont% 




FEB. 
1912 

"W W ^^ 

DfTROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 



Friction 
Transmission 




Self 
Starter 



Five Good Models 



There is a Cartercar for every 
need of the practical man and 
his family — four, five and seven- 
passenger Touring Cars, Coupe 
and Roadster. 

In these models are all the 
latest improvements in the au- 
tomobile world, and also the 
Cartercar features which have 
given satisfaction to thousands 
of drivers. 

For business needs, the Car- 
tercar is speedy, always ready 
and always reliable — and for 
pleasure it is luxurious, easy to 
drive, and with plenty of power 
to travel any roadway without 
jolting or tiring the occupants 
of the car. 

The patented Friction Trans- 
mission of the Cartercar pre- 
vents waste of power and is so 
simple and reliable that it is 
recognized as the most efficient 
form of transmission. It gives 



an unlimited numUer of speeds, 
adapting the car especially to 
country use. 

The Chain-in-oil Drive is ab- 
solutely noiseless, and running 
in a continual oil bath, there is 
practically no wear on the chain. 

Self Starter, Full Floating 
Rear Axle, Three Brakes, and 
many other features just as 
good, combine to make the Car- 
tercar the ideal car for every- 
one to drive. The self-starter 
makes it very easy for ladies to 
operate. 

The man who drives a Carter- 
car has more time for business 
— botli he and his family get 
more enjoyment out of life — 
and he finds that his car is one 
of the best investments he ever 
made. 

Let us send you complete in- 
formation. 



Cartercar Company 



v^. 



PONTIAC, MICHIGAN. 



_^ 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



41 



2 Years f or H or jNJew Bee Book Free 



No. 1. — We have some extra back 
copies of the American Bee Journal 
for each month of 1911, and so long 
as they last we will send all these 
copies and to the end of 1912 (to 
a new subscriber) for only $1.00. 
This makes two years for the dollar. 
Better send in your dollar at once, 
and take advantage of this ofifer. It 
surely is a big bargain in bee litera- 
ture that you should accept if not 
now a subscriber. Why not order 
today? 



No. 2.— We have had Mr. C. P. 
Dadant revise Newman's "Bees and 
Honey" book of 160 pages, making 
it now nearly 200 pages, with over 
l.JO illustrations. It is called "First 
Lessons in Bee-Keeping," Just the 
book for beginners. Bound in strong 
paper cover, with brood-comb illus- 
tration. Price, 50 cents, postpaid ; 
or we will send it (to a new sub- 
scriber) with the American Bee 
Journal from now to the end of 
1912— all for only $1.00. 



Sample copy of the American Bee Journal free. Address, 
GEORGE W. YORK & CO., 117 N. Jefferson St., Chicago, 111. 



EARLIEST POTATOES 



-'s Hardy NorlhprnGrown Alfalfa grows wherever Red Clover 
, lull produces per acre three tiinea the food value of Red Clover 
ini's tljat of Tinioth.v. This keeu statement is on the authority 
of the Agricultural Department. Salzer's Alfalfa is as hardy as oak. It's 
the bii^gfst, quickest continuous moaev-raaker for the farmer k 

EvGov. W. D. Hoard of Wisconsin writes : ''On .30 acres I raised over 
$1'500 worth of Alfalfa hay. There is no better money -maker that I know of." 

Kalzer's Earlletit Potato Collection 
composf'd of four rare earliest sorts and one later, all separately packed, 
full weight, per hbl., |4.00. The crop from this Collection should easily 
be sold off for Earliest Potatoes, netting you $r.!5.00. 
Onions. 8 Bie Pkg*.* ISo. 
Largest growers of Onion and Vegetable Seeds. For trial a big package 
.■ach of White Portugal, Yellow Globe Danvers and Red Wetb 
field Onion Seed for 12c. 

For 10c in stamps we mail 
I package of our Hardy Alfalfa Clover, also our Famoui 
Rejuvenated White Bonanza Oats, together with 
lot of other rare farm seed samples, as also our 
umoth Catalogue, if you ask for same. 



JOHN A. SALZER SEED CO 

^13 South 8th Street 

La Crosse, Wisconsin 




THE GEO. B. HOWE ARTICLES WILL BEGIN IN THE 

MARCH NUMBER. 

Mr. Howe wrote nie this month that he had licen prevented from getting the 
first installment of his article on queen rearing ready for February. It seems he 
had it written, but being busy with other things omitted some of the things he 
wished to say, so is writing it over. We can afford to wait another month in 
order that Mr. Howe may get in all the things he wants to say. 



42 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



BINGHAM 

Ori^nal 
Direct Draft 

CLEAN 

Bee Smokers 



BINGHAM SMOKERS 

Insist on Old Reliable Bingham Bee Smokers ; for 
sale by all dealers in bee-keepers' supplies. For over 
30 years the standard in all countries. The smoker 
with a valve in the bellows, direct draft, bent cap, in- 
verted bellows and soot-burning device. 

Smoke Engine, 4-inch each $1.25; mail, $1.50 

Doctor, 3^-inch each 

Conqueror, 3-inch each 

Little Wonder, 2-inch each 

Honey Knife each 

Manufadlured only by 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids, Mich. 




85; 


mail. 


1.10 


75 ; 


mail, 


1.00 


50; 


mail. 


.65 


TO; 


mail, 


.80 



Protection Hive 



The best and lowest price hive on the market. This hive has ^.s material 
in the outer wall, and is not cheaply made of y% material like some other 
hives on the market. Send for circular showing 12 large illustrations. It 
will pay you to investigate. 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids, Mich. 




THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 



43 




"If goods are wanted quick, send to Pouder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
My equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 
excelled. 

PAPER HONEY JARS 

For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis,lnd. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 



Power 



SAWS 



in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 

384 Ruby Street, Rockford, Illinois. 



WHAT YOU GET AT 

C I N C 1 N N AT 1 



Some things in addition to service, prompt and satisfactory shipments, 
and a real desire to please you, that come from the central point of dis- 
tribution. 

Root's Supplies — new and clean, and of the finest quality. New hives, new foundation 
— everything fresh from the factory in carload shipments. 

E.xRLY-oRDER DISCOUNTS FOR Cash : Three per cent for January; two per cent for Feb- 
ruary — a worth-while saving to which you are entitled. Don't fail to get your 
order in at once. 

Saving on Freight or Express. By buying here, part of the cost of transportation is 
borne by us. Vou pay only from Cincinnati. This is quite an item on large 
orders, and our patrons are coming to appreciate it more and more. 

Just bear these facts in mind, and liegin the new year right by ordering 
your season's supplies from 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO., 

2146 CENTRAL AVENUE, CINCINNATI, OHIO 



44 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



^/, 



.ft 



falcon 

The See- Keepers' 

See Supplies. 

To insure best results 
See that you get FALCON goods. 

SECTIOIVS 

(^f White Basswood. 

FOUND ATION 

Made by our special process. 

HIVES 

Cut from white pine only. 

OTHER SUPPLIES. 
Every article needed by the bee-keeper. 

Send for Red Catalog. Give list of 
1912 requirements for quotation from 
nearest dealer. 



W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

li'licrc the good hcc-lnvcs come from. 

Factory, Falconer, N. Y., or 117 North 

Jefferson Street, Chicago, 111. 



800 Cas2s of Second - Hand 

Honey Cans. At 19 Cents 

Per Case, 



These cans are occupying valuable 
space, and must be sjld this montli. To 
get tlieni your order must he mailed in 
February. ^\'e are making this low- 
price to move them at once, and any 
sized order will be accepted at 19 cts. 
per case of two sixty-pound cans, f. o. 
b. cars at Detroit. - _ 

These cans are clean and bright in- 
side, having had the honey drained 
out but not washed to rust tlicm, but 
the outside appearance is not good 
good enough for first-class honey. Just 
the thing, however, for No. 2 or bakers' 
grade of honey. Most cases have a 
I-iartition in the center. Address P>ox 
C, care The Bee-Keepers' Review, 230 
Woodland Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



National Bee -Keepers' 
Association 

OBJECTS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



The objects of this Association shall be to 
aid its members in the business of bee-keeping; 
to help in the sale of their honey and beeswax, 
and to promote the interests of bee-keepers in 
any other direction decided upon by the Board 
of Directors. 

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

President — Ceo. W. York, Chicago, 111. 
Vice-Pres. — Morley Pettit, Guelph, Ont. 
Secretary — E. B. Tyrrell, Detroit, Mich. 
Treas.-Gen'l Mgr.--N. E. France, Plattsville, 
Wis. 

DIRECTORS. 

E. D. Townsend, Remus, Mich, 
Wesley Foster, Boulder, Colo. 

F. Wilcox, Mauston, Wis. 

J. E. Crane, Middlebury, Vt. 

J. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn, 



Annual Membership ii!1..^0, one-third, or 50 
cents of which goes to the local branch where 
such branch is organized. Send dues to the 
Secretary. 



"Griggs Saves You Freight." 



TOLEDO 

Is the best point to get goods quick. 
Send us a list of the goods you wish 
and let us quote you our best price. 

2% DISCOUNT 
IN FEBRUARY 

FROM CATALOG PRICES 

HONEY AND BEESWAX wanted 
in exchange for supplies. 

We also handle Butter, Eggs, and 
all kinds of farm produce. Write us 
what you have to sell. 

S. J. Griggs & Co. 

Toledo, O. 

No. 26 Erie St., near Monroe 
"Griggs, tlic King Bee" 



46 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




A MONTHLY JOURNAL 

DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF HONEY PRODUCERS 

^l.nn A ffar 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editor and Publisher 
Office OF Publication - - - 230 NA/oodlan d Aven ue 

VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, FEBUARY 1, 1912. No. 2. 



The Question of Wintering and Spring Protection. 

HOMER MATHEWSON. 

"^^^ HIS much discussed subject of winlerins;- seems to be a sealed 
C y book to m.any, notwithstanding the mass of articles published 
in its regard. In m}- experience for the past ten years I have 
adopted the following plan : 

Beginning in the fall, first see that brood rearing is kept going 
as long as possible. That all colonies have ample stores. Xext, put 
them in the cellar, which I do about Xov. '^0 to Dec. 1st. In my 
opinion bees winter much better if allowed to see some cold weather. 

The cellar should be ample in size. Hives should be set on 
benches at least one foot high. Outward ventilation is absolutely 
necessary. A\'ith such arrangements the intake will usually be 
^ufficient through holes in the wall and around the door. Loosen 
all covers and open entrances to fullest extent. Hang a piece of 
canvas in front of hives that will reach from ceiling to bottom of 
cellar. 

In regard to noise and other confusion I don't think it makes 
much, if an}-, difference. My cellar is opened from one to five times 
each day and the bees are perfectly quiet. 

During the warm weather in December I often open a three 
In' three-foot window in each end of the cellar and leave them open 
all night. For temperature I prefer a Avarm cellar, one seldom 
going below (30. but you must ventilate. 

The spring end of the matter is this : \\'e will suppose that 
conditions are right for setting out. About dark open doors and 
windows of cellar and commence to carry out a1:)OUt one hour later. 
Finish, if possible, that night. If the night be cold all the better. 



48 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Contract entrances that night and next morning wrap all hives with 
straw up to the covers (see photo). Tie the straw with a string- 
around the hive. Put on cushions and, if weather is favorable, clean 
bottom boards. Commence with an extra and exchange the re- 
mainder. 

I have long been a convert of the Alexander plan of spring 
feeding. When you clean bottom boards fasten the feeder in posi- 
tion. In this feeder lies the success of the season. Feed a little 
each day until fruit bloom and between fruit bloom and clover and 
you will get a crop. No feed and the crop will not bother you. 

At time of setting out be sure to put all light weight colonies 
in the front row of the yard ; the stray bees from the yard will help 
build them up better than any manipulation I ever heard of. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 

[When I received the photo shown in this issue. I wrote Mr. 
Mathewson asking what that was piled up on the entrances of the 
hives. It looked like bees but I felt sure it couldn't be at a time 
when they needed spring protection. He replied that it was a 
variety of sea grass which he gets from an upholsterer who uses it 
for stuffing cushions. It is porous and will not pack. 

This method of using straw for spring protection has its good 
features, and is certainly a cheap and easy method. One would have 
to look out for fire, however, when using the smoker.] 



Improvement of the Bee — The Present Status of 

the Question. 

DR. A. F. BONNEY 

{Concluded Jrot)i January NiDiibcr) 

I suppose the five-banded Italian has been made such l)y long 
continued selection, but I see no reason for not belie\ing that muta- 
tions were actually involved in this selection. I cannot agree with 
Dr. Phillips' idea that it will require thousands of generations to 
bring about improvements in the honey bee. I believe it can be 
done very quickly if we can detect advantageous mutations when 
they do occur and can further keep these mutations by proper 
breeding. The latter problem though is a very difficult one, not 
onl}- on account of parthenogenesis being involved, but on account 
of the difficulty in controling mating. I see no practical way to 
control the latter except by having nothing but bees of a given 
strain in one locality. I fully believe that it is possible to get strains 
which will gather more honey than those we now have, and it seems 
within the realm of possibility that a non-swarming bee might make 
its appearance as a mutation. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 49 

To get bees which will maintain larger colonies seems to be the 
most difficult thing of all, but after having seen what Dr. Castle has 
accomplished with other animals at the Bussey Institution I am 
inclined to think that nothing within reason is impossible in this 
line of work. 

I regret that I am not able to gi\e you any more definite informa- 
tion for I am simply a beginner in this sort of thing. 

A'ery truly }ours, 

A\ ir.Aiox Xewell. 
State Entomologist. 

October :?4, 1911. 

[A similar letter to Prof. Davenport produced the following 
reply] : 
Dr. A. F. Bonney, Buck Grove, Iowa. 

Dear Sir: — Your letter regarding improving bees received some 
time ago. 

The difficulty in improving the l)ee is entirely a technical one. 
It is possible that something may be done b}' injecting spermatozoa 
from the male into the young queen, or cages may be devised which 
will control the natural mating. If this can be done there is prob- 
ably no limit to the combinations that may be made of characters 
in existing bees. Sincerely yours, 

Chas. B. Davexport. 

[A letter from Dr. Bonney to Prof. \\\ E. Castle secured the fol- 
lowing reply] : 

Forest Hills. Mass.. September 27, 1911. 
Dr. A. F. Bonney, Buck Grove, Iowa. 

Dear Doctor Bonney : — I am a strong believer in the efficacy of 
selection to modify animals of all sorts. I base this opinion partly 
on experiments of my own which are still in progress, and partly 
on a critical examination of the experiments of others. The scientific 
basis of my views I have stated in part in a little book on heredity 
recently published by D. Appleton & Co., New York. I heartily 
concur in the statement of Professor Phillips as cited in your letter. 
The article which you mention from the Bee-Keefer's Reniew I 
have not yet had an opportunity to read but shall do so at an early 
date. Quite apart, however, from any special considerations con- 
cerning the honey bee I should subscribe to the general proposi- 
tion that no organism is a perfect and complete type in the sense 
that it cannot be changed by selection and breeding. 

Yours ^'ery truly, W. E. Castle. 

I am inclined to let the reader digest the above letters for him- 
self, and it must be apparent that there is much food for thought 
in them. Personalh' I have somewhat changed mv mind about the 



50 THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 

possibility of improving- the bee, or, rather, of bettering" a yard filled 
with bees, though at present I incline to the idea that it must be 
done by culling out the undesirable colonies, and in connection with 
this work raising a vast number of drones from excellent mothers, 
while we do not know but what the worst drone in the bunch will 
mate with our new queen. I think the time will come when students 
of heredity and JMendelism will agree wnth me that parthenogenesis 
and mating are such disturbing factors in the study of the bee that 
complete knowledge of this interesting animal is almost an impos- 
sibility. Further, I do not think the man who has to hustle for 
every pound of honey he can get during the season a very good per- 
son to study evolution, nor can they look to secure positive results 
when surrounded by farmer bee-keepers who never saw a drone-trap, 
not to mention wild colonies in adjacent timbers. The matter of 
improving bees is a formidable task for an untrained man, and the 
more bees there are in his vicinity the harder the work. The short 
life of the animal we have to deal with is a feature not to be over- 
looked, and one which, to my mind, will give us much trouble in 
producing a new strain or breed. Not only this, but we do not 
know what effect the drones have in the problem of mating, while 
it is probable that they are as important in building up a breed of 
bees as is the male of the quadruped in impro\'ing domestic stock. 
However, these are problems. If creative evolution be a scientific 
fact — and I am not ready to deny — the honey-bee can probably be 
improved. I was struck with what ^Ir. Newel said in regard to 
mutations in the bees, and suggest that his remarks about partheno- 
genesis and 'JMendelism be reread. 

Prof. Phillips is so well known to bee-keepers that it will not 
be at all necessary to call attention to his letter, but I do wish it 
noted that he makes no extravagant claims. 'Tf mating could be 
controlled," he says, "it seems entirely logical to suppose that ac- 
curate breeding would bring good results." Again, "However, it 
must be admitted, I think, that much of the breeding work now 
being attempted is probably faulty." How different is all this from 
some of my brash guesses, to say nothing about the claims of some 
bee-keepers as to the strains of bees they have produced in a couple 
or three seasons. 

I cannot refrain from telling would-be breeders of bees that any- 
where in the treeless plains of the Dakotas can be found hundreds 
of square miles where no stray drones will make love to fancy girl 
bees. Of course the bees would have to be fed, but that should not 
be a hardship considering the quality of queens ai'd drones one 
could — or might — get. 

I suppose about ninety-nine percentum of the bee-keepers in the 
United States care nothing about this matter, realizing how useless 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 51 

it is to acquire honey and education at the same time, and the letters 
I offer do not seem to encourage research by cross-roads bee-keep- 
ers. I know from my correspondence with many bee-keepers that 
thev are. as a rule, very skeptical as to the claims of ']Miller, Howe, 
Miles and others, and recent discussions in Gleanings anent "Golden- 
all-over"' and "Long-tongued queens" have not lessened the dis- 
trust. Yet. if. as Prof Davenport says: "The difficulty in improv- 
ing the bee is entirely a technical one," we may hope to look for 
results. It seems that the National Government might establish an 
experimental station in one of the Dakotas, but the honey industry 
is probably not yet of sufficient importance, or the results to be 
obtained not sufficient to warrant the expense. 

Continued sickness has caused me to send this article out while 
far from perfect. I hope someone l)etter able will take up the work. 

Buck Grove. Iowa. 

Something More About the Caucasian Bee. 

J. W. BLAKELY. 

•jg DITOR Review: — My article concerning the Caucasian bee 
tC ill November issue of the Review has brought many in- 
quiries concerning" this race of bees and their management. 
\Vith the approval of the Editor I will endeavor to bring forward 
my method which such able writers as Gately of Arkansas, W. K. 
Morrison and the late and lamented W. E. Alexander have in a 
measure brought forward, yet the Orthodox bee-keeper still follows 
the old rut marked out by the wheels of antiquity. I have been 
successful with the Caucasians for the last four years. My method 
is as follows: 

USES A TWEIiVE-FRAMZ: HIVE. 

In the spring, after the frost is out and the earth has settled, 
my hives are made perfectly level — use a spirit-level and make no 
mistake. I use a 12-frame hive with frames made flush with the 
top. My hives all face East and use a double super which is the 
exact size of the hive, 83/2 inches deep with flat tins lyi inches wide. 
Spaced 4^ inches from center to center and nailed on the bottom 
of the super on which the double set of 96 sections rest, I use 
454>^-i/'4^1/^ 4-bee way sections and space my brood frames 1^4 
inches from center to center. Therefore, when this double super is 
put on the bee ways in the sections come in conjunction with the 
bee ways between the brood combs. Therefore we have a contin- 
uous bee-way from the bottom board to the top of the super — an 
ideal condition for super work. You will see there is no bee space 
whatever between the sections and the brood frames, only the 
thickness of the flat tins. I use nearly full sheets of foundation in 



52 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




3 

3 



y/f//:^////y//M 



The Hive that J. W. Blakely Uses. 



tions to force thorn 
to swarm, if possible. 
This is very essen- 
tial in this locality, 
for if a colony di- 
vides its force l:»y 
swarming "the fat is 
in the fire." 

As far as surplus 
honey is concerned, 
when they do swarm 
I hive them in reg- 
ular hives or impro- 
vised boxes, and at 
evening I set this 
hive or box on top 
of the parent hive, 
entrance facing west. 
I leave them this way 
for four days. At 
evening of the fourth 



sections and bait- 
combs in the upper 
row of sections in 
this double super and 
the bees begin at the 
top first. I have 
never yet found brood 
or pollen in sections 
when working this 
method. I do not 
use queen excluders 
or separators, the 
sections are so nar- 
row and the hive be- 
ing set perfectly level. 
With nearly full 
sheets of foundation 
I have produced ex- 
tra fine honey by 
this method. 



SWA.RMING XKCOXTRAGES. 

I want my bees to 
swarm : in fact I 
bring about condi- 





J. W. Blakely's Double Depth Super 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 53 

liay I set tlie new swarm carefully to one side. As I said before, my 
liives face east. I now tip the hive south anrl put a stick 20 inches 
long and one inch square between the bottom board and hive on 
the north. Tip hive north and put another stick of same dimensions 
under south edge of hive. I now have two entrances, the east one 
J^g. the west one even one inch the whole width of the hive. I 
uow open this hive and destroy all queen cells and shake the bees 
m the grass a few feet east of the hive, replace frames, put on 
<louble super and hive cover. I now shake the new swarm at the 
west entrance, and the family, mother and all, are once more united. 
The bees that came out with the swarm will all work from the 
west entrance and take to the super at once. The two large entrances 
afford plenty of ventilation. The big super gives plenty of room. 
The swarming fever has abated, they having fulfilled the law of 
Nature. The remaining bees have lost their cells and gladly wel- 
come their mother back to her former domicile. 

GOOD KES-UIiTS. 

I produced 80 pounds of honey this year from my best queen 
by this method. 60 pounds of this honey was Xo. 1 and sold to our 
grocer at ,20c per lb., 15 lbs. Xo. 2 sold at 18c, the balance was cut 
out and sold or used at home. 28 pounds was the least any colonies 
made handled in the above manner. 

X'one of the colonies worked by this method swarmed or pre- 
pared to swarm the second time. I am satisfied that the Caucasians 
properly handled will give excellent results, as this was the poorest 
honey year in this vicinity we have had fc^r the last decade. 

Cardington, Ohio. 

[I can imagine some of my subscribers, when they read the 
above article, saying, ''Whew, a double depth super on a twelve 
frame hive ! \\'hy 1 wouldn't have a thing like that in my yard if 
you would give it to me." But wait a minute. 

A few years ago we thought that to get the best results from 
our bees we must always put the empty super under the half-filled 
one. In no case was the empty super to go on top. unless at the 
end of the flow. Xow we find leading bee men putting the empty 
super on top always, and find it a decided advantage. I could men- 
tion many other things of a similar nature. 

Some time ago. when first becoming interested m bees. I was 
driving through northern ]^Iichigan. and came across a bunch of 
bees located near a logging camp. These bees Avere in chaff hives. 
held ten frames, and the super covered the entire top of the hive, 
both frames and the part packed with chaff. \\'e have been told 
that bees would not fill those sections well that were not directly 
above the brood nest, but this man evident) v found out thev would. 



54 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

\\'hile at the last ^lichigan convention I found a man who is 
practicing- practically the same plan, and if I can ever get him 
cornered I am going to find out just how he does it and let you 
know. He gave me an invitation to visit him, so my chance is 
good unless he reads this article before I get there. 

All this goes to show that we should take but little for granted. 
Because ninety-nine people say it is so doesn't make it so. The 
one hundredth may prove the ninety-nine are wrong. I shouldn't 
wonder if we would hear from others who are using a double super 
successfullv.l 



Swarming and Swarm Control. 

W. C. LYMAN. 

' •!/ DO XOT at the present time look upon swarming as an 
^jl instinct of the bees for increase, but I would consider it to be 
a provision of X^ature for their distribution. Perhaps you would 
call the difference a small one, and yet right on that small difference 
hinges the idea of swarm control; for if swarming is not an instinct 
of increase, but is the result of conditions, it follows that if we 
remove the conditions which would cause bees to swarm, and yet 
leave to them the full use of their instinct of increase, no swarming- 
will take place ; and for about ten years that I have been experi- 
menting along this line I have found such to be the fact. 

CAUSE or SWARJkXXNG. 

Swarming is a complex proposition, and its causes are numer- 
ous, so I will not take up time with it now. but will only say that 
for those causes with which we are mainly concerned, go to a hive 
from which a prime swarm has issued under normal conditions, and 
study carefully the conditions you find there ; and for those conditions 
which will satisfy the bees and tend to prevent swarming, go to the 
hive in which, under ordinary conditions, you would hive a prime 
swarm, and study carefully the conditions you find there. 

Now it is true that there is once in a while a hive containing 
bees in which the size of the hive, the capacity of the queen, the 
ratio of her egg laying to the hatching of the brood, the arrangement 
of the supers, and the temperature and ventilation, are all so nicely 
balanced that no swarming results during the season. 

And there is also once in a while an apiarist like Dr. Miller who, 
while trying to breed up a strain of non-swarming bees, is at the 
same time such an expert at establishing favorable conditions and 
obtaining results, that one is a little puzzled to determine just how 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



55 




No. 1. Used by ^\'. C. Lyman for Swarm Control. 

far he has advanced in inducing" the bees not to swarm under 
nnfavorahlc conditions. 

To one who, like myself, is neither a scientist or an expert, it 
seems easier to obtain results desired, by conforming as far as 
possible to the desires of the bees ; and indeed it may be possible to 
do so, and at the same time to secure all the necessary results of 
successful bee culture. 



AFFIiIAlTCES SHCUIiS BE SIMPIiE. 

The idea of swarm control is not new. nor are appliances cal- 
culated to control or prevent swarming" new. nor are such appliances 
now put into successful use for the first time. 

There is however an idea in apiculture that is very old — and 
very good. I might call it perhaps the bee keeper's Ride of Three, 
and it might be stated in this form: A hive, some bees, and a field 
of flowers — those three things we want, and we want as little else 
as circumstances will permit. In the field of invention simplicity 
of construction, and use. usually comes last and is the hardest to 
obtain. 

Applying this idea to bee hives I believe that what bee keepers 
want is the strongest and most simple constritction that is possible; 
and that any special fixtures that are to be used for certain purposes 
during a portion of the year, should be so made that they can be 
Taid aside at all other times, without interfering in any way with 
the construction or use of the hive. 



56 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




ARE BEES 7AB-SIGHTED? 

Bees seems to no- 
tice changes made in 
the position of their 
hive less, when the 
change is made in 
the direction of the 
line of flight in which 
they approach the 
hive, than they do 
when the change is 
made so that they 
have to turn aside 
from their accustomed 
line of flight. Also 
each bee has its ac- 
customed alio'htin"' No. 2. a Swarm Controlling Arrangement. 

point, and direction of flight from and to the hive, so that a change 
made in a portion of the entrance, if the entrance is 'a large one, will 
confuse a part of the bees, while others are not affected by it. 

How much of the confusion of bees, caused by changes in their 
hive, or its entrance, is caused by their eyesight, I have not been 
able to determine ; but it seems to me to have something to do with 
it, and I have wondered whether bees can see plainly at a long 
distance, and not plainly at other shorter distances. There appears 
to be a point near the hive, as they approach it, in which they do 
not see well at all. 

Why is it that the guards at the entrance apparently pay so 
little attention to other bees, flies, ants, etc., by sight, but usually 
bump up against them before they seem to know what they are? 

It is a safe rule to make as few changes as possible when the 
bees are busv at work. 



HIVE MA1TIFUI.ATION FOB SWABM CONTBOI.. 

I have been much interested in hive manipulation for the pur- 
pose of swarm control. 

It is now nearly ten years that I have been experimenting in 
that line, and the first American Bee Journal for 1904, and the June, 
1907, Bee Keeper's Review, contain articles giving some of my 
experience. 

I have made changes nearly every year in the details of my 
method, and the fixtures described in this article dift"er from others 
used. I'revious to the season of 1903 I made a special bottom board 
to L'C used for the ])urpose of swarm control, which could be used 
throughcut the year for all purposes for which a bottom board is 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 57 

used, and which is simple and effective when used for swarm con- 
trol, and I could not make a better one at the present time; yet I 
have iicxer described it for public use, because it is one of those 
special articles which require time and money to make, and because 
the I'.-inciples on which it is based can be carried out with some of 
the l-(>ttom boards already in common use. 

THE BEST BOTTOM BOARD TO USB. 

'J he l)est one for that purpose is one which I think is made by 
i:early all bee supply firms, and is the one having a J/g bee space on 
one side, and a ^4, space on the other, with the open or entrance 
ends facing- in opposite directions, and the side parts of the rimsi 
extending the full length of the board. The bottom board of this 
kind made by the Root Company has the side rims cut short at the 
length of the brood chamber only, so that while it can be used for 
this plan of swarm control, by making the other fixtures suited to 
it, it is decidedly inconvenient to tier up with in the cellar, for 
wintering with the bottom boards left on, for with such covers as 
the Excelsior the back end of the hive drops down, slanting the 
hive toward the back end, and that slant increases with each hive 
added to the pile. 

HOW TO USE THESE BOTTOM BOARDS. 

To use these bottom boards for swarm control, take three of 
them, and after removing the hive to be operated on from its stand, 
place one of them on the stand in its natural position, with the %■ 
side up, on this, also in its natural position place another with the 
}i side up. There is now between the two bottoms an open space 
or runway 1^ in, high and as wide as the bottoms, with an open- 
ing at the front and back ends, of Js i"- hy the width of the bot- 
tom boards. 

Next take one of the fixtures shown in cut Xo. 1. in which two 
of the fixtures are shown, one in position for use, and the other 
hanging on the front of the hive so as to show its construction, 
and the two bent tins which slip between the edges of the two 
buttons on the stand to hold the fixture in place when in use. 

The fixture is just a wooden rim with screen wire nailed on 
the front side of it, and two or more notches cut in the upper edge 
next the wire, big enough for bees to pass through, drones and all : 
on the back side, or that side which goes next to the ends of the 
two bottom boards, are nailed two bent tins, to stick between the 
ends of the two bottoms so that the fixture will stay put when in 
use. The fixture is made just high enough so that its upper edge, 
wken in place, comes just even or fiush with the floor surface of 
the upper of the two bottoms. 



58 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




Tuc Home of the Carniolans. 

{C(iui//'sv, hiipei ial-Royal Af;) . Ass'n.) 



All the fixtures required for tliis plan of swarm control should 
not cost more, I think, than about ."i cents per hive. 

MANIFUI.ATIONS NECESSARY. 

As I started to say, after placing- the two bottoms on the stand, 
put one of the fixtures at the front end of them, with the bent tins 
between them, and the w^ire side out or to the front, and the escape 
holes or notches for the bees at the top, as shown in cut No. 1. 

Next put a l)rood chamber, ])repared as for hivins^ a swarm, on 
the two bottoms; in it put the queen from the hive that you are 
working at, and a frame of l)rood if you like, and put on the honey 
board and all the supers. 

This leaves only the brovxl chamber frt)m which you have re- 
moved the cpieen to be provided for. Place it on the stand directly 
behind the hive that you have just fixed, with its bottom board ^s 
side up, and its front end. that is, the front end of the bottom board, 
tig-ht up against the back end of the two bottoms under the front 
hive, and raised on pieces of board % in. so that the floor of the 
back brood chamber comes flush with the opening- between the two 
front bottom boards. Put on the cover of the rear brood chamber, 
and close up the space oxcv the front end of the rear bottom board. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 59 

between the two hives, with a piece of board cut for that purpose, 
and you are done. The hive is now as shown complete in cut No. 2^ 
and as the brood hatches out in the rear brood chamber, and the 
bees wish to fly, they do so, passing out between the two bottom 
boards under the front hive to the screen front and out near the 
entrance to the front hive, and the most of them cjuietly unite with 
those in the front hive. 
Downer's Grove, 111. 

[I don't know that I should comment on the alcove plan, for,. 
having never tried it, what I would say would be only a guess, but 
I should "guess" that the average bee-keeper numbering his colonies 
by the hundreds, would prefer a plan that only required the original 
hive, or at best an extra hive body, ^^'hile at first it would seem 
that the screen front is all that is needed, a careful analysis will 
show that in addition to that there are an extra hive body, one 
extra cover and two extra bottom boards. This, of course, does not 
mean that the plan outlined does not have its good features, for it 
has, and I have no doubt but what it will do all the writer claims 
for it.] 



Strengthening Foundation By Painting With Wax. 

O. O. POPPLETON. 

■^^^ HE most serious difficulty in the use of foundation in brood 
\^J combs has been its tendency to stretch or sag, causing the 
combs to warp and bulge out of shape and the cells in the 
upper half of the comb to be stretched into different sizes and 
shapes, thus making very imperfect combs. The wiring of frames 
and the use of splints have been much in use to prevent this 
stretching. I have had no practical experience with splints, and 
wiring has not been fully satisfactory in my work. 

Some 30 years ago I used some foundation made on Oliver 
Foster's plaster molds. One set of molds I used made the founda- 
tion much thicker one edge than was the other, and when hung on 
frames with the thick edge up, was almost absolutely free from 
stretching; while other foundation that was of same thickness,. 
both edges, was not free from trouble. 

In 1888 I took charge of a large Apiary near Havana, Cuba, 
in which was used a Given press. This, old-time bee-keepers re- 
member, pressed the dipped sheets of wax between two plates, 
operated by a strong knuckle joint. By using the dipping boards 
side down instead of end down, they could be dipped only part way 
in the melted wax, after the entire jjoard had been properly dipped ; 
thus leaving the sheets of wax much thicker on one edge than they 



60 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

were on the other. While all press foundations have some serious 
faults, yet the foundation made on the press entirely does away 
with the stretching. The two experiences with the press and the 
plaster molds showed that foundation could be made entirely free 
from the stretching fault, without at the same time materially 
adding to the amount of wax used, as the lower half of the founda- 
tion could be as much lighter as the upper half would be heavier. 
On coming back to the States from Cuba, I called the atten- 
tion of one or two of the largest manufacturers of foundation to 
the matter and asked if they could roll the foundation with one 
thicker edge, 1:)ut they replied, giving a mechanical reason why it 
couldn't be done, and the subject was dropped. 

FAIirriNG THE FOUNDATION WITH "WAX. 

Some six or eight years ago, I received a letter from Mr. Henry 
Yogeler of California, asking me to experiment with a method he 
had had patented, of painting the upper part of sheets of founda- 
tion with melted wax for the purpose of strengthening the same. 
I saw at once that this would probably do the work I had wished 
to have done and a thorough test proved very satisfactory. I have 
now used the method in my own Apiaries for several years, and 
consider it indispensible. While it don't, at least with my l?-inch 
deep frames, do absolutely away with all stretching, it does come 
so near ending the difficulty that about all practical trouble in that 
line is done away with. 

In practice I use a shallow wax-dish over a small oil stove, 
keeping the wax melted, but no hotter than is necessary to do that, 
and with a two-inch flat paint brush paint this hot wax over such 
part of the foundation as one wishes. The brush should be freed 
from any dripping wax by lightly brushing it over edge of the dish, 
then quickly over the foundation with a few light strokes first, then 
finish with several heavy strokes well bearing down on the brush. 
This leaves quite a rim of wax on the side walls, the more the 
better. It is somewhat of a knack to do the painting just right, 
but practice will soon teach one just the right touch. I usually 
paint at least half way down each sheet of foundation on both sides, 
but more will do no harm. Foundation made by the use of the 
Weed process of sheeting the wax seems to stand up much better 
than when sheeted by any other process. 

FEESINa WAX TO BEES. 

Several methods have been devised and some of them patented 
for feeding; back wax to the bees for them to use over again in 
building combs, but so far as I know none have been successful. 
Thi;- painting process not only strengthens combs, but seems to be 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 61 

o. practical method of giving- wax to bees to l)e worked over again. 
So far as I have observed, bees seem to use substantially all the 
painted wax given them, thus saving the expense of having them 
secrete so much new wax. 

Miami, Florida. 

[Mr, Vogeler has sent me samples of the patented wax, and I 
am frank in saying that I believe the plan will do what is claimed 
for it. I have had no chance to try out the plan personally, but if 
a man with the experience that Mr. Poppleton has had pronounces 
the plan good, I am willing to accept his verdict until someone 
proves it wrong. 

While this process is patented (April 17, 1900), I have made 
arrangements with Mr. Vogeler whereby every paid-up subscriber 
of the Review can have the privilege, free, of using the plan on ten 
colonies of bees. This will give an excellent opportunity to test 
the plan in your own apiary, with no expenditure but for the wax 
and brush, I would like to hear from those who try it this sum- 
mer, telling me what success they have with the plan.] 



The Porter Bee-Escape. 

BY ADRIAN GETAZ. 

3 HAVE used the Porter bee-escape since it was invented. My 
first trial was to put the escape board on the brood nest and 
the supers to be emptied on the escape-board. That did not 
work. It took quite a long time for the bees to come out of the 
supers, and sometimes they did not come out at all. On lifting the 
escape board, I always found the underside covered with bees. Evi- 
dently they were blockading the escape and preventing the egress 
of those above. Perhaps those in the supers being thus in '"touch" 
with those below did not feel isolated, and did not see any need of 
coming out. Perhaps both causes contributed to the result. I don't 
know. 

SEFAKATING THE SUPERS FROM THE BROOD NEST. 

-\fter considerable study, I concluded that the thing to do was 
to separate the supers from the brood nest. Consequently I put on 
the brood nest an empty super, then the escape board, and the 
supers to be emptied. That was much better, but did not always 
succeed. When the colonies were very strong and the brood nest 
could not contain all the bees, they started work in the empty super 
and formed a cluster which hung under the escape board and in- 
variably right under the escape itself, thus blockading it completely. 



62 



THE BEE-KEEPERo REVIEW 




The Carniolans Should Be Good Mountains Climbers. 

( Com tt'iy, Royal-Iiiipt'i ial Agi . Ass' >i.) 

The remedy was easily found. Something- was to be provided 
in which they could cluster without hanging to the escape board. 
A super of empty sections is as good as anything else. The pro- 
gram then was to put it on the brood nest, then the completely 
empty super, then the escape-board and finally the supers to be 
cleared on the top. Quite a tower in shape and appearance. 

tboubili: with bubb combs. 

Another trouble, however, soon revealed itself. Frequently 
there is quite an amount of burr comb between the brood-nest and 
the first super. In separating themi these combs break and the 
honey they contain set running, often quite an amount. The result 
is that the bees in the supers above being too few to take care of it^ 
and anxious to get out fail to clean it and often quite a number of 
them get daubed and perish. Those below smelling the honey above 
make frantic efiforts to force an entrance through the escape and 
blockade it completely, usually one or two bees finally getting stuck 
in it. 

All get excited, raise an uproar inside and in front of the hive, 
and attract the robbers if there is any. The best is to adjust the 
whole as above described, but leave the escape board out until the 

{Cojitiniicd on page 77) 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 63 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editor and Publisher 
Office — 230 "VVooillaua Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 



Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1011, at the post office at Detroit, ^Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Discontinuances — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, ar.d a subscriber w'ishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

A«lvertising- rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



W'hat is a failure? It's only a spur 

To a man who receives it aright. 
And it makes the spirit within him stir 

To go in once more and fight. 
If you never have failed, it's an even guess 

You never have won a high success. 

— Ed III II lid J^aiicc Cooler. 



It is not what }-ou get, but what ynu expect to get, that makes 
life worth livinu'. 



Bee-Keepers' Convention at London, Ont. 

I am looking forward to a pleasant meeting with the bee- 
keepers at their convention to be held in Toronto, in the Council 
Chambers, on February 29th and March 1st. An interesting pro- 
i^ram has been prepared, and besides myself there will be O. L. 
Hershiser from this side of the line. 

The first session will begin at 1:30 p. m., the 29th. second at 
7 p. m., third at 9 a. m. the 1st, and last at 1 :30 p. m. Full pro- 
gram can be had by addressing the secretary, D. Anguish. Lambeth, 
Ont. 



Wisconsin State Bee-Keepers' Convention. 

According- to a printed letter from the Secretary, Gus Dittmer, 
the Wisconsin bee-keepers will hold their annual convention in the 
Supervisors' room at the Court House, Madison, Wisconsin, on 
February 20th and 21st. beginning at 10 a. m. the 20th. 



64 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

No program is given but the letter states that the main fea- 
ture of their conventions has been the question box, and asks the 
members to come prepared with questions. This ought to be a 
live convention, judging" by the large number of progressive bee- 
keepers in that state. 

Imperial County, California, Establishes Quarantine Against 
Importation of Bees. 

]\Ir. A. F. ^^'ag■ner. inspector of apiaries of Imperial County, 
California, informs me that the Board of Supervisors of Imperial 
County have just passed an ordinance, which becomes effective 
February 1, 191"^, preventing bees from being brought into the 
county from infected counties. He states that Imperial County 
contains about 11,000 colonies of bees, and with the prospects of a 
poor season in coast counties, there was danger of importing brood 
diseases. Any violation of the ordinance is punishable by fine or 
imprisonment, or both. 

Another California County Taking Precaution. 

Those California bee-keepers evidently do not intend to be 
taken unawares. E. F. McDonald, of Santa Paula, writes me that 
the \'entura County Bee-Keepers' Club at their meeting held at 
Fillmore, January 6th, voted to unite in a body w'ith the California 
State Association, and also upheld Inspector Allen in the matter of 
quarantining of all bees and queens from outside of the county on 
account of brood disease. All queens and bees now shipped into 
Ventura County must bear an inspector's certificate or they will 
be destroyed when they arrive. Good work, boys. 



The World is Small After All. 

This month there reached my desk the second copy of the 
South African Bcc-Kccpcrs' Journal. I picked it up. glanced through 
its pages, and the thought struck me at once that we are not living- 
in such a large world after all. I have often thought of Africa 
as a place w^here we send missionaries and where Dr. Livingston 
became lost among the savages, but upon looking at the full page 
cut on page 56, I found men and women wearing the same dress 
and with just as intelligent looks as any people I had seen in 
America. 

Of course, this will show my African brothers that I know 
very little about their country, but I am sure from the start the 
journal has made, and with the Bee-Keepers' Association back of 
it, it ought to have a very bright future. Here's success to you. 
Brother Oettle. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 65 

Should Labels Show Where Honey is Produced? 

A Cleveland grocer suggests that there should be a national law 
wkich would require that all honey should be labeled so as to show 
the state it was produced in. To me this seems like a good sug- 
gestion. Honey produced in different states has a flavor peculiar 
to that state. One who has become accustomed to eating the 
honey of a particular flavor is apt to be disappointed if he gets some 
that has a different flavor, even though the latter may be of an 
excellent quality and grade. If all honey was labeled to show in 
what state it was produced, it would allow the bee-keepers of any 
state to build up a demand for their particular flavor, and would 
get dififerent states to competing with each other in regard to 
quality. Of course there are arguments on the other side. 



Clover One Year Old. 



Geo. Shiber, Randolph, N. Y.. writes me as follows 
■'In the December Review, page ii-i-t, it strikes me you are 
in error. You speak of the fact that next year will be a good time 
to prove whether clover yields the first year, etc. My experience 
has been, and I believe it has been so held by many writers, that 
by clover yielding the first year means plants that grow from seed 
that year." 

Now friend Shiber, I haven't understood it that way, and now 
is a good time to get it settled. Let us ask the rest of the sub- 
scribers. How many understand the matter the same as Friend 
Shiber? My understanding is that we could not very well look for 
honey from baby clover plants the year they were born, but that 
the next year, or when they were one year old they would yield, 
but some writers have given me the impression that they could 
not be depended on until the second year. 



Those Picture Grading Rules. 

Since the January issue was mailed, one extensive buyer of 
honey wrote me that I was making a big error in the illustrations 
shown. He writes that I should show the "high ideals." He says 
that as a rule bee-keepers have low grades of honey, and according 
to my illustration will understand that number two is a fancy 
grade. 

A subscriber, on the other hand, writes that the pictures will 
help him in grading his honey, and then goes on to ask regarding 
the siac and zvcight of sections according to the difl'erent grades. 
He states that he has been in the habit of grading all his 12-ounce 
sections by themselves, the 12y2 by themselves, and so on up for 
everv half ounce. 



66 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

For a long time I have suspected that we would be surprised 
if we knew how the printed grading rules were interpreted. In 
Cider to find out just how the matter does stand I am in hopes that 
I will get many letters regarding those pictures. I really expected 
when I put them at the head of the honey quotations, that they 
would stir up a discussion, and I hope I was not wrong. \\'hen 
I get the matter pretty well presented by both buyer and seller, I 
will give you a sum-up in the Review. If those pictures are not 
a fair representation we want to know it, and if they are they will 
help wonderfullv the bee-keeper who wants to grade correctly. I 
will confess that it was sometimes a puzzler to me to know how to 
grade by reading the i)rinted rules we have had. 



Buying Bees South to Move North in the Spring. 

There is a field that up to this time is practically unexplored. 
That field is in buying bees in the south in the spring, and shipping 
them north for the honey flow. Already there is a slight move in 
that direction, as I have learned recently of two or three bee-keepers 
who will try it out this year. Besides some have already tried it 
in previous years, and while there are no doubt many things con- 
ducive to failure, yet it seems to me that the principle is good, and 
I would not be surprised to see it developed into a big industry in 
a few years. 

In order that something may be known definitely as to what 
can be done, I would like some of my southern subscribers to 
write me telling just what bees can be bought for in their locality, 
where one is willing to take them in any kind of a box or hive. 
If the plan is ])ractical, let's develop it. 



Association of Apiary Inspectors of the United States and Canada. 

The following from Dr. E. F. Phillips is self explanatory. The 
Review wishes to commend the movement and stands ready to do 
anything it can to further the same. The letter is as follows : 

On December 30th, 1911, in Washington, D. C, there was 
formed a temporary organization of the above name with a view 
to increasing the efficiency of apiary inspection and to bring about 
a greater uniformitv in the laws and more active co-operation be- 
tween the various inspectors. 

A committee on permanent organization was formed to report 
at a meeting to be held in Cleveland, Ohio, in December, 1912, 
in connection with the meeting of the Association of Economic 
Entomologists. Prof, ^^'ilmon Howell, College Station, Texas, is 
chairman of this committee. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 67 

A standing committee was also appointed on legislation for the 
purpose of drawing up a law incorporating the necessary and de- 
sirable features. The undersigned was appointed chairman of this 
committee. 

. All apiary inspectors and official entomologists of the United 
States and Canada who are interested in the advancement of apicul- 
ture are invited and urged to join in this movement for an in- 
creased efficiency in the fight against the brood diseases. For the 
present it was decided to levy an assessment of $1 per year on each 
member to pay necessary expenses. It is hoped that arrangements 
may later be perfected for affiliation with the Association of Eco- 
nomic Entomologists. Requests for membersliip and the assess- 
ment may be sent to the undersigned. 

Respectfully, 

E. F. Phillips, 

Secretary. 
Bureau of Entomology, Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Burtox X. Gatks, 
Amherst. Mass. 

Chairman. 



What the National Bee-Keepers' Association Will Do This Year. 

As every bee-keeper knows, the meeting of the Board of Direc- 
tors, held in Detroit, January 23, was probably the most important 
of any Board meeting held in the history of the Association. Plans 
of re-organization had to be considered, as well as just what the 
Association Avould and should do for its members. 

One of the most important needs of the bee-keepers, as it 
appeared to the Directors, was an accurate knowledge of crop condi- 
tions. To get this, it was decided to send out crop reports early in 
the season to every member and from the information so obtained, 
advise the members, either direct or through the Bee Journals, as 
to the conditions. -. 

The Board also found that the question of honey packages was 
an important one. At the present time, there is not near the uni- 
formity there should be. Xo special weight of tin or size of can 
has been adopted in the past and many shippers were using a tin 
entirely too light. Samples of honey-cans were inspected by the 
Board with the decision that the Secretary be instructed to make 
the best possible arrangements for furnishing the members with 
the tin hone3'-packages the coming season. The orders wall be 
handled directly through the Association office and will not be sent 
by the member to the can manufacturers as in the past. 



68 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

In discussing the question of packages for comb honey, and 
realizing that there are a number of different kinds and shapes in 
the market, it was thought best that in order to promote uniformity 
of a comb honey package, the Association should take steps to 
secure for its members, at the lowest possible prices, the double 
tier, 2-i-lb. shipping case, which was adopted by the Association at 
its last convention. 

These cases should be furnished according to specifications so 
that every member buying through the National, would be using 
exactly the same case as every other member. In order to induce 
a more general adoption, it was thought advisable to furnish them 
at a low price. The Secretary was also instructed to investigate 
paper shipping-cases, as well as glass packages. This action was 
not taken with a idea of getting into the supply business, but to 
promote the using of uniform packages by the members, which then 
will simplify the queston of marketing and eventually raise the price 
the bee-keepers can obtain. 

The question of marketing honey was thoroughly considered 
and many plans were presented. The one finally decided upon was 
that for the coming season, the National Association^ should act in 
the capacity of a broker for its members where desired. 

It is not expected or desired that all members will ship their 
honey through the Association, but realizing that many are not in 
touch with the best markets, it was thought that no better move 
could be made then to assist these members in obtaining the proper 
return for their honey crop. To do this selling agencies will be 
established in several of the larger cities, and the sales will be 
directed through the Association. A member ha\ing honey to sell 
could first get instructions from the Secretary, who is expected to 
keep in close touch with market conditions, take into consideration 
the feiglit rates, and then give the member full instructions as to 
shipment. The Association does not intend to buy and sell honey, 
but simply to assist the producers in finding the best possible market. 

The promotion of local branches will be encouraged and 
wherever a local ])ranch desires to get out a booklet, such as has 
been used by the Michigan Association, assistance will be given b\' 
the National Association. This feature will be encouraged. The 
advertising of this booklet will be cared for by the National, but 
\y\\\ probably be confined to the four Bee Journals, on the start. 



National Committee on Legislation Already Busy. 

That President York selected wisely when naming the National 
Legislative Committee, as mentioned on page 344 of last Review, 
is proven by the fact that they are already at work. Chairman W. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 69 

A. Selser, in writing me under date of December loth, stated tliat the 
committee called on Secretary Wilson the l:?th, after a meeting- was 
held in the parlors of the St. James Hotel, and presented their 
request. Later that request was presented in writing, and is given 
herewith. The committee also passed a resolution urging the Na- 
tional to hold its next convention in Washington, believing that by 
so doing greater pressure can be brought to bear in the interests of 
national legislation for bee-keepers. The letter sent Secretary Wil- 
son reads as follows : 

December 13, 1911. 
Honorable Jas. Wilson, Sec. of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 

Honored Sir: — 

In response to your request of the Legislative Committee of the 
National Bee Keepers' Association, that visited you on the twelfth 
inst., that we repeat in writing our request, that you so kindly prom- 
ised to do what you could to aid us in. In view of the fact that the 
various states are not issuing bulletins and disseminating knowledge 
on the subject, it becomes necessary for us to make the special appeal 
to the Federal Government. 

First — That you instruct your department to send the Farmers' 
Bulletin, 442, on Foul Brood to every farmer who keeps bees in the 
I'uited States, there being a decrease largely on account of this dis- 
ease of nearly a million hives of bees since last census, that the 
danger of spread in healthy locations, makes it necessary to have 
ever}' bee keeper informed of the symptoms, and the treatment of 
the disease. 

Second — That you also instruct yottr department to issue a 
statement to all county papers, warning the bee keepers of the dan- 
ger of the disease, and that they could have a bulletin for the ask- 
ing, that would be helpful to them, as well as their neighbor bee- 
keepers. 

Third — That your department be allowed to send out an ad- 
vanced card to the bee-keepers, enlightening them as to the nature 
of the disease and the bulletin published. 

Fourth — That your department issue a Farmers" Bulletin stat- 
ing the relation of bees to horticulture, and the danger of spraying 
fruit trees while in bloom, as being fatal to the bees, which are so 
essential to them. 

Fiftli — That your department issue a Farmers' Bulletin giving 
the nutritious value of honey as a food, and some receipts as to its 
present unknown uses in food preparation, as very helpful to the 
citizens of the L'nited States in general. 

{Co?itinued on page J4) 



70 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



SELECTED ARTICLES 

AND EDITORIAL COMMENTS 



Gigantic Industry Is Built Up by California Fruit Growers' Exchange 

Just now, when co-operation is l)eing' considered by bee-keepers 
all over the country, it occurred to me that the readers would be 
interested in knowing what is being accomplished along this line by 
the California Fruit Growers. I am indebted to ^Ir. James K. Hed- 
strom for the following clipping taken from the Los Angeles Exam- 
iner: 

For eighteen years the California Fruit Growers' Exchange has 
waged a persistent campaign of advertising for the citrus growers of 
California. During this time the Exchange has l^een one of the lead- 
ing factors in bringing fruit growers to the state and in scattering 
the fame of the California orange belt all over the world. The Cal- 
ifornia orange, largely through the efforts of the California Fruit 
Growers' Exchange, has become as common in the large centers of 
the middle west and east as the apple — and this means millions of 
dollars annually to the citrus growers of this state. 

The objects of the exchange have been and are to teach the 
grower to economize in the growing, marketing and packing of the 
fruit ; to encourage the improvement of the product and to widen 
the distribution, and increase the consumption in order to take care 
of the rapidly increasing crop, this latter by advertising and placing 
salaried representatives in the consuming centers who work solely 
for the exchange and devote their entire time toward boosting Cal- 
ifornia citrus fruits. 

These are the principal objects and purposes as set forth by 
the exchange : 

To lessen the cost of marketing l)y creating agencies who will 
act for each member. 

To insure the collection of sales. 

To facilitate the collection of damage claims. 

To encourage the improvement of the product and the package. 

To increase the consumption of citrus fruit by developing new 
markets and to aid in supplying all the people with good fruit at 
a reasonable price. 

To secure a fair and just government of all bodies affiliated with 
these parties, democratic in principle and through which at all times 
policies shall be controlled by the majority will of the shippers con- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 71 

iiected therewith in just proportion to shipments made. That the 
lousiness engaged in, being inter-state in character, to secure at all 
times full compliance with the laws of the United States concerning 
interstate commerce, and to that end prevent any organization con- 
nected therewith from having any power or authority in contraven- 
tion of the laws of the United States concerning such business. The 
general plan being to unite in securing those results which are ben- 
eficial to all alike, but at the same time preserving to each shipper 
<'omplete independence of action as to all of his shipments. There- 
upon the following stipulations are agreed to in lieu of all previous 
agreements. 

First — The party of the first part shall be considered the general 
agent of all the parties of the second part in all matters concerning 
the marketing of citrus fruit, and such other matters as are incident 
thereto within the limitations hereinafter pro^•lded, with power to 
provide a suitable place for doing business. 

To elect or appoint a suitable official force to supervise the bus- 
iness, at such salaries as may from time to time be considered proper 
hv the directors of the party of the tirst part. 

To employ a force of sales agents stationed at various points 
throughout the United States. Canada, and such other countries as 
may be decided upon as will be sufficient to dispose of the products 
of the second parties in all available territory. 

To organize and maintain a claim department for the handling 
of all claims. 

To maintain a legal department to take care of the necessary 
litigation, and furnish advice to the various organizations connected 
herewith. 

To maintain an advertising bureau for the purpose of stimulat- 
ing consumption and demand. 

To create any other department, or incur an}- other expense 
which may be deemed necessary by the board of directors of the 
party of the first part to protect all those interests of the parties of 
•.he second part of a general nature, and which will affect all alike, 
Avithin the scope of the duties of the first party as herein provided. 
Through more extensive advertising on the part of the exchange 
<luring the last year than ever before, and through the widest and 
most even distribution ever known in all markets at all times, the 
consuming public has had continuously brought to its attention the 
fact that California has oranges and lemons in quantity to sell and 
that the public can always get them at attractive prices. The result 
has been that California fruit has brought fair mone}- and the season 
has proved a satisfactory one to all growers. 

During the past year the exchange has handled 1,842.831 boxes, 
or 28,1:?:3 cars, as against T,5T8,801 boxes, or 19,639 cars the previous 



72 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

season — an increase of over 43 per cent. The percentage of the 
whole California crop shipped through the exchange has increased 
slightly, being over Gl per cent, as against a little less than GO per 
cent the year before. Of all citrus fruits consumed in the United 
States, the California Fruit Growers' Exchange has handled about 
40 per cent of the oranges and 35 per cent of the lemons. 

For this fruit, the exchange has brought into California in cash 
$20,708,355 — the average price for every box handled being $1.1)1 f. 
o. b. the cars. 

During the past year the exchange has handled 10,842,831 jjoxes, 
have been sold through the exchange nearly 50,000,000 boxes of or- 
anges and lemons, for which there has been brought to California in 
cash about $90,500,000, with losses through failure to collect or in 
transmission of the funds of less than $6,000. 

The following table shows the ngures of each year in boxes, 
with the amount of cash received for the same, the average price a 
box f. o. b. California, and the losses : 

F. O. B. Aver- 

Boxcs. Returns. age. Loss. 

1904-5 5.188,511 $ r.l24,3T7.00 $1.37. $ 458.04 

1905- G 4,705,515 9,936,497.00 2.11 .00 

1906-7 6,149,708 12,268,752.00 2.00 .00 

1907-8 6,628,644 11,753,544.00 1.77 81.85 

1908-9 8,710,828 13,958.990.00 1.60 4,297.57 

1^^09-10 7,578,801 14,831,975.00 1.96 732.32 

1910-11 10,842,831 20,708,355.00 1.91 .00 

Totals 49,804.838 $90,582,480.00 $1.80 $5,569.78 

The shipments for this entire period have been approximately 
one-sixth lemons, one-eighth A'alencia late oranges and the balance 
nearly all navel oranges. 

One year ago G. Harold Powell took charge of the afifairs of 
the Citrus Protective League as manager. With the great problems 
of freight rates and tariff duties, as well as other matters of impor- 
tance continually before them, the growers are to be congratulated 
in obtaining the exclusive services of one so competent to handle 
these questions as Mr. Powell. 

In freight rate cases, nothing decisive has resulted during the 
past year. The lemon rate matter is now before the interstate com- 
merce court, and the refrigeration rate matter has been sent back to 
the commission by that court for further hearing. It is likely to be 
a year or two before those questions are finally determined. 

In tariff matters, the remarkable eft'orts during the last few 
months of the importers at Xew York to entirely wipe out or greatly 
reduce the rate of dutv on citrus fruits have been successfullv blocked 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 73 

for the time being, fur which the growers are greatly indebted to the 
Citrus Protective League and the California Fruit Growers' Ex- 
change. This question has not yet been settled, but the Citrus Pro- 
tective League expects to be aljle, through data it has gathered in 
this and other countries at great expense and efifort, to convince con- 
gress that the California citrus industries are entitled to an adequate 
rate of duty. 

The California Fruit Growers' Exchange is purely a brokerage 
business established for the sole benefit of the fruit growers. It is 
conducted at actual cost of operation, and through which the grow- 
ers themselves direct the distribution and sale of their fruits. Its 
duties and efforts, therefore, lie not in actually shipping and selling 
fruit, but in establishing and keeping at the highest grade of. effici- 
ency possible all its departments and offices, so that the fruit grow- 
ers may be sure of the best service obtainable. 

The first meeting of the fruit growers of Southern California 
was held in Los Angeles on October 25, 1885. The industry at that 
time was in a chaotic state and the delegates to the meeting by a 
formal resolution recognized the fact that unless some united action 
was taken to improve the methods used in marketing their fruit the 
future of the industry w^ould be seriously jeopardized. 

Sessions were held forenoons, afternoons and nights for several 
days, which resulted in the organization of the Orange Growers' 
Protective Union. The results for the first year were very advan- 
tageous, but after an existence of several years the union was lit- 
erally hammered to pieces by commission men and buyers, who were 
able to make larger profits by forcing the growlers to dispose of their 
fruits singly. 

From the time the union dissolved until April, 1893, the growers 
were practically portioned out among the private shipping firms, 
none of whom would invade the other's territory. At this time, and 
for one or two years previous, certain sections, or districts, had 
formed associations in a small w^ay and w'ere marketing their fruit 
through the officers of the association. As a rule they received much 
better results than the individual shipper, which led them to believe 
that their beginning, although small and weak, was along the right 
line. This step marks the commencement of co-operative marketing 
of citrus fruits in California. 

Then the California Fruit Growers' Exchange came into exist- 
ence and has placed the citrus industry on its present high plane. 

The California Fruit Growlers' Exchange shortly after its organ- 
ization and the adoption of its declaration of principles, recommended 
the organization of associations and district exchanges. This w^as 
practically aft'ected in all of the principal fruit growing sections, the 
packing being done by the association at cost and the marketing 



74 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

throiig-h an executive committee composed of one member from each 
district. The marketing- of fruit was continued under this arrange- 
ment only during the seasons of 1893-4 and 1894-5, and, proving 
unsatisfactory, the organization of the Southern California Fruit 
Exchange w^as consummated in 1895, and this organization, in turn, 
was succeeded by the present California Fruit Growers' Exchange, 
to admit of the handling by the exchange of the fruit of the entire 
state. 

Among the important features of the exchange, is the matter of 
purchasing the necessar}- supplies. The P>uit Growers' Supply 
Company was organized in 1907 for the purpose of buying all the 
])acking materials used by the exchange growers. Through it, very 
favorable contracts have been made at fair prices, so that the charg- 
ing of exorbitant prices by the manufacturer and seller has been 
difificult, if not impossible. 

The Porter Bee Escape. 

(Continued /ro>n page 6^) 
running honey is cleaned out, and the excitement has subsided. 
This usually takes about an hour. Then the escape board can be 
put in. About three or four hours at the most are needed for 
emptying the supers of the bees. Often very much less, sometimes 
only half an hour. 

WIDE KIM ON i:3CAFi: BOAKS NEEDED. 

One more precaution must be mentioned. The upper rim of the 
escape-board should not be less than ^4 or V?, n\c\\ thick. With 
thinner rims it might happen, in fact it has happened once with 
me, that the burr combs under the super would touch the escape- 
board perhaps just where the escape is, and close it entirely. 
Knoxville. Tenn. 



National Committee on Legislation Already Busy. 

{Contiujied from page 6g) 
As the committee understands it, the first, second and third were 
in the form of a request, of which, the first you held under advise- 
ment. The second and third you agreed to acquiesce to our request. 
The fourth and fifth were only in the form of a suggestion, and 
you felt also with us that such bulletins would be very helpful, and 
you approved the same. 

The committee desires to thank you for your courteous audience 
given them yesterday, and reiterate the gratitude they feel toward 
your department, in the many ways you have helped us along the 
lines of the bee industry. 

(Signed) Wm. A. Selser^ Philadelphia, Chairman. 
J. H. M. Cook, New York, N. Y. 
N. W. SAUNDER.S, Rockville, Md. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



75 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 

' 1 




FANCY 



NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



By the quotations given below, you will notice that the honey market is still 
in an unsettled condition. Prices remain about the same, but the demand is prac- 
tically at a stand-still. This should pick up, however, during the next two months, 
and it is no doubt advisable for bee-keepers having honey to sell to become active. 
Except in the possible case of off grades, it doesn't seem advisable to shade prices 
any to make sales, neither do we think higher prices can be obtained, owing to 
the prevailing high price at present. If there is any exception to this it would 
be in the case of comb honey of a fancy or number one grade. 

DEN\'ER. — We are quoting our local market 
in a jobbing way as follows: No. 1 white comb, 
per caes of 24 sections, $3,60; No. 1 light am- 
ber. $3.40; No. 2, $3.15. White extracted 
honey per lb., Oc; light amber 8c, and strained 
6J4 to 7y2C. We pay 26c in cash and 28c in 
trade for clean yellow beeswax delivered here. 
THE COLOR.ADO HONEY PRO- 
DUCERS' ASSN. 

Jan. 22. F. Rauchfuss, Mgr. 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey 17c to 
18c. Light amber 16c. Amber 15c. Fancy 
white extracted 10c to lie. Light amber and 
amber extracted Sc to 9c. Wax 30c. 

BLAKE LEE CO., 

Jan. 20. 4 Chatham Row. 



TOLEDO. — Replying to your postal of 
l/18th, beg to advise that there is practically 
no change in quotations from our last. All 
grades of honey are quiet, and owing to cold 
weather, we do not look for any demand until 
the weather moderates. Beeswax is in fair 
demand and brings from 30 to 35c, depending 
on quality. 

Jan. 19th. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 



CINCINNATL — Market on comb honey has 
fallen off somewhat, only demand for fancy 
white, selling in retail way at $4.00, to jobbers 
at $3.60 to $3.75, according to quantity. Extra 
white extracted in 60 pound cans at 10 cents, 
light amber in 60 pound cans at Syi cents, 
amber in barrels 7 to 7^ cents, beeswax fair 
demand at $33.00 per hundred. 

Above are selling prices, not what we are 
paying. 

Jan. 20. C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 



CHICAGO. — There is more activity in the 
honey trade than was experienced during the 
latter part of December, and sales are about 
normal in quantity in both comb and extracted 
honey. For fancy grades of comb we still con- 
tinue to get 17 to 18c per lb., and the supply 
is not heavy. For grades running below this 
there is a variation in price from Ic to 5c per 
lb. Extracted white grades rim from 7c to Oc 
per lb., according to flavor and quality of 
honey. Ambers range from 7c to Sc per lb. 
Beeswax is steady at from 30 to 32c per lb. 

Tan. 20. R. A. BURNETT & CO., 

173 W. South Water Street. 



KANSAS CITY, MO.— The supply of both 
comb and extracted honey is not large, and the 
demand is not heavy. We quote: No. 1 white 
comb, 24 sec. cases at $3.25; No. 2 white 
comb, 24 sec. cases at $3.00; No. 1 amber 
comb, 24 sec. cases at $3.00; No. 2 amber, 24 
sec. cases at $2.75; extracted white, per lb., 
8^ to 9c; extracted amber, per lb., 8 to SJ-aC; 
extracteddark, per 11)., SJ^c; beeswax, dark, per 
lb., 25 to 28c. 

Jan. 22. C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 

NEW YORK. — Comb honey is well cleaned 
up, and prices are well sustained for what 
little odd lots are coming in. As to extracted, 
the market is weakening, and prices gradually 
declining. Strictly fancy clover, California 
white and water white sage hold their own 
fairly well, on account of not much stock be- 
ing around. There are large supplies of all 
other grades, such as alfalfa, amber, light am- 
ber, and white, etc., and prices show a decided 
downward tendency. In fact in large quan- 
tities, quotation prices will have to be shaded 
in order to affect sale. We quote nominalh': 
Alfalfa, 6^2 to "Yzc per pound, according to 
quality; California white sage at from 8^c to 
9c per pound; water white at from 95^2 to 10c 
per pound; white clover at from 9c to 10c per 
I)ound; buckwheat at from 6^ to 7c per pound. 
Beeswax steady at from 30c to 31c per pound. 

Jan. 20. HILDRETH & SOZELKEN. 



76 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



CINCINNATI. — The condition of the honey 
market reminds one of a ship that is beached, 
and must await the high tide to move it. It is 
useless to try to offer any indvicements to make 
sales, and to cut prices, owing to the small 
profit, would not only be a loss but would rum 
the conditions. Nevertheless, we do not over- 
look opportunities to make sales. For the 
fancy grades of table honey we are gettmg 
from 10c to lie a pound in 60-lb. cans, and 
for amber honey of the better grades from 
Sc to 9c. while for the low grades from 6c to 
Tc, according to the quality and quantity put- 
chased. These are our selling prices: Comb 
honey is moving somewhat slower than for 
some time back, and we are now getting from 
$.3.75 to $4.00 a case. For choice, bright yel- 
low beeswax, we are paying 30c a pound in 
cash, delivered here. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO. 

Tan. 19. , 51 Walnut street. 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 
I ^ 

FOR SALE 



For Sale.— Water white and light-amber 
alfalfa and light-amber fall honey, put up in 
any size packages. First class. 

Dadant & Sons, Hamilton, 111- 

For Sale. — Empty second-hand 60-lb. cans, 
as good as new, two cans to a case, at 25 cts. 
per case. C. H. W. Weber & Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 



Rhode Island Red Cockerels that are Red. 
Have spent three years line breeding. These 
are the first I have offered for sale. 

Dr. R. p. Wixom, 
273 Euclid Ave. East, Detroit, Mich. 

Golden Italian Oueens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found, tach ?1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 

For Sale. — One new bee hive, double walled. 
Hatch wax-press, and bee papers. F. 1- 
Hooper, E. Downin gton, Fa. 

For Sale or Exchange.— Gasoline engine, 
belting, shafting, etc. Buttercups, S. C. \\ • 
Leghorns for sale. Claud Irons, Linesville, 
Pa^ 

The Egner System of Bee-Keeping will in- 
crease both vour colonies and honey crop. 
Union bee-hive and queen. Price ten cents. 
Bee and poultry supplies for sale or exchange. 
Jos Egner, Lavergne, 111. 

For Sale. — Eastman kodak. Takes pictures 
314 by 5^. Good as new. H. L. Bowers, 
Rt. 1, Port Roya l, Pa. 

Buff Orpingtons — S. C. Cook's birds di- 
rect. Great winter layers. 15 eggs $2.00. R. 
B. Chip.man, Clifton Heights, Del. Co., Pa. 



Colonies of Italian Bees in L. hives, 10- 
fr., full of stores — any time. Jos. W'allrath, 
,\ntioch, Cal. 

Will Exchange a four-frame automatic ex- 
tractor for nuclei or cash, cheap. B. F. 
S.MiTH, Jr., Cowley, Wyo. 

White Wyandotte Cockerels, $2.50, $3.00 
and $3.50 each. From thoroughbred stock and 
heavy layers. A. Franklin Smith, 

Rt. 9, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

BuTTERCUPA and Houdans for large white 
eggs. Fine cockerels $3.00 and $5.00. 
RiVERViEW Poultry Farm, Union City, Mich. 

For Sale. — 6J/2 acres of best level land; new 
eight-room house; fine large spring and branch; 
5500 sq. feet of greenhouses; cannery; other 
out-buildings; right at city limits, population 
20,000; fine market; $4000 to $5000 yearly 
business; good for bees. Write for price and 
further particulars. 

M. D. Andes. Bristol, Tenn. 



Golden Queens. — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, five 
and six band, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also 
nuclei and full colonies. Send for circular and 
price list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

LiLLiE Farmstead Poultry. — B. P. Rocks, 
R. I. Reds, and S. C. W. Leghorn eggs for 
sale. 15 for $1; 26 for $1.50; 50 for $2.50. 
Colon C. Lillie, Coopersvillt, Mich. 

Silver, Golden and White Wyandotts. — 
Choice breeding stock at reasonable prices. 
Catalogue free. Browning's Wyandott Farm, 
Rt. 33, Portland, Mich. 

For Sale. — Amber and buckwheat honey in 
new 60-lb. tin cans. C. J. Baldriuge, Home- 
stead Farm, Kendaia. N. Y. 

Ringlet Barred Plymouth Rocks. — Fine, 
healthy, well barred cockerels and pullets at 
$2.00 each. Prize winners at our County Fair. 
R. J. Schloneger, Pigeon, Mich. 

For Sale. — Clover, basswood, alfalfa, sage or 
light amber fall honey. First-class stock put 
up in any sized cans. Send for price list. M. 
V. Facey, Preston, F'illmore Co., jMinn. 

For Sale.— New crop of alfalfa seed; 4 
pounds by mail, prepaid, $1.10; 50 to 100 lbs., 
141/^ cts. per lb. Sacks, 25 cts. extra. 

R. L. Snodgrass, Rt. 4, Augusta, Kansas. 

In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton, Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 

Complete Co.mb-IIoney Outfit for 1,000 
colonies, consisting of 460 colonies of bees in 
good condition; hives with worker combs, su- 
pers filled with sections, etc. Correspondence 
solicited from parties meaning business. Ad- 
dress Frank Rauchfuss, 1440 Market St.. 
Denver, Colo. 

For Sale. — 175 colonies of bees in 8-frame 
hives, run for comb honey, with 500 comb- 
honey supers, and about 35 full-depth hive- 
bodies filled with honey for next season's feed- 
ing. I am close to the Nevada State-line. No 
foul brood in this valley. H. Christensen, 
Coleville, Mono Co., Cal. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



77 



For Sale. — 560 acres of land in Arkansas, in 
the rice belt. Half cash; balance, city property. 
T. J. Greenfield, Hickory Ridge, Ark. 

For Sale. — Clover honey ripened on the 
hive, in 60-lb. cans; gathered in June, ex- 
tracted in August. Sample free. 

J. F. Moore, Tiffin, Ohio. 

For Sale. — Choice light-amber extracted 
honey — thick, well ripened, delicious flavor. 
Price 9 cts. per lb. in new 60-lb. cans. 

J. P. Moore, Morgan, Ky. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Fenn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 



For Sale — A. I. Root Supplies. Every- 
thing needed in the apiary. bend for cata- 
logue. Prices right. Sawyer & Hedden, Irv- 
ington. New Jersey. 

For Sale. — Finest quality white clover and 
basswood blend extracted honey, in new 60-lb. 
cans, $6.25 for single can, $12.00 per case of 
two cans. F. O. B. Flint. Cash with order. 
Leonard S. Griggs, 
711 Avon St., Flint, Mich. 

For Sale. — Clover, clover-basswood blend. 
niMk-week, and raspberry extracted honey in 
packages to suit. A. G. Woodman Co., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

"Eggmakers" — S. C. Brown Leghorns. State 
wide reputation. Cockerels $2.00, $3.00 and 
$5.00 each by return express. Wm. J. Cooper, 
Mt. Pleasant, Rt. 8, Mich. 

Fruit Lands, general store in English col- 
ony; apiary locations for sale, rent, or trade; 
bees, queens, honey, wax hives, and other sup- 
plies; fine opportunity for tropical bee-man with 
small capital; climate and lands finest in the 
world. Gather honey the year round. No land 
agent. I own all I offer. D. W. Millar. 

Bartle, Oriente, Cuba. 

February 20th and later I offer 400 
thrqe-frame neuclei with tested Italian qiujen 
for $3.50 each. Untested Italian queen 
for 75c each. Satisfaction guaranteed. My 
strain of Italian hees are developed honey- 
gatherers, result of 19 years record-keeping and 
selecting. No bee-disease has ever been near 
my bees. W. D. Achord, Fitzpatrick, Bul- 
lock Co., Alabama. 

WANTED 

Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted. — To buy amber and dark extracted 
honey; to sell, second-hand 60-lb. cans. 
A. G. Woodman Co., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. Hildreth & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

Wanted. — To buy 100 colonies of bees for 
spring delivery. Address E. B. Weirick, 
Prescott, Mich. 

Will pay 20 cents for February, 1004, num- 
ber of the Bee-Keepers' Review. O. .\. Keen, 
Topeka, Kans. 



Wanted. — Help for the active bee season of 
1912 — one or two young men who want to 
learn bee-keeping; board promised, and a little 
more if we do well. Wanted, also, a carload 
of bees, spring delivery. 

R. F. Holtermann, 
Brantford, Ont., Canada. 

Wanted. — Assistant apiarist. Must be steady, 
honest, and willing to go to Colorado or Mon- 
tana as needed. The Rocky Mountain Bee 
Co.. Berthoud, Colo. 

Wanted. — You to write me before ordering 
your hives. I have the use of a complete 
wood-working shop during the winter. Price, 
8 frame Langstroth hive $1.00, 10 frame $1.10. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Sample hive nailed 
and shipped at above price. 

Frank Rasmussen, Greenville, Mich. 

Paint WithoutOii 

Remarkable Discovery That Cuts 
Down the Cost of Paint Seventy- 
Five Per Cent. 

A Free Trial PaekaKe i.s Mailed to 
Everyone •»vln» Writes, 

A. L. Rice, a prominent maniifacturer 
of Adams, N. Y., has discovered a pro- 
cess of making a new kind of paint 
witiiout the use of oil. He calls it 
Powderpaint. It comes in the form of 
a dry powder and all that is required 
is cold water to make a paint weather- 
proof, fire proof and as durable as oil 
paint. It adheres to any surface wood, 
stone or brick, spreads and looks like 
oil paint and costs about one-fourth 
as much. 

Write to Mr. A. L. Rice, Manuf'r., 303 
North Sjt., Adams, N. Y., and he will 
send you a free trial package, also 
color card and full information show- 
ing you how you can save a good many 
dollars. Write today. 

CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 

in 

Honey, Beeswax, Maple Sugar and 

Syrnp, Ete. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 

GRAPE VINES 

Best varieties for vineyard and garden. Mil- Send lor 
lions of vines for sale. Our free book giv s F R F F 
instruction for planting, cultivating and prun- nnnv 
ing. Profusely illustrated. Issued by the "W"**- 
largest growers of grape vines and small fruits in the 
country. X. S. HUBBARD CO., Box 48, Fredonia, N Y 




At Last — A Comfortable Motorcycle 

The Ful-Floteing seat on the new 
Harleyliavidson Motori-ycle eliminates 
jolts, jars and all vibrations. The Free- 
wheel Control, another e.vclusive fea- 
ture makes it possible to start the 
Harley-Davidson like an automobile, 
without pedalinj; or runninj; alongside 
to start motor. Write tor catalog:. 
Harley-Davidson Motor Co., 344 A St., Milwankee 



78 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 





Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

Bright, Powerful, Economical. 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in your home. If your 
dealer hasn't got them, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
many as you want at 25c each. 
AGENT.S WANTED EVERY- 

^thFsteel mantle light CO. 

S33 Huron St., Toledo, O. 



Established ISSo 
WE CARRY AN UP-TO-DATE LINE OF 

Bee-keepers' Supplies 

Write for our 50-page catalog 
free, and for lowest prices on 
supplies. Full information 

given to all inquiries. We 
handle the best make of goods 
for the bee-keeper. 

Freight facilities good. Let 
us hear from you. 
John Xel)el & Son Supply Co., High Hill, 3Io. 



MEXICO AS 
A BEE COUNTRY 

B. A. Hadsell, one of the largest bee-keepers 
in the world, has made six trips to Mexico, 
investigating that country as a bee country, 
and is so infatuated with it that he is closing 
out his bees in Arizona. He has been to great 
expense in getting up a finely illustrated 32- 
page booklet describing the tropics of Mexico 
as a Bee Man's Paradise, which is also su- 
perior as a farming, stock raising and fruit 
country, where mercury ranges between 55 
and 98. Frost and sun-stroke is unknown. 
Also a great health resort. He will mail this 
book free by addressing 

B. A. HADSELL, Lititz, Pa. 



WANTED 
WHITE HONEY 



Both 



comb and extracted. Write 
us before disposing of 
your crop. 



HILDRETH & SEGELKEN 

265-267 Greenwich St. 

New York, N. Y. 

American Butter & Cheese 
Co., 

31-33 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 

Always in the market for choice 
comb honey. Write us. 



Queen - Bee Cuts 
For Sale 



I have had several calls 
for cuts of queens. So 
far I have been unable to 
supply them, but from now 
on I oan furnish you, 
postpaid, a cut like the 
one shown in this adver- 
tisement for fifty cents. 
Can send you as many as 
you want at this price. 




■Address" 



The Bee - Keepers' Review 

23|0 Woodland Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufaduring Sedtions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 
CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 

AQUASUN 

One gallon of dark honey makes 200 to 300 
gallons of Aquasun, which is finer in flavor 
and more nutritious than any apple or grape 
juice. Made quickly, by agitation, same as 
buttermilk. 

ANTABUM 

One gallon of dark honey makes 20 to 40 
gallons of Antabuni, which, fed to bees, as a 
spring tonic, enables them to digest and store 
3 to 5 times as much honey as when not so 
assisted. Either process, by mail, $1. 

C. W. DAYTON, Chatsworth. Calif. 



SWEET CLOVER 

Seed, for winter sowing on top ground. 

Circular how to grow it free. 

nukharn Seeil Co., Box 2Jt«-C, 

Kal mouth, Ky. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



79 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young basswood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 


ResultsCount 


When you buy COMB FOUNDATION 
you look for RESULTS. 

THE DIITMER PROCESS CO.MB 
FOUNDATION is the right SMELL, 
the right TASTE and the right FIRM- 
NESS to give the BEST RESULTS. 

The DITTMER PROCESS COMB 
FOUNDATION is so like the Bees- 
wax the Honey Bees would SHAPE and 
MOULD for themselves, it makes it 
very acceptable to them. This assures 
a FULL CAPACITY HONEY CROP, 
and remember, to you, Mr. Bee Keeper, 
HONEY IS MONEY. 


A Liberal Discount Offered on All Sup- 
plies. Write for Prices. 


MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 


Gus. Dittmer Co. 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 




THE SECRET OF 

Success in Bee Keeping 

Is To Keep Your Colony Strong; To Do This You Must Have 

Good Laying Queens 

Which we Guarantee at the forowing Prices: 

[Golden] [3 Band Italian] [Carniolan] 
Untested— 1 for sfl.OO, G for $5.40. 12 for .$9.00, 25 for $17.50. 
Tested—] for $1.50, 6 for $8.40. 12 for $15.60, 25 for $30.00. 
Nuclei with Untested Queen— 1 Frame $2.50, 2 Frame $3.50, Si.x 1 Frame 

$15.(;.0, Six 2 Frame $20.40. 
Nuclei with Tested Queen — 1 Frame $3.00, 2 Frame $4.00. Six 1 Frame 

$17.40, Six 2 Frame $23.40. 

The Drones used in our Apiary for Mating purpose are reared from 
the very best selected Queens, which is as necessary as the selecting of a 
good Queen for Queen rearing. 

J'or good Queens and quick .service \()U can not do better than place your 
order with us. We guarantee safe arrival and satisfaction. Directions for 
Ijuilding up weak Colonies will he mailed to you for 10 cents. 

The above Queens are all reared in separate yards. 

W. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

R. F. D. No. 3 Little Rock, Ark. 



80 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



A New Year's Resolution 
for the Year 1912 

I will keep more bees. 

I will devote more time to my bees. 

I will give more thought to my bees. 

I will co-operate with the local and national organizations. 

I will use Lewis Beeware. 

THE NEW 1912 LEWIS BEEWARE CATALOG IS NOW READY FOR 
YOU. THE BEST WE HAVE EVER ISSUED. 

ENTIRELY REWRITTEN WITH NEW ILLUSTRATIONS. 
MORE COMPLETE AND COMPREHENSIVE THAN EVER. 

If you are not on our regular mailing list, send for one at once — 
it is free for the asking. 

30 DISTRIBUTING HOUSES SELL LEWIS 
BEEWARE THROUGH THIS CATALOG. 

Ask for the name of the nearest one. 
LEWIS BEEWARE IS SUCCESS INSURANCE. 

G. B. LEWIS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Beeware WATERTOWN, WIS. 



Camiolan Alpine Queens — Gray Workers 

SELECT TESTED QUEENS, March, April, May, $5.00; 

June, July, August, $3.50. 
SELECT UNTESTED, June, July, August, $2.00. 

Shipped to all parts of the world, postage free. Safe arrival guaranteed. Inter- 
national money order with every order. Dead queens replaced if returned in 24 hours 
after arrival. References respective financial and commercial responsibility of the under- 
signed Association can be had at every Imperial-Royal Austro-Hungarian Consulate in 
the U. S. and Canada. Write for our booklet. Orders for nuclei and hives cannot be 
filled until everything concerning this line of business is arranged properly. 

Remit money order and write English to the 

Imperial -Royal Agricultural Association 

Ljubljana, Carniola (Krain) 
AUSTRIA 



Chaff Hives Smokers Beginners' Outfits 

Danz. Hives ^Veils Shipping Cases 

Dovetailed Hives Bee Books Swarm Catchers 

Sections Honey Extractors Berry Baskets 

Comb Foundation Wax Presses ^Berry Crates, Iitc. 

Which are you interested in? Send your name for our 1912 

Catalog. February discount, 3% for cash orders. 

M. H. HUNT & SON Lansing, Mich. 



BARGAIN SALE 

-IN- 

BEE SUPPLIES 

DON'T MISS IT 

Take advantage of the Closing Out 
Sale of the Page & Lyon Go's 
Stock of 

OLD RELIABLE 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Send for ij Catalog and write me just how 
much and what you want, and I will 
quote you NET PRICES. 

J. F. KENKEL, Trustee 

for Page & Lyon Mfg. Co. 
NEW LONDON, WISCONSIN 



Figure This Out For 

"^T ir If You buy Bee - Supplies 

I OUrSClr! NOW that you will need 
— ^^^^■^^^^■^"" in April you Save Money 
at the rate of 12 per cent on the ^. 

Three per cent is the amount of our early order discount on 
cash purchases in January. January to April is just three months 
— ]/4 of a year. Now, 3% for 3 months is interest at the rate of 
12% per year — so you see why we urge early orders accompanied 
by cash this month. 

Another reason is that we can serve you better now than 
three months hence. In a few weeks we will be putting up car- 
load shipments for our dealers and distributing centers and every 
effort in our big plant — the largest establishment in the world 
devoted to the manufacture of bee-supplies — will be directed to 
filling rush orders. You will be just as anxious for your goods as 
our other patrons, and will deserve and receive the same attention 
— no matter what the amount of your order may be, but 

WE CAN SERVE YOU BETTER NOW. 

and we want to make it worth your while to place an early order. 
Try this on a part of your list anyway. Saving at the rate of 12% 
per year ought to interest everybody. 

WE MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING IN 
BEE-SUPPLIES. 

Get our 1912 catalog which gives descriptions, illustrations 
and prices on everything from bee-hives to bee-books, from frames 
to comb-foundation. Get this catalog now. 



The A. I. Root Company 

MEDINA, OHIO 



THE CHAS. F, MAY CO.. PRINTERS, D ETROIT, M ICH . 







Published MonthJi^ 




MAR. 
1912 

'^ 'W 'W 

DETROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 



Friction 
Transmission 




Self 
Starter 



Five Good Models 



There is a Cartercar for every 
need of the practical man and 
his family — four, five and seven- 
passenger Touring Cars, Coupe 
and Roadster. 

In these models are all the 
latest improvements in the au- 
tomobile world, and also the 
Cartercar features which have 
given satisfaction to thousands 
of drivers. 

For business needs, the Car- 
tercar is speedy, always ready 
and always reliable — and for 
pleasure it is luxurious, easy to 
drive, and with plenty of power 
to travel any roadway without 
jolting or tiring the occupants 
of the car. 

The patented Friction Trans- 
mission of the Cartercar pre- 
vents waste of power and is so 
simple and reliable that it is 
recognized as the most efficient 
form of transmission. It gives 



an unlimited number of speeds, 
adapting the car especially to 
country use. 

The Chain-in-oil Drive is ab- 
solutely noiseless, and running 
in a continual oil bath, there is 
practically no wear on the chain. 

Self Starter, Full Floating 
Rear Axle, Three Brakes, and 
many other features just as 
good, combine to make the Car- 
tercar the ideal car for every- 
one to drive. The self-starter 
makes it very easy for ladies to 
operate. 

The man who drives a Carter- 
car has more time for business 
— both he and his family get 
more enjoyment out of life — 
and he finds that his car is one 
of the best investments he ever 
made. 

Let us send you complete in- 
formation. 



Cartercar Company 



PONTIAC, MICHIGAN. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 



81 



The Fruit Belt of Michigan 

Offers Wonderful Opportunities to Bee Men, Orchard- 
men and Farmers. 

Land values are at present very low — $15 per acre upwards — people are 
just waking: up to the possibilities in this favored section. Some have already 
begun to casli in and others are coming along in a remarkable way. Land 
\-alucs will increase rapidly as the basic values are here — Soil, Climate, Prox- 
imity to Markets. 

Let us tell you what we can do for you. Write us frankly today as to 
yoiu' ideas. a\ailable means, etc. 

Mr. Tyrrell will vouch for us. 

FRUIT BELT LAND CORPORATION, 

52 Greenbush St., Manistee, Mich. 



Oats, AlfalfaisiPotatoes 




SALZEE'S REJUVENATED WHITE BONANZA OATS. 

Twenty acres of your laDd sowa to this faiiious Oms sliuuM lie good for 2000 bushels 

ia 1912. These 2000 bushels for reeding purjioses are worth lo-day $1000.001 Why 

mak this^lODO.OOf.r 19ir.' The White Bonanza Oats won, years aso, the Am. 

Act. prize of $500.00 in gold for the heaviest vieldius; Oats opened to the wo.-ld, and in 

1910 and 1911 the sworn-to yields range from' 80 to 259 bushels per acre I 

SALZEE'S HARDY ALFALFA. 

Is the bigeest, quickest ontinuous money-maker lor the farmer known. 

Kx-Gov. Hoard of Wisconsin says, re<;ardiu!^ Salzer's Alfalfa: •■ On 30 

•er $-'500.00 worth of Alfalf-. hay. • 

POTATOES. 

Potatoes are our great specialty. The Editor of the Rural New Yorker 

■-•ives to "Salzer's Earliest" the astonishin:; yield of 464 bushels to the a 

Salzers Catalos gives fulldescription of heavv vieldiug "full birioded' 

|..diL'ree Slocks in Oits, Barlev, Spriu^ Wheat", Spring Kve, Corn, 

Clovers, Timothv, Potatoes, etc., etc. 

FOR 10c IN STAMPS WE WILL MAIL 
vou a larie package of S.dzer's Kaiuous WliM.- Bonanza O.its, o 
H.irdy Alfalfa, together with man v other rare F.irai Seed samples 
also big Farm Seed Catalog free for the uskiu'--. 



in 






JOHN A. SALZER SEED CO. 
3 S. Sth Street, La Crosse. Wis. 




Carniolan Alpine Queens — Gray Workers 

SELECT TESTED QUEENS, March, April, May, $5.00; 

June, July, August, $3.50. 
SELECT UNTESTED, June, July, August, $2.00. 

Shipped to all parts of the world, postage free. Safe arrival guaranteed. Inter- 
national money order with every order. Dead queens replaced if returned in 24 hours 
after arrival. _ References respective financial and commercial responsibility of the under- 
signed Association can be had at every Imperial-Royal Austro-Hungarian Consulate in 
the U. S. and Canada. Write for our booklet. Orders for nuclei and hives cannot be 
tilled until everything concerning this line of business is arranged properly. 

Remit money order and write English to the 

Imperial -Royal Agricultural Association 

Ljubljana, Carniola (Krain) 
AUSTRIA 



82 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



IF BEES COULD TALK 

They Would Say : 

"GIVE US 

*Dadant's Foundation' 



IT'S CLEAN, ITS PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES ' 



If you are not using " DADANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DADANT & SON S, {'lT,',^^'?^: 
A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 

arjTJ 



BINGHAM 

Original 
Direct Draft 

CLEAN 

Bee Smokers 




BINGHAM SMOKERS 

Insist on Olil Reliable Bingham Bee Smokers; for sale by all 
dealers in bee-keepers' supplies. For over 30 years the standard 
in all countries. The smoker with a valve in the bellows, 
direct draft, bent cap, inverted bellows and soot-burning device. 

Smoke Engine. 4-inch each $1.2.5; mail, $1.50 

Doctor, 3V2-inch each .8.5; mail, 1.10 

Conquerer, 3-inch each .75; mail, 1.00 

Little Wonder, 2-inch each .50; mail, .65 

Honey Knife each .70; mail, .80 

llaniifsu'tiirtMl i«iil.> •>,> 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

(;r:in<l Kaiiiil.s, 3Ii«-li. 



Protection Hive 

The best and lowest price hive on the market. This 
hive has ]/% material in the outer wall, and is not 
cheaply made of Y^ material like some other hives on 
the market. Send for circular showing 12 large illus- 
trations. It will pay you to investigate. 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

CK.WI) RAITDS, :\ir('ii. 




THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



83 




"If gon'l<; are wanted quick, send to Ponder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Sinndard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
b ker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
My equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 
excelled. 

PAPER HONEY JARS 

For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
parnffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
frei-. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
tim< « I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis.lnd. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 



Power 



SAWS 



in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 

384 Ruby Street, Rockford, Illinois. 



WHAT YOU GET AT 

C I N C I N N AT I 



Some things in addition to service, prompt and satisfactory shipments, 
and a real desire to please you, that come from the central point of dis- 
tribution. 

Root's Supplies — new and clean, and of the finest quality. New hives, new foundation 
- — everything fresh from the factory in carload shipments. 

Early-order Discounts for Cash: Three per cent for January; two per cent for Feb- 
ruary — a worth-while saving to which you are entitled. Don't fail to get your 
order in at once. 

Saving on Freight or Express. By buying here, part of the cost of transportation is 
borne by us. You pay only from Cincinnati. This is quite an item on large 
orders, and our patrons are coming to appreciate it inore and more. 

Just bear these facts in mind, and begin the new year right by ordering 
your season's supplies from 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO., 

2146 CENTRAL AVENUE, CINCINNATI, OHIO 



84 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



National Bee -Keepers' 
Association 



OBJECTS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



The objects of this Association shall be to 
aid its members in the business of bee-keeping; 
to help in the sale of their honey and beeswax, 
and to promote the interests of bee-keepers in 
any other direction decided upon by the Board 
of Directors. 



OFFICERS AND EXFXUTI\-E BOARD. 

President — Gen. W. York, Chicago, 111. 
\'ice-Pres. — Morley Pettit, Guelph, Ont. 
Secretary — E. B. Tyrrell, Detroit, Mich. 
Treas.-Gen'l Mgr.— N. E. France, Plattsville, 
Wis. 

DIRECTORS. 

E. D. Townsend, Remus, Mich, 
Wesley Foster, Boulder. Colo. 

F. Wilcox, Mauston, Wis. 

J. E. Crane, JNIiddlebury. Vt. 

J. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn, 



Annual Membership $1.50, one-third, or 50 
cents of which goes to the local branch where 
such branch is organized. Send dues to the 
Secretary. 



SECTIONS 

fl We make a specialty of 
manufaduring Sedions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 
CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 



Paint Without Oil 

Remarkable Discovery That Cuts 
Down the Cost of Paint Seventy- 
Five Per Cent. 

A Free Trial Package >** Mailed to 
Everyone whn Writes. 

A. L. Rice, a prominent manufacturer 
of Adams, N. Y., has discovered a pro- 
cess of making a new kind of paint 
without the use of oil. He calls it 
Powderpaint. It comes in the form of 
a dry powder and all that is required 
is cold water to make a paint weather 
proof, fire proof and as durable as oil 
paint. It adheres to any surface wood, 
stone or brick, spreads* and looks like 
oil paint and costs about one-fourth 
as much. 

Write to Mr. A. L. Puce, Manuf'r., .303 
North St., Adams, N. Y.. and he will 
send you a free trial package, also 
color card and full information show- 
ing" you how you can save a good many 
dollars. Write today. 



W. H. Laws 

will be ready to take care of your (|ueen 
orders, whether large or small, the coming 
season. Twenty-five years of careful breed- 
ing brings Laws' queens above the usual 
standard; better let us book your orders 
now. 

Tested queens in March; untested, after 
April 1st. .\bout 50 first-class breeding- 
queens ready at any date. 

Prices: Tested, $1.2.5; .5 for $.3.00; lireed- 
ers, each $.5.00. Address 

W. H. I.atvs, Beeville, Texas. 



PORTER BEE ESCAPE 

SAVES 
TIME HONEY MONEY 

l."e eaoli, .$l.<S,-» rtoz. All Dealers. 

^lamit'aetui'ecl only by 

R. tt E. r. PORTER, Levi-iston, 111. 



-Chaff Hives 
-Danz. Hives 
-Dovetai'ed Hives 
-Sections 
-Comb Foundation 



-Smokers 
-Veils 
-Bee Books 
-Hone}' Extractors 
-Wax Presses 



-Beginners' Outfits 
-Shipping Cases 
-Swarm Catchers 
-Berry Baskets 
-iBerry Crates, Etc. 



Which are you interested in? Send your name for our 1912 
Catalog. February discotmt, 3% for cash orders. 



M. H. HUNT & SON 



Lansing, Mich. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



85 



Why Not REAR Your Own QUEENS? 



Doolittle's "Scientific Queen-Rearing" and the 
American Bee Journal for 1912 — Both for Only 



$1.00 



D 



Every Bee-keeper Should Have Both Book and 
Bee-Paper. 

OOLITTLE'S "Scientific Queen-Rearing" book 
contains 126 pages, and is bound in leatherette 
with round corners. It tells in the clearest 
way possible jvst how the famous queen-breeder, 
Mr! G. M. Doolittle, rears the best of queen-bees 
in perfect accord with Nature's way. It is for 
both amateur and veteran in bee-keeping. As all 
know. Mr. Doolittle has spent some 40 years in 
rearing queens and producing honey. He has no 
superior as a queen-breeder. You can learn to rear 
fine queens by following his directions. Read up 
now befnre the bee season is here. 

You will not regret having this book, which also 
gives his management of the bees for the produc- 
tion of honey. 

The book, and the American Bee Journal for 
1912, for only $1.00, is certainly a big bargrain for 
you. Send the $1.00 now, and we will begin your 
subscription w-ith January 1. 1912, and mail you 
this book. Sample copy of the Bee Journal free. 
.\ddress 

GEORGE W. YORK & CO., 117 No. Jefferson St 





Chicago, III. 



Heciltk \ 



o 




G erm^ Jh ike h/oHd< 






Jim^ aTzd 










Honey and water only is required. Xo additional acid, flavoring or coloring 
matter of any kind whatsoever. Aquasun is made of any sharpness that is de- 
sired. It pleases ever}- palate and invigorates every system and the refreshing 
effect lingers two to four hours afterward. Aquasun contains no alcohol or 
other intoxicant. It is just crisp, crackling, lively fruit acid intermingled with a 
taste of sweetness that produces a flavor that is perfectly delightful. 

Aquasun cools us in summer and warms us in winter b}- instantly dispersing 
acid (o.xygen) and oil (carbon) to the parts vrhere these elements have become 
lacking. The elements of Aquasun are strong in solor iron which enriches the 
blood and changes water to hydrogen, the all powerful disease fighter of this 
planet. Asquasun is not a mold or a ferment ; neither brewed nor doctored. Its 
elements are selected and proportioned according to nature's law by the plants 
which yield honey. 

C. W. DAYTON, 
Chatsworth, California. 



86 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




M\}^ '^U-'^UlfitX5* 3^^tottt 



A MONTHLY JOURNAL 



DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF HONEY PRODUCERS 

^l.nn A fpar 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editorand Publisher 
Office OF Pu BLiCATiON - - - 230 Woodlan d Aven ue 

VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, MARCH 1, 1912, No. 3. 

Improving Your Bees While Producing Honey. 

GEO. B. HOWE, 

'^^^ HERE is no part in bee-keeping that has been so sadly neg- 
^j lected and at the same time is so important as breeding. I 
honestly believe that bees can be improved as well as any 
other stock if we thoroughly understand zvhat zee are doing. The 
nature of bees makes it very hard to breed them in a fair and 
intelligent way. 

The results I have secured makes it hard to prove that bees 
can not be improved. It is no theory with me. I have been led by 
results. \\'e must be led by facts alone or we will surely fail. It 
was not what I said about my bees, that brought me into the light 
of the bee-keeping world, but the honey I got from theiii. I am cer- 
tain that I have been fair, and in all my tests with other strains 
and races that it has been my good fortune to test, it was honey 
and honey alone that counted. I was not led by color or any other 
fad. I merely let the bees do their own selecting as to color. So 
you who may say I was partial to the dark strain of Italians will 
understand that had my yellow bees given me the best results my 
stock would be the yellow and not the dark leather, as it is called. 

WHAT IS SCRUB STOCK? 

I am not the only one who has good and well-bred bees, and 
if you have such you will see just why you should not add new 
blood to your strain unless it is absolutel}^ necessary. Some make 
the extravagant claim that their scrub stock makes more honey than 
the best bred bees. How do they know they have scrub bees? 
Their color may be ofif, but their vigor to get honey is there just 



88 THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 

the same. I hardly think that would stand the test as scrub stock, 
as some of the most beautiful bees I ever saw were the most worth- 
less for honey gathering. 

HOW I STABTEI) BKEEDING. 

What led me to breeding bees was this: Twenty-six years ago 
I bought two colonies of black, or German, bees in old box hives. 
I found that while one gathered double the honey the other one did, 
they seemed the same in strength, also were nearly the same in 
color. 

The colony that made the most honey would swarm but once 
in a season, sometimes not at all, but the other colony would swarm 
two or three times. I thought the others should swarm, and could 
not understand why they did not. You can see that what should 
have been my breeding queen was not bred from, but the poor 
strain was doubling and trebling. Here is where you are deceived 
in believing that 3'our bees were run out by inbreeding when really 
they were run out by breeding from undesirable stock. 

WHY S^HB SHOV/ SUCH A VA3IATXON. 

You should all know that the queen is never fcriiUrjcd but once, 
but does sometimes mate more than once. The drone docs not in,atc 
with more than one queen, and as there is a great variation in all 
males as well as females even in bee life, I am led to believe there is 
the same variation in drones as there is in the queens. 1 can prove 
it with queens, but it is theory with drones, is it not? 

Now as our queens mate we use the drone onh' once while 
with all animals like swine, sheep, etc., we can use the same male 
time and again. 

YOU CAIff'T IKBREE3 BEES. 

Please tell me how you can inbreed bees? I w^ould like to know 
if there is a way to do it. Each drone and queen make one family, 
and even if you use the same strain of bees the more colonies you 
have, the more families you have, and the better chance to improve 
your bees, as we select the best, not only for queen mothers but 
drone fathers as well. 

PAUTHBIIOGES^ESIS. 

Is it any wonder that there is such a wide diversity of opinions 
in regard to it? Now any one can easily prove the truth of 
parthenogenesis in bees. 

Take any pure race of bees. Italians zvill )iot do as iltey are 
hybrids to start zvith. Now take say a black queen or Carniolan, 
(black preferred), as they are the purest race I have found to ex- 
periment with. Mate these black queens to yellozv Italian drones 
or any other yellow race. Put on a drone guard to keep the drones 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



89 




Here the Howe Queens are Reared, in Deerficld, Massachusetts. 



out. Now find a drone that shows any 3'ellow blood if you can. I 
find that it is true every time. 

THE ITAZIAIT A E-STBiSID. 

I said that the Italian bee was a hybrid. Let me explain. I 
never saw a queen of what we call pure Italian blood but what 
won id show a variation in her drones and queens. It makes no dif- 
ference if her worker progeny are perfectly marked, her queens will 
\ ary in color ever}- time. 

Nor is this all. I have taken tlie average Italian strains, not 
i^olden but the banded stock, and by selecting the dark queens of 
the right color, in three generations have bred the Black bee with 
all their characteristics. I could not say what these queens mated* 
v/ith ; might have been Black drones, as there w^ere Black bees in 
mating distance. 

aim: HITB^ISS BETTEI!^? 

I was told that the Hybrid bee was better than a pure race. 
I bred these crosses for a few years and got some wonderful colonies, 
but by keeping a record I found that I got too much variation as 
to honey, some giving large yields while others scarcely a living. I 
used a pure Italian queen, that is, a three banded stock, mating these 
queens to Black drones. I found I could take a Hybrid queen and 
by selecting the yellow queens, her daughters, get some of them 
that would breed pure Italian workers. About one-third of these 



•90 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

queens that seemingly mated to yellow drones would do this. I 
used this stock for seven generations, selecting the yellow queens 
and they bred pure every time. 

{Continued in April nuuiher.) 



Irrigation Opens Up New Fields — The Other Side 

of the Question. 

S. KING CLOVER. 

■ ^\i NOTICE an article in the January number of the Review, 
Jl page 2-5, "Irrigation Opens Up New Fields," and I wish to make 
some comments upon the same. I have been in the Yakima 
Valley since the spring of 1904, and all the while actively engaged 
in bee culture, and have had some experience so far as "locality" is 
concerned. ^,. :,,• 

BEE JOURITAI.S GUILTY. "''^ 

The Department of the Interior, the bee journals, newspapers, 
real estate agents, and the railroads are very active in advertising 
the irrigated districts of the west as profitable localities for bee- 
keeping. A great wrong I fear is being done, first, to the bee- 
keeper that is already located, and second, to the bee-keeper that 
may be induced to sell out in the east and come to a place which 
may not suit him nor his family. We read of some irrigation pro- 
ject that is about to be opened up, and become of the opinion that, 
as if by magic, it will be turned into one vast alfalfa field affording 
unlimited forage for hundreds of colonies of bees. This is far from 
true. A great amount of the country west of the rockies has been 
in volcanic action, and is strewn many feet deep with volcanic ashes, 
which has become decomposed, and with the aid of irrigation will 
grow crops. The soil being light the wind blows it easily and in 
time it is in appearance to drift. Before the land can be seeded it 
must be "leveled," i.e., given a general slope in some direction. The 
leveling or grading of land preparatory to seeding is both laborious 
and sometimes quite expensive, and costs as much as one hundred 
dollars an acre, though twenty to fifty is a common price to pay an 
acre for grading. It may be readily seen that the land is not seeded 
with a rush. We have windy springs, beginning often in March 
and keeping up more or less all the time until July. 

HARD TO GET SEEDING. 

Unless there is plenty of water availal)le all the time the seed- 
ing may be blown out, necessitating re-seeding. Then there are the 
land speculators who buy up large quantities and hold it for an 
advance in price, expecting the improved land to increase the price 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 91 

of their holdings — and it usually does. The Sunnyside Project is. 
probably 20 years old, and from where I Sit I can see probably 
three or four thousand acres yet in sage brush, all under the ditch. 
Locally, bee-keepers spring up as fast as the territory opens up, and 
occupy the territory. 

"Many of the projects are located in famous fruit sections and a. 
combination is found to be of mutual advantage. The trees furnish 
an abundance of honey during the blossoming period, etc." To me 
that last remark requires quite a stretch of imagination, as compared 
with the truth. 

FRXnT BI.OOM NOT VI£I.DINa. 

During fruit bloom I have failed as yet to see a single trace of 
even raw nectar in the hives. There is scarcely enough nectar in 
the fruit bloom to entice the bees. 

Don't bite too readily at making "large returns'' from invest- 
ments in acreage tracts near the town sites. A sucker is born every 
minute. The bee-keepers are not averaging over from 40 to 60' 
pounds per colony in the Yakima Valley. Extracted honey sells at 
from seven cents to nine cents, and comb at about twelve cents. 

The hay is cut three to four times a season and hardly gets into 
bloom until it is cut again. This only affords a few days' harvest 
and compels one to engage almost exclusively in the production of 
extracted honey. 

It has been reported that there are about 13,000 to 15,000 col- 
onies located in the Yakima Valley. 

We are producing more honey, together with what is shipped 
into tli^e state from Utah, Idaho and California, than we can dispose 
of, and will be compelled to seek outside markets. Better the whole 
loaf in the eastern market than half a loaf in the west. 

Localities where they are growing alfalfa seed furnish more 
nectar than the localities where they grow hay simply for hay. 

Yakima Valley raises little or no alfalfa seed. I would call the 
bee-keeping fraternities' attention to the article written by R. D. 
Bradshaw, of Payette, Idaho, page 96, February 15 number of 
Gleanings, in regard to overstocking a territory. 

THINK BEFORE aOING WEST. 

Those of you who have your cosy homes where God waters the 
land with the rain, where you have good water to drink, plenty of 
fuel, your friends, think twice before you sacrifice j-our homes to 
go to a land and a condition you know little about, devoid of the 
improvements aft'orded by older, settlements, and old established 
society ; those of you who appreciate even a garden of vegetables, 
beware of these irrigated districts. 

The railroads have no other object in enticing you west than to 
convey you out here at so much per head, the same as other mer- 



92 THE BEE-KEF.PERS' REVIEW 

chandise. It is a money-making scheme like other schemes. They 
have no interest in you after you are once here, unless you wish to 
go back east. Irresponsible bee-keepers frequently give glowing 
reports to the press for publication, which are far from the truth. 
The real estate agents are on the alert for just such articles, and 
they are widely published. 

FBICi: I.ANI> IS SEIiIiING FOB. 

Raw land is selling at $100 per acre, ordinary improved hay 
land at $200. $250 and $300. A ten-acre piece is no ranch, twenty is 
an existence, and forty is necessary to make money upon. Taxes 
are over $1.00 per acre — about $1.25 to $1.50 per acre. Water main- 
tenance 95c per acre. Wood $G per cord. Coal $6.50 to $9 per ton. 
A ten-frame bee-hive (brood nest only) frames, follower, foundation 
nailed, painted, $2.00 each. 

Come west if you will, but bring your purse. 
Mabton, Wash. 

[Whenever anything appears in the Review which you believe 
will give a wrong impression, don't fail to send in your little pro- 
test, just as this subscriber has done. What I am trying to do is to 
give things just exactly as they are, and I always welcome a correc- 
tion. At the same time we must remember there are two sides to 
every story. You must weigh up the evidence on each side and 
come to vour own conclusion.] 



Advantages and Disadvantages of Sectional Hives. 

J. E. HAND. 

"••^ MON'G the subjects recommended for discussion, the ques- 
^/\ tion is asked, "What are the advantages of the sectional 
hive?" It would hardly be fair to set forth their advantages 
without mentioning any disadvantages, therefore, I will endeavor 
to lay aside all prejudice and set forth in a fair and impartial man- 
ner the advantages and disadvantages of sectional hives as viewed 
from the standpoint of one who has had them in constant use for 
more than twenty years. 

The original hive as introduced by Mr. Heddon contained closed 
end standing frames in a tight fitting case making the hive double 
walled at the ends, afYording better winter protection. The chief 
advantages claimed for sectional hives are : First — Their adaptability to 
the handling of hives instead of frames, an important consideration 
when economy of labor is considered. Second — It admits of the ex- 
pansion or contraction of the brood chamber to suit the require- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 93 

ments of the largest as well as the smallest colony without the use 
of dummies, or the handling of frames, and without giving too much 
room at one time. Third — ^It affords a horizontal bee space between 
€ach two divisions of the brood chamber, affording free communica- 
tion for the bees and queen to all parts of the brood nest through 
the warmest part of the hive, enabling them to have their brood in 
a compact form in early spring, thus economizing heat and guarding 
against the chilling of brood. Fourth — When it is desirable to spread 
the brood all that is necessary is to interchange the divisions of the 
brood chamber, placing the empty combs at the top in the warmest 
part of the hive, thus enabling the bees to extend the brood nest 
upward in the warmest part of the hive instead of downward into 
the coldest part. Fifth — If artificial increase is desired all that is 
necessary is to separate the two divisions, removing the one that 
contains the most brood to a new location and give a queen to the 
one that starts queen cells. This may be determined by glancing 
up between the combs from the bottom. Sixth — The queen may be 
restricted to one-half the brood chamber by means of a queen ex- 
cluder placed between the two divisions. Seventh — The brood 
frames and section frames as well as the extracting frames of a 
properly constructed sectional hive are of the same dimensions and 
may be used interchangeably, likewise the supers may be used as 
brood chambers and vice versa. 

TKi: BX3AI>VAI7TACi:S. 

The disadvantages of sectional hives as we see them are, first, 
there are times when it is imperative that frames should be handled. 
At such times these hives are placed at a disadvantage on account 
of their numerous frames, as well as by the inconvenience of 
handling closed end frames in a close fitting hive. The latter 
objection may be overcome by the use of hanging frames in regular 
standard deep supers, and we recommend these in preference to 
closed end standing frames. In actual practice we seldom inter- 
change the divisions of the brood chamber for purposes above men- 
tioned, and we are not sure that bees build up more rapidly in these 
hives. 

After a close observance during the past three seasons with a 
view of ascertaining the truth of the matter we have about come 
to the conclusion that a medium to light colony will show more 
brood early in the season in a full depth hive than in a sectional 
hive. In strong colonies the dift'erence is not so noticable. To 
overcome this objection we usually place light colonies on top of 
strong ones early in the spring, separating them by a queen ex- 
cluder, and we regard this as the best way to build up weak colonies 
in time for clover harvest. We are using sectional hives side by 



94 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

side with full depth hives, and we do not consider the advantages 
either way sufificient to warrant a change in hives. There are prin- 
ciples in the bee-keeping world today that are as far ahead of the 
sectional hive system as that is ahead of the old box hive of our 
ancestors. The watchword is to no longer handle hives instead of 
frames, but handle bees instead of hives and frames. 

SECTIONAIi KTVE BETTER FOR QUEEN REARING. 

AMiile under modern methods of handling bees, instead of hives 
and frames, one hive is practically as good as another, so far as 
honey production is concerned, when it comes to commercial queen 
rearing, the superiority of the sectional hive is manifest in every 
operation of the art. Owing to its numerous frames, as well as its 
system of horizontal contraction and expansion by hives, it is 
especially suited for queen rearing. An 8-frame division with a 
division board in the center, will accommodate two good strong 
nuclei, and is the most economical method known. These hives 
are also equally suited to the economical construction of queen cells. 
Taken all around, the sectional hive is unmistakably the queen 
breeder's hive. 

Birmingham, Ohio. 

[The conclusion that I come to after reading the above is, 
that Mr. Hand, after trying both kinds of hives, does not consider 
the advantag'e of either over the other of sufficient importance to 
warrant a change from one to the other being made. I would 
"guess,"' however, that if he were starting anew, he would adopt 
the regular Langstroth hive.] 



A Simple System of Swarm Control By Forced 

Swarming. 

GEO W. STEPHENS. 

•■Jl' HAVE been asked to write a description of ni}^ non-swarming, 
^ or, rather, swarm control system for The Review, and will 
now endeavor to do so. First, I will say I quit looking for 
a non-swarming strain or race of bees several years ago. I believe 
yet, however, that if I could run fast enough I could find them at 
the foot of the rainbow. I once knew a man who thought he had 
non-swarmers, but when, at the end of a short season, he had time 
to consider the matter seriously, he concluded that while his colonies 
were strong enough to store a little hone}-, they were not sufficiently 
populous to catch the swarming fever, and it was not a good year 
for swarms anyhow. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 95 

DOESN'T IiIKE THESE FltAlTS. 

I invested in the booklet, "A Radical Cure for the Swarming 
Habit of Bees/' by Dr. Jones, and after studying the system I could 
not bring myself to believe that to be the best method of preventing 
the swarming of bees, so I did not adopt it. It was certainly radical 
enough, and without doubt would fulfill all claims, but it seemed an 
unnecessary sacrifice of brood and waste of bee energy; and, besides, 
it was an extremely disagreeable job and looked too much like 
■"bloody murder." It seemed cruel enough to shave the heads off 
of drone brood, but when it came to destroying worker brood I had 
to draw the line. I tried and studied several other systems of 
swarm control, including the Alexander method of increase and 
control. By the Alexander system the brood is set on top of a 
prepared hive body containing the queen and a frame of brood and 
foundation or empty combs, with an excluder between the two sec- 
tions, and allowed to remain so about ten days. If there is any 
honey coming in it goes into the old brood section above just where 
it is not wanted, and the queen being confined to the lower story, 
there is nothing to prevent the starting of queen cells in the upper 
stor}' and a swarm issuing ahead of time. The shook-swarm system 
( with apologies to Dr. ^filler) is not to be considered. It is too 
fussy and mussy, and cannot be practiced with economy of time and 
labor. The same may be said of taking away frames of brood and 
^substituting empty combs or foundation as a preventive. 

A COMBINATION OF SYSTEMS. 

I then began practicing a combination of two or three systems 
and evolved the following sA'stem of swarm control; and while it is 
in its results nearly the same as shaken swarms, it is far better, and 
eliminates the disagreeable features of that system. It is a short 
cut to the end in view, being a simple and reliable method of con- 
trolling the swarming instinct of bees. There is no shaking of bees 
from the combs, no handling of frames except to find the queen 
(and even that may be omitted), no cutting out of queen cells, no 
imsealed brood left to chill, the lifting of heavy hives is reduced to 
a minimum, no worry about a swarm issuing in the meantime, and 
no extra expense for new fixtures. A slight change in a regular 
bottom board is all that is needed, which will save a lot of lifting 
and turning of hives. Of course, it is to be understood that all 
colonies must be made strong in bees early in the season in order 
to have the bees to catch the white clover flow, which opens here 
about June loth. The hive should be full of brood and eggs early 
in May. A little stimulative feeding helps wonderfully, as the bees 
will build up faster when fed a little warm syrup every evening than 
when depending on their sealed stores. 



96 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



DOUBI.Z: HIVE STANDS. 

The hives are set on douljle hive-stands, one hive on a stand. 
These stands are made of two pieces of 2x4 or 2x6 scantling about 
five feet in length, with cross pieces about fifteen inches long nailed 
at the ends and the corners resting on bricks to level the stands and 
keep them off the ground. It is easier to slide the hives along on 
these stands than to lift or slide them on the ground, and the real 
hard work is eliminated. The bottom boards all have an entrance 
at both front and back, with blocks to close either of them as 
occasion requires. 

THZ: METHOD OF SWARM CONTROI.. 

Now, my method of controlling the swarming is this : When 
the colonies are about strong enough to swarm, and before they 
have started queen cells, if possible, I prepare as many hive bodies 
as there are colonies ready by filling them with empty combs or 
foundation, or both. I then go to the first hive, take ofl: the cover, 
find the comb with the queen and put it with the queen in one of 
the prepared hives, putting in its place an empty comb ; put on a 
queen excluding honey board and set the prepared hive on top ; then 
slip on the cover and go to the next hive, and so on until the queens 
have all been put up. Another way is to drive the queen and bees 
up by drumming on the hive, then slip in the excluder. There 
would then be no handling of frames whatever. I leave them this 
way about ten days. B}^ this time there will be a nice lot of brood 
in the upper story, and the brood in the lower story will all be 
sealed and saved. There will also be some queen cells in most of 
the lower stories. If not, I give them a ripe cell or a queen. 
Swarming is now delayed at least ten days longer, and the forced 
swarm will be made that much nearer the main honey flow. I try 
to get the queens all up about the same time. If they are put up 
about the last week in May or first of June, they will then be set ofif 
just before the main clover honey flow, and this is the best time for 
forced swarms. 

THE FORCED SWARMS. 

We are now ready for some forced swarms. I go to the first 
hive as before, slide it along on the hive stand about eighteen inches, 
blow some smoke in at the entrance, and then drum on the hive and 
drive most of the bees up with the queen, the same as if trans- 
ferring by the Heddon m^ethod. I then lift ofif the upper story and 
set it on a bottom board where the hive originally stood, leaving 
the two stories close together, with the front entrance of the old 
brood section closed and the back entrance opened. The swarm is 
now ready for a super of sections. There is some unsealed honey 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 97 

in the brood combs, and the bees will immediatelv carry it up and 
begin work in the sections. I have an extracting comb at each side 
of the section super, as Mr. Townsend advises, and find it a most 
excellent plan, not only to get the bees started in the sections, but 
TO catch most of this first honey which is mixed with dandelion and 
other spring blossoms. I do not use bait sections. In four or five 
days I carry the brood section to a new stand and open the back 
entrance of the other hive so as to catch the flying bees to further 
strengthen the swarm, which now has an entrance at each end. 
Both entrances are left open during the honey flow. Or the brood 
section may be slid to the farther end of the stand and left there 
with the front entrance open and the back one closed. This will 
save some more lifting. There will be no after swarms. 

GETS STBONCrEK SWASIkXS BV DRIVING. 

By driving I get stronger swarms that will immediately go to 
work in the sections. Otherwise I wotild get onh' what bees are 
in the upper story and the flyers. Such strong swarms will do as 
good work as a colony that has not swarmed at all. 

By this method of management I have never had them swarm 
again unless the driving was done too early in the season. In that 
case they are liable to swarm again at the beginning of the honey 
flow. If they show swarming symptoms at that time, I drive again 
and separate them at once. 

Denison, Iowa. 

[Where one wishes to increase his number of colonies, I should 
consider this a most excellent plan. \Miile Air. Stephens doesn't 
say so, I should consider that the plan is used only in connection 
with the production of comb honey. Such methods are not necessary 
where extracted honey is produced. 

You will notice that the working bees are kept togetiier all the 
time, and at the time the forced swarm is made only sealed brood is 
taken away, and this is allowed to hatch out and build up into a 
colony for winter. The real working force of the hive is never 
divided.] 



A Few Reasons Why Co-Operation Should Succeed 

JAMES H. HEDSTROM. 

y^^O-OPERATION of producers should succeed because your 
I j^^ unit of production (the producer) is constant ; he always re- 
mains the producer; he has no ambition beyond getting a good 
price for his honey. 



98 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Not so with the labor union; the individual member is variable; 
some day he hopes to be the employer or buyer of what formerly he 
had to sell (his labor). So, unconsciously his ambitious w^ork to 
keep his wage low. 

With this great factor removed the co-operation of producers 
has only the ordinary factors of business to contend with, competi- 
tion, supply and demand, etc.. which can all be overcome if honestly 
managed, as proven by the example of hundreds of firms all over 
the country. 

CO-OPERATIVE FAII.UBES. 

The only failures that have come to my notice through the daily 
press were due either to dishonesty, poor management or lack of 
co-operation ; and the latter can almost always be traced to the two 
former. 

With no tariff on honey and co-operation, I feel that the honey 
business is one of the safest investments a man can make. It takes 
brains to manage anything successfully, and brains are what we 
have to pay for and what we should be willing to pay for. 
Calabasas, Cal. 



A Successful Bee-Keeper's Early Experiences, 
Showing That Grit Is Needed. 

JOHN F. OTTO. 

•^'^ EAR FRIEN'D: — ^In answer to your letter of December 8, 
Jf^} 1911, will say: 

1 began bee-keeping as a business twenty-five years ago. 
We had bees at home as far back as I can remember. At first we 
used no other hive but the old German straw hive. About thirty- 
four years ago we got the so-called patent hive, and started to keep 
bees in them, but the success was not very good. The biggest 
drawback was winter losses. I came to the conclusion at that time 
that there was money in keeping bees, if well taken care of. Then 
I attended a business college and started a general store. 

As indoor life did not agree with me, after having 1)een in that 
])usiness for a little over two years, I sold out, and then started 
the bee business exclusively. I kept from ten to twenty-five colonies 
while in the store business, and had twenty-five colonies at the 
time I sold out. Then I saw an advertisement in a paper of twelve 
colonies of bees for sale. Being only four miles from my home, I 
went and bought them. This was in the fall of the year. Then I 
built an overground cellar, and on November 15 I put my thirty- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 99 

seven colonies in the cellar. Next spring the twelve colonies that 
T bought were all dead and the other twenty-five were in good con- 
dition. I could not account for the loss, nor had I any idea what 
was the cause of it. But I was no coward, and was determined to 
make bee-keeping a success. I went to Jefferson, Wis., and bought 
twenty-five colonies more the same spring, and started the season 
with fifty colonies. 

FOUL BROOI> APPEARS. 

The next fall I had 114 colonies rotten with foul brood, as rot- 
ten as they could be ; some only had a handful of bees left. I 
noticed all during the summer that there was something wrong 
with my bees, but did not know what, until in the fall, when I 
subscribed for the American Bcc Journal, and reading" an item on 
foul brood I knew what was the matter with my bees. The next 
spring I got two books on foul brood, and in the latter part of May 
began to cure them. In the fall of that year I had fifty-six colonies 
in good condition, but three of them still had a few foul cells, but 
I left them until next year. 

It took me just five years until I had the disease completely 
rooted out. It was not due to my carelessness in curing them,, 
but when those twelve colonies died, in the spring of that year, 
I gave my bees a chance to clean up the combs from those colonies, 
and all the neighbors' bees had a hand in it, and you certainly 
know what that meant, and what effect that had on my yard in 
the future. But still I did not get discouraged; I was determined 
to make a success in the business and so I did. 

I have wintered about three hundred colonies each year for 
the last ten or twelve years. In the spring I reduce them by 
uniting 175 or 200, so as to have room for swarms and get them 
in good condition by the beginning of the honey flow. I am well 
satisfied with the business. Every business has its drawbacks, and 
so has the bee business, but I am certain that no other business 
pays as well as the bee business according to the investment. But 
I must close with these words, "Keep More Bees." 

Forest Junction, Wis. 

[It was my privilege to meet ]\Ir. Otto at the National Con- 
vention at Minneapolis, for the first time. We had a nice little 
visit and I was impressed with the fact that here was a man who 
was "making good." From others who knew him I found that my 
impression was correct. This gives added weight to the article 
above. What Mr. Otto says only demonstrates that anyone can 
make good at the bee business provided he has the necessary 



100 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




Friend Otto Has Evidently Made a Success in Bee-Keeping. 

"nerve," and will couple it with good common sense. Nothing in 
the above article should discourage a beginner. Rather he should 
rejoice that in spite of the obstacles, success was possible.] 




D. B. Goodspeed Keeps His Bees Near the Road. It's Risky Just the Same. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



101 




No. 1. When the Snow is Deep, the Sleighs are Used. 




No. 2. But in Summer We Use the Wheels. 



102 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Retailing Extracted Honey to Farmers. 

GEO. H. KIRKPATRICK. 

^^-^^OST bee-keepers would like a better price for their honey^ 
1// but fail to get it for various reasons. The producer may 
not have the necessary qualifications of salesmen. I be- 
lieve that the majority of bee-keepers are not salesmen. Then 
there is quite a few who are not especially hand}' in preparing their 
honey for the trade. 

The package should l)e bright and clean, the honey liquid^ 
pail or jars neatly labeled. The man who sells his honey from 
house to house should be gentle in his manner, always meeting his. 
expected customer in a friendly, polite manner, being careful not 
to impose upon their valuable time. ^^'e must try to become 
acquainted with each new customer, and to tell him something of 
our business. We should never say "Mr. Smith's or Mr. Jones's 
honey is of poor quality,'" Init we should see to it that ours is first 
quality. 

In my first experience in selling honey to farmers I drove from 
house to house, being carried in an ordinary cutter drawn by one 
horse. 

A VEHICI.I: FOS Si:i.I.ING- HONE-Z' IN. 

I was soon convinced that my business required a special 
vehicle and that I must have one. I built one (shown in Figs. 
No. 1 and No. 2). I call it my cozy cab. Fig. No. 1 shows the 
cab on a pair of sleighs. Fig. No. 2 the same cab on wheels. In 
the construction of this cab I used three-ply veneered panels in the 
sides and ends, and in the back is a glass 10x22 inches. There are 
two glasses in each side, 16x16. It has a storm front with an 
adjustable sash 1-1x34 inches. Also a pair of sliding doors, one in 
each side. The doors slide into a space between the end of the 
seat and the side of the cab. I have an adjustable sign which I 
place on or above the top, which reads "Honey For Sale, Geo. H. 
Kirkpatrick, Rapid City, Mich." Underneath and back of the seat 
is space sufficient to carry fifty ten-pound pails of honey. 

This department has a panel door in the back end. All doors 
are fitted with lock and key. I can carry seven hundred pounds of 
honey by placing twenty ten-pound pails in front. 

It is important that we bee-keepers use special vehicles to sell 
honey from. As soon as I had made a few trips with this cab it 
appeared that I and my business was known to every person living; 
in the parts where I travel. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 103 

-WHAT FRICZ: TO CKASGE. 

A\'hen I began lousiness here the going price for extracted honey 
was eight cents per pound. At the present date a few bee-keepers 
still sell to the consumer at this very low price. Of course I could 
not produce honey and retail it at this price. I might have said to 
the people I must have 1'2^ cents for my honey, because I couldn't 
afiford to produce honey for less, but I'm afraid I should have had 
a hard time to convince the people that they could afford to buy at 
12j4 cents when it could be had for 6 to 10 cents per pound. The 
thing then for me to do was to produce honey equal or better in 
quality than that produced by my competitors. Nothing will take 
the place of quality in getting better prices. 

GOOB QUALITY NECESSARY. 

I wish to designate retail sales as applying to house-to-house 
canvass. Selling to farmers only, my motto is to always supply my 
customer with the very best honey. This honey is gathered from 
the wild red raspberry blossom. It has a flavor all its own. I find 
raspberry and clover are the best on which to build up a trade. 
They are winners to make customers. We should never extract 
uncapped honey and sell it for table use. For an example, I will 
say honey must be capped before extracting to be classed as No. 1 
honey. Number 1 honey I will rate at 100 per cent. Honey only 
three-quarter capped I will rate at 75 per cent, or 25 per cent below 
the standard, 

I will now give a more practical test. I will make a canvass 
and sell direct to consumer, 500 pounds of No. 1 honey, classed at 
100 per cent. In 30 days I will make a second canvass and find 
almost every individual who bought at the time of the first can- 
vass is ready and anxious for a second pail of honey, and the entire 
community will have learned of the good quality of the honey and 
1,000 pounds of honey will be sold, increasing the sales 100 per cent 
more than those of the first canvass. Had we made the first can- 
vass with the honey classed at 75 per cent, the chances are that 
our sales would have fallen below those of the first canvass. When 
we note that quality makes the dilTerence between success and fail- 
ure, we should readily see how important it is to produce only No. 
1 honey. 

PUTTING IT UP. 

]\Iy honey is heated to a temperature of 135 degrees, then run 
into ten-pound friction top pails and neatly labeled. I use only the 
ten-pound size. More dollars' worth can be sold in a given space 
of time in a ten-pound pail than in a less size. My price is $1.25 
per pail, and the pail retained and collected in on nw next trip. I 

{Continued on page 114) 



104 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editor and Publisher 
Office — 230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 



Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada. Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Discontinuances — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

Advertisini:; rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



A few minutes' headwork will often save several hours" footwork. 



Order your bee supplies early. The bees will soon be swarming. 



Nothing like the tirst days' work in the spring, with the bees 
flying, to start the enthusiasm. 



Honey Butter. 

Chalon Fowler, of Oberlin, Ohio, is selling candied honey, calls 
it "honey-butter." This name suggests the use to which candied 
honey can be put, and he says that it helps him in building up a 
good trade in that kind of honey. This is a suggestion worth 
thinking about. 

Northern Michigan Bee-Keepers' Convention. 

Secretary R. D. Bartlett, of East Jordon, Mich., writes me that 
the convention will be held at Traverse City, Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, March 13th and 14th, with headquarters at the Whiting Hotel. 

Realizing the number of progressive bee-keepers in Northern 
Michigan, there is no question but this will be an important meeting 
to attend. 

The Worcester County Bee-Keepers' Association of Massachusetts. 

They have planned one meeting for each month in the year 
excepting July and August, and the summer field meeting will be 
held during one of those months. One subject is selected for each 
session and the dates of the meetings are all planned in advance. 
This is a new idea to me and one which I consider most excellent. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



105 



A whole year's program being planned in advance enables the local 
bee-kepeers to plan accordingly. 

The subjects for each month are as follows: January, Busi- 
ness; February, The Wintering of Bees; March, Stimulative Feeding 
for Brood Increase ; April, Inspection Work and Elimination of 
Diseases of Bees; May, Swarming and Re-Queening; June, Selected 
Topic, by Hon. J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary of the State Board 
of Agriculture ; September, Products of the Hive ; October, The 
Commercial Side of Bee-Keeping ; November, Production of Comb 
and Extracted Honey ; and December, First Lessons in Bee-Keeping, 
the Elements and Essentials of the Art. 



Clover One Year Old. 



W. E. Krause, of Ridgeland, Wis., writes me as follows: 
"There has been quite a discussion as to whether clover yields 
honey the first or second year. Both arguments are right. 

"Clover sown in early spring will yield a little honey by August 
or September, providing we have a wet season. But the following 
season will be the time we will have the real flow. This same 
clover field will yield the following year. According to nature, 
clover ripens in July. This seed falls to the ground and begins to 
grow and forms a plant to produce the following year, thus making 
the plant one year old when it produces the most honey. But 
farmers generally sow the clover seed with grain. The grain re- 
tards the clover's growth so it can not produce honey till it is about 
fifteen to sixteen months old, i. e., one year from the following July. 
So the Editor of the Review is right when he says clover is one 
year old, providing the clover is self-seeded and has full swing like 
wild flowers, but if anyone says that it produces honey best the 
second year, he is oft" too. We mossbacks around here call it the 







^5. 



Villain, where is my child ? — ( T/ic Leader.) 



106 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

second season and not the second year. Once in a while we let 
Alsike Clover stand till we cut two crops of seed from it. We call 
it the second cutting or second year, but, in reality, it's twenty- 
seven to twenty-eight months old. There is some honey in the 
plants at this cutting." 



Central Minnesota Bee-Keepers Organize, 

Vice-President Wm. Penrod, of Foley, Minn., writes me a short 
report of an organization of bee-keepers being perfected with the follow- 
ing officers: President, J. E. Hughes, of Glendorado; Mce-President, 
Wm. Penrod, Foley, and Secretary-Treasurer, Robert Crinke, address 
not given. 

It is encouraging to see these moves being made along organ- 
ization lines. 



Oklahoma Bee-Keepers' Association. 

This was held at Stillwater, Okla., January 18th. The attend- 
ance was not as large as usual, but the interest Avas good. The 
A. & M. College and Experiment Station was requested to carry on 
experiments to determine a best race of bees, the most useful hive 
for the farmer bee-keeper, and the best manner of feeding bees, also 
to test different honey plants. They also requested that an apiary 
be established at the college. 

Officers elected were : President, M. Fred Gardiner. Geary ; 
Vice-President, Geo. H. Colson, Cherokee ; Secretary, G. C. Bourd- 
man, and Treasurer, G. E. Lemon. 



Eastern New York Bee-Keepers' Association. 

This Society held its fourth annual convention December 21st 
in the City of Albany. The attendance was not quite so large as 
formerly, owing, no doubt, to a short notice that was given and also 
to the extremely poor season the past year. Secretary's report 
shows 103 members, which is a good growth for four years. 

The question of becoming a National branch was brought up 
and decided that a vote should be taken by mail on the question. 
Officers elected were : President, W". D. Wright, of Altamont ; 
Vice-President. A. Johnson, of Schoharie ; Second Vice-President, 
C. W. Hayes, Brookvieer; Secretary, S. Davenport, of Indian Fields; 
Treasurer, M. A. Kingman, East Greenbush. S. Davenport was 
elected delegate to the annual meeting of the New York State Agri- 
cultural Society. This Society also will petition the New York 
State Department of Agriculture to experiment along the line of 
reducing the length of the red clover corolla tubes. Proposition 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 107 

was also made to establish a Honey Exchange at Albany for the 
purpose of disposing of members' honey. This is a co-operative 
move along the right lines. 

An investigating committee was appointed to report at the next 
meeting on this question. 



Iowa Bee-Keepers' Organization. 

A report from the President, W. P. Southworth, Salix, Iowa, 
states that the Iowa Bee-Keepers have just formed an Association 
for themselves. Besides the President above named, C. L. Pinnoy, 
of Lemars, Iowa, was elected Secretary-Treasurer, and three Vice- 
Presidents were chosen as follows: Frank C. Pellett, Atlantic; 
Frank Coverdale, Delmar, and J. L. Strong, of Clarinda. 

The Association is to be a branch of the National, with dues 
fixed at $1.50 per year. 

The first work will be to arrange for a big convention, which 
will be held at a convenient time for the largest number of bee- 
keepers. At that meeting the organization will be perfected and 
immediate steps taken to prevent the spreading of bee diseases in 
that state. In closing the President says, "No state in the union 
can produce better honey than Iowa, and by mutual assistance the 
bee-keepers can greatly increase their yields and improve market 
conditions. Let everyone interested in Bee Culture join the big 
cluster at once by sending in his name and any suggestion that he 
has to offer." 



The New York Bee-Keepers' Tablet. 

On the front cover of a large, letter-sized tablet, is a great big 
picture of a queen- bee. Just below are three smaller pictures 
showing a queen, a worker and a drone. 

Lifting up the cover we find rather an extended write-up on 
the bee and her products. Following this comes a full page blotter 
and then, of course, the regular writing paper that a tablet should 
contain. 

This is put out by the New York bee-keepers as general pub- 
licity advertising. No particular class is appealed to, and no 
address for further information is given. It is intended only to 
increase the general use of honey. I hardly know how to comment 
on this effort, for, when it comes to advertising, there are so many 
things to consider that it is hard to give an oft"hand opinion. 

Tablets, as a rule, are used principally by children, and if this 
particular tablet is to be placed on sale, to be purchased and used 
by children, it would strike me at first that the reading is heavy. 



108 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

My suggestion would be to weave the whole into a short interest- 
ing story. Then again I have found that attention is attracted 
greatly by pictures. I would rather use pictures of the thing you 
wish to sell. You don't want to sell bees so I would make them 
secondary. Let the honey stand out strongly, with the bees in the 
background. Then in the description tell something about why 
there is such a difference in the flavor of honey, how the little 
sections are produced, what extracted honey is, and such things of 
general interest as would command the attention of the general 
public. 

Please do not understand by the above that I do not appreciate 
the progress shown by these New York bee men, for I certainly 
do, and compliment them. Any effort to advertise honey is com- 
mendable, and if I thought what I have written above would in any 
way discourage it, I would throw it into the waste basket too 
quick. I only mention it so these things may be considered by 
others in a like effort. 

N. B. Since the above was set up in t3'pe, I attended the 
Syracuse meeting and learned more concerning the tablet. It is to 
be sold to the general trade and by them to the school children. 
Bee-keepers are expected to assist in creating this trade. It is a 
move worthy of emulation by other Associations. A sample of the 
tablet can be secured by writing any of the officers of the New York 
Association and enclosing ten cents for tablet and postage. 



That New York State Convention at Syracuse. 

It was a dandy. From the beginning to the end there wasn't 
a single dull minute. It was my first visit with New York Bee- 
Keepers, and I must confess I found them a live bunch. You could 
tell from the discussions that they were not amateurs either. Many 
were there who made their entire living from their bees. 

One thing which impressed me, was the way those fellows dove 
into an argument. It was no lukewarm affair either. But when 
it was all over there wasn't a bit of unpleasant feeling that I could 
see anywhere. To me, at least, those red hot discussions are the 
cream of a convention. I thoroughly enjoyed every bit of it. 

Quite a brisk discussion was brought up as a result of my 
remarks as to what the "National" hoped to do this year. It 
seems that the New York bee men have not been entirely satisfied 
with what it has done in the past, and several years ago that state 
withdrew in a body. Thc}^ seemed to be favorable to the new 
plans, however, and while no vote was taken I firmly believe that 
if there had been it would have been favorable to the "National." 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 109 

Some thought it would be better for the county associations to 
become branches, instead of the state, as that would give them a 
better representation at the annual meetings. I believe the plan a 
good one. 

While I was much interested in the remarks of all who appeared 
on the program, I was especially interested in what Prof. 11. A. 
Surface, of Pennsylvania, and Mr. R. F. tlolterman, of Ontario, had 
to say. Both these speakers brought out some pertinent truths and 
left 3, very favorable impression on their hearers. 

The New York Association is the first one, I believe, to start 
a definite plan for the national advertising of honey. This they 
are doing by the publication of a tablet, mention of which is made 
elsewhere in this isue. These tablets are made for them by a firm 
in Massachusetts, and can be sold to the retailer at 42:c per dozen. 
The tablet retails for five cents. 

The New York Department of Agriculture was asked to take 
steps to investigate the "Isle of Wight Disease," which has appeared 
in England. It was not thought best, however, to import the 
disease in order to investigate it. A petition will also be sent to 
the U. S. Government asking that they also take such steps as are 
necessary to prevent this disease getting a foothold in this country. 

Resolutions of thanks were sent to Prof. Wiley for his work in 
the interest of a pure food law. A resolution was also passed that 
the state foul brood inspectors be authorized by the Department of 
Agriculture, of New York, to encourage the formation of local bee- 
keepers' societies. The Department will also be asked to experiment 
in the production of red clover with shorter corolla tubes. Prof. H. 
J. Weber, Department of Plant Breeding, College of Agriculture, 
Ithaca, N. Y., in a letter, stated that he believed such a thing would 
be easily accomplished. 

In discussing the honey markets at this time, and the apparent 
over-supply of extracted honey, it was brought out that last year 
the conditions were exactly the reverse in the New York markets. 
There was a big over-supply of comb honey last year, and that 
turned many over to the production of extracted honey this year. 
It was also reported that in New York they are putting out a com- 
pound of honey that is taking the place of honey, and causing the 
low price. 

L. Coggshall states it costs 3 cents per pound to get comb honey 
on the market, and 3^-cent for extracted. He also stated that he 
could get more white honey on clay soil than he can from sandy. 

R. F. Holterman used to think that the better the soil the 
better the quality of honey. Too strong soil allows buckwheat to 
go down. He now thinks that whatever soil is adapted to the plant 
produces the best honey. 



110 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Japanese buckwheat was reported as more reliable for a honey 
yield. 

A. J. Brewer stated that with no bottom board, a proper cover 
and good stores, no cold can kill bees. This is encouraging to us 
in this cold winter we have been having. He uses a plain simplicity 
hive, presses a burlap sack down in an empty upper story, fills it 
with forest leaves so full that the cover presses on the packing. 
Entrance is from 3^ to 5/g inches, by the width of the hive. Has 
no side packing, and gets good results. 

Holterman believes you can use a larger hive for outdoor win- 
tering than you can for indoor. He says good stores, bees kept 
<iO^ given proper ventilation and packed with leaves is good winter 
insurance. He uses a queen-excluder on his hives for winter, which 
act as a "Hill device." He has two holes in cover of packing case, 
above the packing, and advocates that the packing not touch the 
cover. 

F. C. Hotchkiss, Massina Springs. N. Y., has fed as high as 20 
pounds of syrup to a colony in the cellar during winter. He uses 
a shallow pan pushed in at the entrance, and feeds warm syrup. 
Another member tried it and found it caused a general disturbance. 
Mr. Hotchkiss' cellar was from 4i to 51 degrees in temperature. 

I. Kinyon reported increasing trouble with comb honey souring. 
Some others reported the same trouble. It seems that they are 
also having more trouble with it candying, and it developed that 
quite a little alfalfa was now being grown in that state, which they 
believe accounts for the latter trouble. 

Prof. Surface says the cause of swarming is to escape adverse 
conditions. R. F. Holterman says that the first cause of swarming 
is the production of drones; second, queen cups; third, small en- 
trance. Advocates giving room early, and shade. He uses large 
entrances, as does also S. D. House. 

A pu1)lic grading of honey, at conventions, was suggested by 
Prof. Surface, and the writer believes this an excellent suggestion.. 

President Howe says that inbreeding means using male and 
female of the same family more than once, and that it is impossible 
to inbreed bees. He also says that you can better your bees with- 
out buying a single queen. 

D. R. Hardy, Burr Mills, N. Y., has built up a splendid strain 
of bees by starting the year of the Vi^orld's Fair in St. Louis, with 
a Carniolan queen and breeding to an Italian drone. It has simply 
been a case of selecting ever since. 

It developed that there were 500 colonies of bees kept within 
the city limits of Syracuse. 

The next meeting place will be at Rochester. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 111 



SELECTED ARTICLES 

AND EDITORIAL COMMENTS 



Bees Furnish Money to Buy 160 Acres of Land. 

L. E. Evans, of Onsted, Michigan, tells us in Gleanings that 
his bees have furnished him sufficient money to purchase 160 acres 
of land. He is also using insulating paper for packing cases, pack- 
ing each colony separate with planer shavings. 



Growing Nectar, Rearing Plants and Trees. 

Wesley Foster tells in the American Bee Journal of a county 
bee-keepers' association in Ohio that is going after securing honey 
flora in the right way. They advise the railroads to save their 
embankments by sowing sweet clover. Friend Foster believes that 
local associations can do much in furnishing honey-producing trees 
to all who will plant them. Same could be applied to the furnishing 
of Alsike Clover seed. 



Why Clover Does Not Yield Honey as It Did in Olden Times. 

In an editorial in Gleanings, Editor Root throws some light on 
why some soils will not produce clovers as they used to. Summed, 
up, the trouble seems to be in most cases, that the soil is deficient 
in lime. By advising the farmers to send a sample of soil to their 
^Agricultural College for analysis, when if lime is deficient it can be 
applied, bee-keepers will reap the harvest of an increasing clover 
honey ilow from the increasing crop of clover the farmers would 
produce. Where Alsike grows better than the June, it is an indi- 
cation that the soil lacks lime. 



Supporting Foundation to Prevent Buckling. 

Charlie Brown, of Piru, Cal., after considerable experimenting 
v/ith dififerent methods of wires and the use of splints, has finally 
settled down to the use of four wires and four splints for a Lang- 
stroth frame. The wires are stretched horizontal and pulled tight, 
while the splints are used vertical. In a footnote the Editor of 
Gleanings states that H. E. Thayer has been using common bailing- 
wires in place of the wooden splints. 



112 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Bee-Keepers' Convention. 

An editorial in the Avicrican Bee Journal discusses the best 
method of arranging a convention program in order that interest 
may be aroused and maintained by those in attendance. This is 
called forth by the remarks of J. L. Byer, in which he states that 
too much business can be injected in a convention program. Per- 
sonally, I find that the regular conventions, v^diere the mass of 
bee-keepers attend, should be devoted mainly to discussing current 
topics of bee-keeping. These should be selected with a view to 
bringing out discussions from all present and must be questions 
they are all interested in. The business, on the other hand, can 
best be done by delegates, which session should be held apart from 
the others so that they will not interfere with the regular program. 
Byer is right in believing that too much business can be injected 
into a regular Bee-Keepers' Convention. 



Fraudulent Packing. 

Bulletin No. 142, issued by the Agricultural Experiment Stations 
of Texas, has this to say of the fraudulent packing of honey: 

"A deceptive method of packing bulk comb honey has recently 
come to our attention and it cannot be too strongly condemned, 
both by customers and honest bee-keepers. As explained on a pre- 
ceding page, bulk comb honey, when properly packed, consists of 
cans filled full of comb honey, the latter cut into just as large 
pieces as will go into the can. What few openings then remain are 
filled with extracted honey. 

"Some bee-keepers have, however, adopted the plan of filling 
the honey cans only about one-third full of comb and then filling up 
the can with extracted honey. (Jf course the pieces of comb float 
on top of the extracted honey and when the customer takes ofif the 
cover the can appears to be filled with comb honey. The deception 
is not discovered until the ctistomer has purchased the can and used 
out about a fourth of its contents. Such a deception is little short 
of actual fraud, for Inilk comb honey usually sells at from two to 
five cents per pound higher than extracted and when the customer 
pays higher price for bulk comb he is certainly entitled to it, not to 
a mixture containing To per cent of a lower-priced honey." 



The Big and the Small Bee-Keeper. 

The Canadian Bee Journal has an excellent editorial in its Janu- 
ar}'' number concerning the relation between the big and the little 
bee-keeper. I'he writer of that editorial stated that he was much 
surprised to find a lack of sympathy on the part of a successful 
producer of honey towards the little producer. Quoting him we 
read : 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 113 

"Our friend, skilled in his profession, and fortunate in his 
markets, did not recognize the need of any combined ameliorative 
efforts seeing that he himself was not requiring any such assistance 
to attain a high degree of success. 

"We fear that his was not an isolated case. In spite of all the 
arguments advanced in favor of an effort to organize the honey 
producers, the matter was allowed to drop in convention without 
any pretence to a debate. The fact is that the hundred or so big 
bee men that attend conventions cannot be said to be at all repre- 
sentative of the thousands of bee-keepers scattered through the 
country, the majority being located at distances far too great to 
permit of their being present at these annual deliberations. We 
wish to be frank. A truly representative gathering should be ready 
to consider more particularly the needs of the great mediocrity, 
who, as in all walks of life, after all form the majority."' 

We must not forget that our interests are so interwoven that 
we cannot allow the little bee-keeper to suffer without receiving a 
part of that injury ourselves. Beginners will continually come to 
our ranks and the best way is to give those beginners the hecessary 
advice and co-operation which is not only an evidence of the proper 
fraternal spirit, but will result in the greatest good to ourselves. 



Isle of Wight Disease. 

D. JM. [McDonald, of Banff, Scotland, gives a description in 
Gleanings of the Isle of Wight disease, which shows that it is appar- 
ently bowel disease of the adult bee. Quoting him, we read as 
follows : 

"The symptoms at first are indistinct, so that the scourge has 
a deadly hold before any very clear signs are patent. A marked 
decrease in the number of bees occupying surplus chambers shows 
something is amiss; fewer bees go out foraging; even the bees 
which are apparently healthy show a disposition to loiter about, 
and exhibit a disinclination to go to the fields. Therefore, large 
numbers are found lolling about on the flight-board — so much so 
that on a fine day it is black with them, as if they were in need 
of more room overhead. An examination of the top super, how- 
ever, shows it quite deserted, owing to lessening numbers. 

"On close inspection an odd bee at first is seen flying aimlessly 
about. It or others may be seen crawling on the ground near the 
hive, making ineifectual attempts to fly. Looking more closel}' 
the wings are seen to make futile efforts to buoy the insect up mto 
the air. On examining these bees it will be found that, generally, 
one of the small wings (almost invariably the left) may be seen 
sticking out at an angle above the front wing in an unnatural way. 
and looking as if it were dislocated. These bees then crawl about 



114 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

aimlessly, dragging their legs in a crippled way. They congregate 
in small clusters, numbering from half a dozen to a score, as if 
seeking mutual warmth. Many of them make feeble attempts to 
climb up any vegetation growing near, but after a time they fall 
down to die. While crawling about, the abdomen is heavily de- 
pressed. It appears of abnormal size, and drags as if too heavy to 
be fully supported. In this advanced stage of the disease the 
interior of the hive, if examined, shows a sorry spectacle. The bees 
display none of the well-known energy so markedly symptomatic 
of a colony in full health during the active season. Breeding is, 
however, encouraged to a late period ; but with the decreasing 
numbers it wanes until at last queens are entirely neglected and 
cease to lay. Then the rapid diminution of the numbers is most 

marked.'' 

Retailing Elxtracted Honey to Farmers. 

{Concluded from Page lo^) 

have proven by repeated experiments that I can sell more dollars 

worth of honey per day at 12^2 cents per pound than I can at 

10 cents per pound. 

It is not the number of pounds of honey we sell per day that 
counts. It is the number of dollars we gather in pet day. If I sell 
to my customers 400 pounds per day at 10 cents per pound then 
the amount of my sales is $40.00. If I had sold this same honey 
at 12^ cents per pound, my sales would have amounted to $50.00, 
a net gain of $10.00. It may be that this advance in price from 
10 cents to I'iy^ cents per pound may make the difference between 
milure and success in our business. 

GAIT SEIiIi AI.Ii THE 'X'EAS. 

Honey can be sold to farmers at all seasons of the year but 
sells best in winter. I have 500 farmer customers who will use from 
one to five 10-pound pails each winter if promptly supplied. A 
people promptly supplied will use much honey. I always explain 
to each new customer all about the honey I deliver to him. One 
should never leave a customer to guess from what source the honey 
was gathered. If I sell to a customer a pail containing a different 
flavor of honey from that sold to him on a former date I explain to 
him, always telling him from what plant it was gathered, raspberry, 
clover or milkweed, as the case may be. 

Rapid City, Mich. 

[]\Ir. Kirkpatrick is developing a part of our industry that has 
been sadly neglected, that of selling to the farmer trade. So many 
of us have thought only of the city man as a possible customer. The 
buying power of the farmer today is away ahead of many in the 
city, and with the bees going more and more into the hands of the 
specialist, there should be a rapidly increasing field for honey sales 
among the farming class.] 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



115 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 



1 a^M«»sw 




FANCY 



NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



There has been practically no change in the honey market since last 
month's quotations, so several of the quotations are left standing just as they 
were in the February issue. The market should be as good in ^ilarch as it 
can be expected to be before the next year's crop comes in the market. 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey 17c to 
18c. Light amber 16c. Amber 15c. Fancy 
white extracted 10c to lie. Light amber and 
amber extracted 8c to 9c. Wax 30c. 

BLAKE LEE CO.. 

Feb. 19. 4 Chatham Row. 

TOLEDO. — Replying to your postal of 
1/lSth, beg to advise that there is practically 
no change in quotations from our last. All 
grades of honey are quiet, and owing to cold 
weather, we do not look for any demand until 
the weather moderates. Beeswax is in fair 
demand and brings from 30 to 35c, depending 
on quality. 

Jan. 19th. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 



DENVER. — We are quoting our local market 
in a jobbing way as follows: No. 1 white comb, 
per caes of 24 sections, S3, 60; No. 1 light am- 
ber, $3.40: No. 2, $3.15. White extracted 
honey per lb., 9c; light amber 8c, and strained 
6J4 to TJ^c. We pay 26c in cash and 2Sc in 
trade for clean yellow beeswax delivered here. 
THE COLORADO HONEY PRO- 
DUCERS' ASSN. 

Jan. 22. F. Rauchfuss, Mgr. 



CINCINNATI.— Market on comb honey has 
fallen off somewhat, only demand for fancy 
white, selling in retail way at $4.00, to jobbers 
at $3.60 to $3.75, according to quantity. Extra 
white extracted in 60 pound cans at 10 cents, 
light amber in 60 pound cans at 8J4 cents, 
amber in barrels 7 to 7^ cents, beeswax fair 
demand at $33.00 per hundred. 

Above are selling prices, not what we are 
paying. 

Jan. 20. C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 

CHICAGO — Trade in honey is not active ex- 
cept in small amounts to supply immediate 
wants. For fancy comb honey (of which there 
is not an over-supply) 17c to 18c per lb. is ob- 
tainable, but for the off grades a reduction ol 
from Ic to 5c per lb. is given to make sales. 



Extracted is steady. Volume of sales are small 
with white averaging from 8c to 9c per lb., 
ambers 7c to 8c per lb. Beeswax is steady and 
in good demand at from 30c to 32c per lb. 
Feb. 24. R. A. BURNETT & CO. 

173 W. South Water St. 



KANSAS CITY, MO.— The supply of both 
comb and extracted honey is not large, and the 
demand is not heavy. We quote: No. 1 white 
comb, 24 sec. cases at $3.25; No. 2 white 
comb, 24 sec. cases at $3.00; No. 1 amber 
comb, 24 sec. cases at $3.00; No. 2 amber, 24 
sec. cases at $2.75; extracted white, per lb., 
Syi to 9c; extracted amber, per lb., 8 to 8^2c; 
extracteddark, per lb., Syic; beeswax, dark, per 
lb., 25 to 28c. 

Jan. 22. C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 



CINCINNATI.— The condition of the honey 
market reminds one of a ship that is beached, 
and must await the high tide to move it. It is 
useless to try to offer any inducements to make 
sales, and to cut prices, owing to the small 
profit, would not only be a loss but would ruin 
the conditions. Nevertheless, we do not over- 
look opportiuiities to make sales. For the 
fancy grades of table honey we are getting 
from 10c to lie a pound in 60-lb. cans, and 
for amber honey of the better grades from 
8c to 9c, while for the low grades from 6c to 
7c, according to the quality and quantity pur- 
chased. These are our selling prices: Comb 
honey is moving somewhat slower than for 
some time back, and we are now getting from 
$3.75 to $4.00 a case. For choice, bright yel- 
low beeswax, we are paying 30c a pound in 
cash, delivered here. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO. 

Feb. 25. 51 Walnut street. 



NEW YORK — We have practically nothing 
new to report as to the condition of the 
market. Very little comb honey arriving, and 
what little lots do come in find ready sale at 
prices ranging all the way from 14c to 17c for 



116 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



the white and from lie to 13c for dark and 
amber, according to quality and style of 
package. 

As to extracted honey, the market is decid- 
edly quiet. Ever since the first of December 
the demand has been gradually decreasing and 
with large stocks on hand prices have shown a 
downward tendency and are likely to decline 
still further. We quote nominally: California 
white sage at 9c; western white alfalfa at 8c; 
western light amber alfalfa at from 7c to T'/lc; 
in quantity lots even these prices would have 
to be shaded in order to effect sale. 

Beeswax steady at from 30c to 31c per 
i>ound. „ , 

Feb. 24. HILDRETH & SEGELKEN. 



=o 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 



BEES AND QUEENS. 



Colonies of Italian Bees in L. hives, 10- 
fr., full of stores — any time. Jos. Wallrath, 
Antioch, Cal. 



OuEENS AND NUCLEI. — A strain of Italians 
developed for honey-gathering ability. My en- 
tire time has been given to them for 12 years. 
W. D. AcHORD, Fitzpatrick, Bullock Co., Ala. 

Golden Italian Oueens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each ?1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 

Golden Queens.— Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, five 
and six band, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also 
nuclei and full colonies. Send for circular and 
price list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., 
Philadelphia, Pa^ 

Golden and 3-Banded Italians. — Tested, $1 
each. 3 queens, $2.75; 6 or more, 85c each. 
Untested, 75c each; 3 queens, $2; 6 or more, 
65c each. Bees per pound, $1. Nuclei, six- 
frame, $1.25. (No disease here.) C. B. 
Bankston, Buffalo, Texas. 

Quirin's famous improved Italian queens, 
nuclei, colonies, and bees by the pound, ready 
in May. Our stock is northern-bred and 
hardy; five yards wintered on summer stands 
in 1908 and 1909 without a single loss. For 
prices, send for circular. Quirin-the-Queen- 
Breeder, Bellevue, O. 

For Sale. — 175 colonies of bees in S-frame 
hives, run for comb honey, with 500 comb- 
honey supers, and about 35 full-depth hive- 
bodies filled with honey for next season's feed- 
ing. I am close to the Nevada State-line. No 
foul brood in this valley. H. Christensen, 
Coleville, Mono Co., Cal. 

Buy your Queens where there is no foul 
brood. Either strain of Italians. Tested, $1.00 
each; 3 or more. 90 cents. Untested, 75 cents 
each; 3 to 6, 70 cents; 6 to 12 or more, 65 
cents. Bees, per pound, $1.00. Nuclei, per 
frame, $1.25 (no disease). C. B. Bankston, 
Buffalo, Texas. 



For Sale.- — Early Italian (Frofalcon) Queens. 
February and March deliveries for untested, 
$1.50 each; April, $1.25; Tested Queens, 50 
cents additional. Select tested, $1.00 extra. 
Breeders, prices upon application. Sweet Clo- 
ver and Alfalfa Seed. Send for prices. John 
C. Frohliger, Berkeley, Cal. 257-9 Market 
St., San Francisco. 



HONEV AND -VtTAZ. 

For Sale.- — Amber and buckwheat honey in 
new 60-lb. tin cans. C. J. Baldriuge, Home- 
stead Farm, Kendaia, N. Y. 

Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. Hildreth & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

For Sale. — Clover, clover-basswood blend, 
milk-week, and raspberry extracted honey in 
packages to suit. A. G. Woodman Co., Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

For Sale. — Choice light-amber extracted 
honey — thick, well ripened, delicious flavor. 
Price 9 cts. per lb. in new 60-lb. cans. 

J. P. Moore, Morgan, Ky. 

For Sale. — Water white and light-amber 
alfalfa and light-amber fall honey, put up in 
any size packages. First class. 

Dadant & Sons, Hamilton, 111. 

For Sale. — Clover, basswood, alfalfa, sage or 
light amber fall honey. F^irst-class stock put 
up in any sized cans. Send for price list. M. 
V. Facey, Preston, Fillmore Co., Minn. 



iaiSCEI.I.ANEOVS. 



Typewriter for Sale. — Standard machine, 
very cheap; good shape. Wm. Ehlers, Carth- 
age, Mo. 

W LL PAY 20 cents each for February, 1904, 
April or June, 1910, numbers of the Bee- 
Keepers' Review. O. A. Keen, Topeka, Kans. 

In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton, Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 

For Sale. — One new bee hive, double walled. 
Hatch wax-press, and bee papers. F. T. 
Hooper, E. Downington, Pa. 

For Sale. — Empty second-hand 60-lb. cans, 
as good as new, two cans to a case, at 25 cts. 
per case. C. H. W. Weber & Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 

Penna. Bee Keepers: Having bought supply 
business of (Jeo. H. Rea, can furnish complete 
line of Roots goods. Full car just in; catalog 
free. Thos. H. Litz, Osceola Mills, Pa. 

For Sale or Exchange. — Gasoline engine, 
belting, shafting, etc. Buttercups, S. C. W. 
Leghorns for sale. Claud Irons, Linesville, 
Pa^ ^ 

For Sale — A. I. Root Supplies. Every- 
thing needed in the apiary. Send for cata- 
logue. Prices right. Sawyer & FIedden, Irv- 
ington. New Jersey. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



117 



For Sale. — New crop of alfalfa seed; 4 
pounds by mail, prepaid, $1.10; 50 to 100 lbs., 
14 1/^ cts. per lb. Sacks, 25 cts. extra. 

R. L. Snodgr.^ss, Rt. 4, Augusta, Kansas. 

The Egner System of Bee-Keeping will in- 
crease both your colonies and honey crop. 
Union bee-hive and queen. Price ten cents. 
Bee and poultry supplies for sale or exchange. 
Jos Egner, Lavergne, 111. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 



Free. — Catalogue of Bee-keepers and Poul- 
try supplies, describing our goods. Also of 
Barred and White Plymouth and White Wyan- 
dotte chickens. Best of goods. Lowest price. 
Square treatment. Prompt shipment. H. S. 
DuBY, St. Anne, 111. 



FOSITIOirS AND EEIiF. 

W.^NTED. — Position with bee-keeper in South- 
ern California. Can give the best of referen- 
ces. C. B. B.\XTER, Nauvoo, 111. 

Wanted. — Assistant apiarist. Must be steady, 
honest, and willing to go to Colorado or !Mon- 
tana as needed. The Rocky Mount.\in Bee 
Co., Berthoud, Colo. 

W.\XTED. — Position by young man of good 
habits with a bee-keejier in the Soutli ,\tlantic 
Coast States; has had experience in a small 
home apiary. Can give good reference as to 
character, reputation, etc. Marcls Eggers. 
Rt. 1, Eau Claire, Wis. 

Wanted. — Apiarist who has had experience, 
and who knows how to raise good queens cheap- 
ly; who can do any work with bees alone, yet 
follow instructions when given. Give refer- 
ence. State wages wanted first letter. II. C. 
Ahlers, West Bend, Wis. 

Wanted. — Help for the actiz'e bee season of 
1912 — one or two young men who want to 
learn bee-keeping; board promised, and a little 
more if we do well. Wanted, also, a carload 
of bees, spring delivery. 

R. F. Holtermann, 
Brantford, Ont., Canada. 



KEAIi ESTATE. 

For Sale. — 560 acres of land in Arkansas, in 
the rice belt. Half cash; balance, city property. 
T. J. Greenfield, Hickory Ridge, Ark. 

Wanted. — House, some land, fifty colonies 
or more of bees. N. C. Davenport, 2300 Lunt 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

For Sale. — Old homestead farm of lo,-< 
acres; good buildings: best farm in the neigh- 
borhood; $40 per acre. H. S. Thompson, 
Franklin Forks, Pa. 



Fruit Lands, general store in English col- 
ony; apiary locations for sale, rent, or trade; 
bees, queens, honey, wax hives, and other sup- 
plies; fine opportunity for tropical bee-man with 
small capital; climate and lands finest in the 
world. Gather honey the year round. No land 
agent. I own all I offer. D. W. Millar, 

Bartle, Oriente, Cuba. 



POULTRY. 



Buff Orpingtons — S. C. Cook's birds di- 
rect. Great winter layers. 15 eggs $2.00. R. 
B. Chipman, Clifton Heights, Del. Co., Pa. 

Partridge Wvandottes. — Adapted to any 
climate; eggs and stock for sale. C. M. Myers, 
Winchester, Ind. 

Buttercupa and Houdans for large white 
eggs. Fine cockerels $3.00 and $5.00. 
Riverview Poultry Farm, Union City, Mich. 

For Sale. — Silver Spangled Hamburgs, Stock 
and Eggs. Eastman Kodak, takes pictures :i'/^ 
by o'/i; good as new. H. L. Bowers, Pint 
Royal, Pa. R. F. D. 1. 

"Eggmakers" — S. C. Brown Leghorns. State 
wide reputation. Cockerels $2.00, $3.00 and 
$5.00 each by return express. Wii. J. Cooper, 
Mt. Pleasant, Rt. S, Mich. 

Ringlet Barred Plymouth Rocks. — Fine, 
healthy, well barred cockerels and pullets at 
$2.00 each. Prize winners at our County Fair. 
R. J. Schloneger, Pigeon, Mich. 

Pigeons I Pigeons! — Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
3ur specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

I H.WE A flock of most beautiful Indian 
Runner ducks, correctly mated, which have 
proven beyond a doubt to be the twentietli- 
century egg-machines. I will book orders from 
now on, and ship when so ordered, 13 pure- 
white eggs for $1.00. Satisfaction guaranteed 
or money refunded. This advertisement will 
be lived up to, to the letter. Robert Bird, Rt. 
2, Pinckneyville, Ills. 



EXTRACTOR FOR SALE 



A four-frame (Langstrothj Root 
Automatic, reversible, Xo. 25, with a 
slip-i^ear. A new machine now costs 
$2.5, but we will sell this at a good 
discount, and it has been used only 
two seasons and is practically a new 
machine. Write for prices. 



MRS. W. Z. HUTCHINSON, 
Flint, Mich. 



FREE 



Book on Grape Culture 

Instructions for planting, cultivating 
and pruning; also descriptions of best 
varieties for vineyard or home garden. Profusely illus- 
trated. Issued by tlie largest growers of grape vinesnnd 
small fruits in the country. Millions of vinesfor sale. 
T. S. HUBBARD CO., Cox 48, Fredonia, N. Y. 



Italian, Cyprian, Carniolan, Caucasian and 
Banat Queens. Bee Supplies. Honey Packages. 
AVAI.TER C. MORRIS. 



74 C'ortlandt St.. 

\.>»v ^ OfU- fifv. 



Y. 



118 



THE BEE-KEEPERS REVIEW 



MEXICO AS 
A BEE COUNTRY 

_ B. A. Hadsell, one of the largest bee-keepers 
in the world, has made six trips to Mexico, 
investigating that country as a bee country, 
and IS so infatuated with it that he is closing 
out his bees in Arizona. He has been to great 
expense in getting up a finely illustrated 32- 
page booklet describing the tropics of Alexico 
as a Bee ]\Ian's Paradise, which is also su- 
perior as a farming, stock raising and fruit 
country, where mercury ranges between 55 
and 98. Frost and sun-stroke is unknown. 
Also a great health resort. He will mail this 
book free by addressing 

B. A. HADSELL, Lititz, Pa. 



WANTED 
WHITE HONEY 



Both comb and extracted. Write 

us before disposing of 

your crop. 



HILDRETH & SEGELKEN 

265-267 Greenwich St. 

New York, N. Y. 

Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

Bright, Powerful, Economical. 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in your home. If your 
dealer hasn't got them, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
many as you want at 25c each. 
AGEXTS WANTED EVERY- 
WHERE. 

THE STEEL MANTLE LIGHT CO. 

332 Huron St., Toledo, O. 





SUPERIOR 
CARNIOLAN QUEENS 

Write for our paper, "Superi- 
ority Carniolan Bees," giving 
our 10 years' experience witli 
this race, general description, 
points of suiJeriority, best system of 
management, prices of our Queens, etc. 
IT'S FREE. 

ALBERT G. HANN, 

Soientitic Queen Breeder, 

Pittstown, Xew Jersey. 



CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 
in 

HoMey, Beeswax, Maple Sugar and 
Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1S75. 




Established 1SS5 
WE CARRY AX UP-TO-DATE LIXE OF 

Bee-keepers' Supplies 

Write for our 50-page catalog 
free, and for lowest prices on 
supplies. Full information 

given to all inquiries. We 
handle the best make of goods 
for the bee-keeper. 

Freight facilities good. Let 
us hear from you. 
John Xebel & Son Supply Co., High Hill, Mo. 

GENUINE CARNIOLAN ALPINE 
Q.UEENS. My breeders were imported direct 
from Carniola, Austria. They are very hardy, 
large and gentle, great hustlers, and white cap- 
pers. I also have fine Italians and Banats bred 
in separate yards, 75 cents each, $8 Doz. Cir- 
cuUir free. GRANT ANDERSON, San 
Beuito, Texas. 



ALSIKE CLOVER SREn 

Medium red, large red, alfalfa. Sweet clo- 
ver and grass seeds in general ; also 

SEED CORN 

Several varieties and thoroughbred. Write 
for prices and catalog apiary supplies. All 
seeds of high purity. 



Carroll Co. 



.SNRI.I,, 
3Iilledseville, 111. 




At Last — A Coinfortable Motorcycle 

The Ful-Floteing seat on the new 
Harley-Davidson Motorcycle eliminates 
jolts, jars and all vibrations. The Free- 
wheel Control, another exclusive fea- 
ture makes it possible to start the 
Harley-Davidson like an automobile, 
without pedaling or runninj; alongside 
to start motor. Write for catalog. 
Harley-Davidson Motor Co., 344 A St., Milwaukee 



American Butter & Cheese 
Co., 

31-33 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 

Always in the market for choice 
comb honey. Write us. 

GRAPE VINES 

Best varieties for vineyard and garden. Mil- Send lor 
lions of vines for sale. Our free book giv s F* R ir F 
instruction for planting, cultivating and prun- onn^ 
ing. Profusely illustrated. Issued by the "OUH 
largest growers of grape vines and small fruits in the 
country. T. S. HUBBARD CO., Box 48, Fredonia, N Y 



SWEET CLOVER 

Seed, for winter sowing' on top ground. 
Circular how to grow it free. 

Bokhara Seed Co., Box 2!)fi-C, 
Kill month, Ky. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



119 



LARGE ORDERS 

For 



u. 



.ft 



falcon 

Bee - Keepers' Supplies 



Hivos. Sfi'tioiis, KoiMKlsitioiis, 

Etf. (AH Oiir 0>vii M:iiiii- 

t'su'tiiret. Art- Our 

!*l»efialty. 

The e(|uipment of our manufacturing 
plant and the location of our factory oi. 
the New York Central and Erie Rail- 
road systems fits us better than any 
other plant to fill orders for the large 
beekeeper. The quality of our goods 
has been a standard toward whicli 
others strive. 

Get our prices on your requirements 
delivered if you desire. 

No want too large — no want too small 
for the '-FALCON" factory. 

It K D C A T A I. O G 
IMfstyaiil iiiioii re«nn'st 



W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

WItcre the good hcc-luvcs come from. 

Factory, Falconer, N. Y., or 117 North 

JeflFerson Street, Chicago, 111. 



ResultsCount 



When you buy COMB FOUNDATION 
you look for RESULTS. 

THE DIITMER PROCESS COMB 
FOUNDATION is the right S^^IELL, 
the right TASTE and the right FIRM- 
NESS to give the BEST RESULTS. 

The DITTMER PROCESS COMB 
FOUNDATION is so like the Bees- 
wax the Honey Bees would SHAPE and 
MOULD for themselves, it makes it 
very acceptable to them. This assures 
a FULL CAPACITY HONEY CROP, 
and remember, to you, Mr. Bee Keeper, 
HONEY IS MONEY. 



A Liberal Discount Offered on All Sup- 
plies. Write for Prices. 



Gus. Dittmer Co. 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



"Griggs Saves You Freight." 



TOLEDO 

Is the best point to get goods quick. 
Send us a list of the goods you wish 
and let us quote you our best price. 

2% DISCOUNT 
IN FEBRUARY 

FROM CATALOG PRICES 

HONEY AND BEESWAX wanted 
in exchange for supplies. 

We also handle Butter, Eggs, and 
all kinds of farm produce. Write us 
what you have to sell. 

S. J. Griggs & Co. 

Toledo, O. 

No. 26 Erie St., near Monroe 
'•Griggs, tlie King Bee" 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young basswood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
p'ies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marsiifield, Wis. 



120 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

When You Buy Lewis Beeware 
You Get... 



liKWIS QL'ALITV — Which mtaiis that all Lewis Hives are made out of clear white 
pine, and Lewis sections made out of tine bright basswood. The material in these 
goods is the best obtainable and selected Iiy experts. 

I>E\VIS W'ORKMAIVSHII' — The Lewis factory is equipped witli the latest improved 
machinery constantly watched over by experts. The Lewis head mechanic has 
had thirty-five years of bee supply experience, the sui)erintendent of bee hive de- 
partment twenty-nine years, the superintendent of sections twenty-eight years. 
These and many other skilled men have a hand in all the Lewis goods you buy. 

LiKWIS PACKING — .Ml Lewis lleeware is carefully and accurately packed — a patent 
woven wood and wire package made only by the Lewis Com]iany, is employed largely 
in packing — this makes the package light, com]>act and damage-proof. 

LEWIS SERVICE — Years ago all goods were shipped direct from the factory with 
attending high freight rates and delays during the honey season — now Lewis l!ee- 
ware can be obtained almost at your own door. Over thirty distributing houses 
carrying Lewis P.eeware by the carload are dotted all over the United States and 
foreign countries. Write for the name of the one nearest you. 

G. B. LEWIS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Beeware WATERTOWN, WIS. 



THE SECRET OF 

Success in Bee Keeping 

Is To Keep Your Colony Strong; To Do This You Must Have 

Good Laying Queens 

Which \vc Guarantee at the fol'owing Prices : 

[Golden] [3 Band Italian] [Carniolan] 
Untested — 1 for $L(10, 6 for $5.40, i:2 for i^9.m. 25 for $17.50. 
Tested — 1 for $L5(), 6 for $8.4(K ]2 for $L"').60, 25 for $30.00. 
Nuclei with Untested Queen — 1 Frame $2.50, 2 Frame $3.50, Six 1 Frame 

$L5.f!fl, Si.\ 2 Frame $20.40. 
Nuclei with Tested Queen — 1 Frame $3.00, 2 Frame $4.00, Si.x 1 FVame 

$17.40, Six 2 Frame $2;:. 40. 

The Drones used in our Apiary for Alating purpose are reared from 
the very best selected Queens, which is as necessary as the selecting of a 
good Queen for Queen rearing. 

For good Queens and c|uick service you can not do better than place your 
order with us. We guarantee safe arrival and satisfaction. Directions for 
building up weak Colonies will be mailed to you for 10 cents. 

The above Queens are all reared in separate yards. 

W. J. LITTLEFIELD, 

R. F. D. No. 3 Little Rock, Ark. 



BARGAIN SALE 

■- IN •■ 

BEE SUPPLIES 

DON'T MISS IT 

Take advantage of the Closing Out 
Sale of the Page & Lyon Go's 
Stock of 

OLD RELIABLE 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Send for Catalog and write me just how 
much and what you want, and I will 
quote you NET PRICES. 

J. F. KENKEL, Trustee 

for Page & Lyon Mfg. Co. 
NEW LONDON, WISCONSIN 



Figure This Out For 

^7" IC lf_ You buy Bee -Supplies 

I OUrSCli! NOWgthat you will need 
^^^^^— — — ^^^" in Apri l! you Save Money 
at the rate of 12 per cent on the $. 

Three per cent is the amount of our early order discount on 
cash purchases in January. January to April is just three months 
— '/4 of a year. Now, 3% for 3 months is interest at the rate of 
12% per year — so you see why we urge early orders accompanied 
by cash this month. 

Another reason is that we can serve you better now than 
three months hence. In a few weeks we will be putting up car- 
load shipments for our dealers and distributing centers and every 
effort in our big plant — the largest establishment in the world 
devoted to the manufacture of bee-supplies — will be directed to 
filling rush orders. You will be just as anxious for your goods as 
our other patrons, and will deserve and receive the same attention 
— no matter what the amount of your order may be, but 

WE CAN SERVE YOU BETTER NOW. 

and we want to make it worth your while to place an early order. 
Try this on a part of your list anyway. Saving at the rate of 12% 
per year ought to interest everybody. 

WE MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING IN 
BEE-SUPPLIES. 

Get our 1912 catalog which gives descriptions, illustrations 
and prices on everything from bee-hives to bee-books, from frames 
to comb-foundation. Get this catalog now. 



The A. I. Root Company 

MEDINA, OHIO 



THE CHAS. F. MAY CO., PRINTERS, DETROIT, MICH. 







Published Mont% 




APR. 
1912 

"w yr ^w 

DfTROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLUR PER YEAR 



Friction 
Transmission 




Self 
Starter 



Five Good Models 



There is a Cartercar for every 
need of the practical man and 
his family — four, five and seven- 
passenger Touring Cars, Coupe 
and Roadster. 

In these models are all the 
latest improvements in the au- 
tomobile world, and also the 
Cartercar features which have 
given satisfaction to thousands 
of drivers. 

For business needs, the Car- 
tercar is speedy, always ready 
and always reliable — and for 
pleasure it is luxurious, easy to 
drive, and with plenty of power 
to travel any roadway without 
jolting or tiring the occupants 
of the car. 

The patented Friction Trans- 
mission of the Cartercar pre- 
vents waste of power and is so 
simple and reliable that it is 
recognized as the most efficient 
form of transmission. It gives 



an unlimited number of speeds, 
adapting the car especially to 
country use. 

The Chain-in-oil Drive is ab- 
solutely noiseless, and running 
in a continual oil bath, there is 
practically no wear on the chain. 

Self Starter, Full Floating 
Rear Axle, Three Brakes, and 
many other features just as 
good, combine to make the Car- 
tercar the ideal car for every- 
one to drive. The self-starter 
makes it very easy for ladies to 
operate. 

The man who drives a Carter- 
car has more time for business 
— both he and his family get 
more enjoyment out of life — 
and he finds that his car is one 
of the best investments he ever 
made. 

Let us send you complete in- 
formation. 



Cartercar Company 



PONTIAC, MICHIGAN. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 121 



Are You Ready? 



The season is advancing; the long cold winter is about over. Bees will be breeding 
up soon for the early honey llow, and supjilies should be on hand ready for instant ser- 
vice when the time comes. 

We have a large and complete slock of Root's goods, and cars are coming in regu- 
larly. There is nothing in the line we can't furnish promptly, and we can save you time 
and money. 

Our new catalog is ready for you. Get your supplies from us at factory prices and 
save on transportation charges. 

We can reach any point in this locality very promptly, and can get the goods started 
to you the day your order is received. 

Yovi know that you can't get better goods than Root's, and we want the chance to 
?how you that our service is worthy of your consideration. Let us know your needs and 
we will do the rest. 



C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 

2 1 46 Central Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 



Aspinwall Non-Swarming Bee Hive 



A Practical Success after 22 years of Experimentation. An- 
other season has added to its success. 

Evenly filled sections of Honey Produced without separators. 

Will Double the Yield of Comb Honey. 

Every Bee-Keeper should satisfy himself as to OUr claim 

by ordering at least one sample Hive and testing. 

Descriptive circulars with prices mailed free. 
A • 11 T\/r£ r^ 601 SABIN STREET 

Aspinwall IVlrg.v^O., jackson,michigan,usa 

Canadian Factory: Guelph, Ontario 
World's Oldest and Largest Makers of Potato Machinery. 

CUTTERS :: PLANTERS :: SPRAYERS :: DIGGERS :: SORTERS 



122 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



IF BEES COULD TALK 



They Would Say : 

"GIVE US 



*Dadant's Foundation' 



ITS CLEAN, ITS PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES " 



If you are not using "DADANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DADANT & SON S, 1^%'.^^.^: 
A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 

fJXXXJTJ 



BINGHAM SMOKERS 

Insist on Old Reliable Bingham Bee Smokers; for sale by all 
dealers in bee-keepers' supplies. For over 30 years the standard 
in all countries. The smoker with a valve in the bellows, 
direct draft, bent cap, inverted bellows and soot-burning device. 

Smoke Engine, 4-inch each $1.25; mail, $1.50 




Doctor, 3^-inch each .85; mail, 

Conquerer, 3-inch each .75 ; mail, 

Little Wonder, 2-inch each .50; mail. 

Honey Knife each .70; mail, 

Itlanitfactured only by 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

Grautl Raniil.s. Mioli. 



1.10 

1.00 

.65 

.80 



Protection Hive 

The best and lowest price hive on the market. This 
hive has yi material in the outer wall, and is not 
cheaply made of H material like some other hives on 
the market. Send for circular showing 12 large illus- 
trations. It will pay you to investigate. 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 




THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



123 



National Bee -Keepers' 
Association 

OBJECTS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



The objects of this Association shall be to 
aid its members in the business of bee-keeping; 
to help in the sale of their honey and beeswax, 
and to promote the interests of bee-keepers in 
any other direction decided upon by the Board 
of Directors. 



OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

President — Geo. W. York, Chicago, 111. 
\'ice-Pres. — Morley Pettit, Guelph, Ont. 
Secretary — E. B. Tyrrell, Dotroit, Mich. 
Treas.-Clen'l Mgr. — N. E. France, Piattsville, 
Wis. 

DIRECTORS. 

I". D. Townsend. Remus, Mich, 
Wesley I'oster, Boulder. Colo. 
1". Wilcox, Mauston, Wis. 
.1. K. Crane, iMiddlebury. Vt. 
.1. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn, 



Annual Membership $1.50, one-third, or 50 
cents of which goes to the local branch where 
such branch is organized. Send dues to the 
Secretary. 



%Potatoe 



"'^ mi 



•Izer's Potntoes are known tb** 
world over for extreme earliuess. 

Theeditor of the Rural Niw Yorker fMi 
gives to Salzer'g Burliest Pmrito the a: 
I touishing yield of 464 bushels per acrel 

r Salzer's Earliest Potato Collection. 

Composed of four rare earliest and ' 
Mater sort, separately packed, full Aveight, 
bbl. ouly $4.00. Catalog tells! ' 

For 16 Cents. 

, lO.OOOkernclsofsplendid Lettuce, Radish,/ 
(Tomato. Cabbage, Turuip, Onion, Celery, I 
' y, Carrot, Melon and Flower Seeds 
iug bushels of vegetables and 
flowers for lOc postpaid. 
Big vegetable and farm seed cata- 
; free fur the asking. 



>JohnA.SalzerSeedCo.,i, - 
213 6o. 8tli St., La Crosse, WjB.V't 



iJ^Jili 



ilV',*^' 



W. H. Laws 

will be ready to take care of your queen 
orders, whether large or small, the coming 
season. Twenty-five years of careful breed- 
ing brings Laws' queens above the usual 
standard; better let us book your orders 
now. 

Tested queens in March; untested, after 
April 1st. About 50 first-class breeding- 
queens ready at any date. 

Prices: Tested, $1.25; 5 for $5.00; Breed- 
ers, each $5.00. Address 

W. H. Laws, Beeville, Texas. 



SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufacturing Sedions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 
CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 




At Last — ^A Comfortable Motorcyde 

The Ful-Floteing seat on the new 
Harley-Uavidson Motortscle eliminates 
jolts, jars and all vibrations. The Free- 
wheel Control, another exclusive fea- 
I tare makes it possible to start the 
Harley-Davidson like an aatomobile, 
witiiout pedaling or running alongside 
I to start motor. Write for catalog. 

H«Tfcy-D«Tidiwi Motor Co.. 344 A St.. Mihraakee 



G E IN U I X E CARMOJ>A.\ AI.P! E 
<iUEEIVS. My breeders were imported direct 
from Carniola, Austria. They are very hardy, 
large and gentle, great hustlers, and white cap- 
pei-s. I also have fine Italians and Banats bred 
in separate yards, 75 cents each, $8 Doz. Cir- 
cular free. GRANT ANDERSON, San 
Beitito, Texas. 



American Butter & Cheese CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

Co. 488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 

31-33 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. in 

Honey, Bees-«ax, 3Iaple Sugar and 

Always in the market for choice Syrup, Etc. 

comb honey. Write us. i Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 



124 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



The Fruit Belt of Michigan 

Offers Wonderful Opportunities to Bee Men, Orchard- 
men and Farmers. 

Land values are at present very low — $15 per acre upwards — people are 
just waking up to the possibilities in this favored section. Some have already 
begun to cash in and others are coming along in a remarkable way. Land 
values will increase rapidly as the basic values are here — Soil, Climate, Prox- 
imity to Markets. 

Let us tell you what we can do for 3'ou. Write us frankly today as to 
your ideas. a\ailable means, etc. 

Mr. Tyrrell will vouch for us. 

FRUIT BELT LAND CORPORATION, 

52 Greenbush St., Manistee, Mich. 



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THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



125 



Why Not REAR Your Own QUEENS? 



Doolittle's "Scientific Queen-Rearing" and the 
American Bee Journal for 1912 — Both for Only 



$1.00 



D 



Every Bee-keeper Slioiild Have Both Book and 
Bee-Paper. 

OOLITTLE'S "Scientific Queen-Rearing" booli 
jntains 126 pages, and is bound in leatherette 
witli round corners. It tells in the clearest 
way possible just how the famous queen-breeder, 
Mr. G. JI. Doolittle. rears the best of queen-bees 
in perfect accord with Nature's way. It is for 
both amateur and veteran in bee-keeping. As all 
know, Mr. Doolittle has spent some 40 years in 
rearing queens and producing honey. He has no 
superior as a queen-breeder. You can learn to rear 
fine queens by following his directions. Read up 
now before the bee season is here. 

You will not regret having this book, which also 
gives his inanagement of the bees for the produc- 
tion of honey. 

The book, and the American Bee Journal for 
1912, for only $1.00, is certainly a big bargain for 
you. Send the $1.00 now, and we will begin your 
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this book. Sample copy of the Bee Journal free. 
Address 

GEORGE W. YORK & CO., 117 No. Jefferson St., Chica 





go, III. 



^ip n eyoi 



esjLLYe 



ri 



Ger?n^ 2?2 ike h'orjdo 

:5» ^ 






TV 



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Hii 






i^ 



Jim€ 2^ncLji£inpe/-RtiLre ^enf^W^S' Cents'. 
G-lf-D ci^ ton^Inven tor, Cf^ ats v^orffiMah 

Honey and water only is required. No additional acid, flavoring or coloring 
matter of any kind whatsoever. Aquasun is made of any sharpness that is de- 
sired. It pleases every palate and invigorates every system and the refreshing 
eflfect lingers two to four hours afterward. Aquasun contains no alcohol or 
other intoxicant. It is just crisp, crackling, lively fruit acid intermingled with a 
taste of sweetness that produces a flavor that is perfectly delightful. 

Aquasun cools us in summer and warms us in winter by instantly dispersing 
acid (oxygen) and oil (carbon) to the parts where these elements have become 
lacking. The elements of Aquasun are strong in solar iron which enriches the 
blood and changes water to hydrogen, the all powerful disease fighter of this 
planet. Asquasun is not a mold or a ferment ; neither brewed nor doctored. Its 
elements are selected and proportioned according to nature's law by the plants 
which yield honey. 

C. W. DAYTON, 

(PATENT AI.I.OWKU) Chatsworth, California. 



126 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 




A MONTHLY JOURNAL 



DEVOTEDTOTHE INTERESTS OF HONEY PRODUCERS 

^LnnAlrar 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editorand Publisher 
Office OF Pu BLiCATiON - - - 230 Woodlan d Aven u e 

VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, APRIL 1, 1912. No. 4. 



A Discussion of Those Picture Grading Rules 

BY THE SUBSCRIBERS. 

V^^HAT I expected has iDeen realized. There is no uniform 
VJt^ interpretation of even the grading- rules we have had. A 
man could send his Xo. 1 honey to one market according to 
his grading, and ha\-e it accepted for fancy, while in another it would 
not pass for even Xo. 1. Every buyer and producer seems to have a 
set of rules all his own, and selling on grading rules, such as we 
have had, has been in a measure a farce. 

Those pictures at the head of my honey quotations have started 
something. Let us hope they will keep it going until we at least 
have some semblance to a uniform grading. It is absolutely neces- 
'sary before a Xational market can be established. 

Both producers and buyers disagree regarding those pictures. 
Some say they are all right, while others condemn. I have refer- 
ence to their correct representation of the grades named. One 
thing, however, which I notice, is that most have taken them to 
mean the average for each grade, instead of the poorest. Remember 
that honey graded according to those pictures would show up a 
great deal better than the pictures designate. Shall I put an aver- 
age section there instead of the poorest? 

To get the matter started I sent the following questions to 
those who quote honey markets in the Review. 

1. If you received a shipment of honey with no sections poorer 
than the one shown in the Rextew as fancy, would you accept it as 
a shipment of fancy honey? If not. whv?" 



128 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

2. If you received a shipment of honey with no sections poorer 
than the one shown in the Rkvikw as Xo. 1, would you accept it as 
a shipment of No. 1 honey? If not, why? 

3. If you received a shipment of honey with no sections poorer 
than the one shown in the Review as Xo. •;!, w<:iukl yoiv accept it as 
a shipment of No. 2 honey. If not, why? 

4. What ol)jection is there to using pictures to designate the 
grades? 

The replies which follow will show the producer what he has 
been up against in regard to selling his honey. You will be better 
able to know the real need for a more uniform grading standard, 
and just why I am anxious to thresh this matter out imtil there is 
no such variation in opinions both among the producers and buyers, 
for you will get some producers' opinions before this is finished. I 
feel that this is of enough importance so that it should be given 
plenty of time to be discussed. 

lilake-Lee Co., Koston, Mass.. replied "yes" to each of the three 
questions, and in reply to the fourth, said "None except color." 

R. A. Burnett & Co., Chicago, 111., say: "Replying to your 
question X^o. 1, would say: If we received a shipment billed as 
fanc_y honey with sections in it such as the one in question, we 
should reject it, for the reason that there should l)e no imperfections 
in fancy honey; however, it would pass in Xo. 1 h(jncy as about the 
poorest section permissible therein. Hence, in our notion of how 
honey should be graded, you should shove out Xo. 2 as luimer- 
chantable fc^r the three grades you desire, and insert over the cap- 
tion "fancy" more nearly perfect sections and place the present one 
in No. 1 grade, and the Xo. 1 in Xo. 2. \A'e do not know of any 
objection to using pictures to designate the grade." 

Rather a different reply than the one first quoted, isn't it? Here 
is another different idea regarding grading, where a fancy grade is 
condemned. Good arguments, too. Presented by C. C. Clemons- 
Produce Co., of Kansas City, yio.: 

"In reply to your favor of the 2oth inst., in regard to the grad- 
ing of comb honey, will say: In the first place we are not in favor 
of making a fancy grade of comb honey ; for one reason the word 
'fancy' means a whole lot; another reason the opportunities are too 
great for rejecting a car if the market was not just right, and still 
another reason is that after making a fancy grade you have left 
only an ordinary grade of No. 1 and a very poor grade of X'o. 2. 

"In regard to your first picture, according to Colorado grading 
rules, it would grade No. 1 ; the second picture is not any too good 
for Xo. 1 grade, and the third not a very good No. 2, and a carload 
all like that would hardly pass for No. 2 ; it would make a better No. 
3 ; the main reason, hardlv half of the comb adheres to the section. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 129 

"Don't believe selling;- honey by pictures would prove a satis- 
factory plan." 

Still another view is s^iven in the reply of Ilildreth & Segelken, 
of Xew York Cit}-. in the following: 

"It is not alone the color of the honey which should be taken 
into consideration, but the weight of the section as well. A crate 
of honey holding say 24 combs fancy, should average 23 pounds net ; 
Xo. 1 from 21 to 22 pounds, and Xo. 2 not less than from 19 to 20 
pounds. 

"Xow\ as to the comb you have marked fancy, we would be 
only too glad to receive all combs as good as the one shown in the 
picture. If no poorer filled combs than the one shown would pass 
as fancy honey, there would not be much of that grade on the mar- 
kets. A good manv sections Avhich would range Ijetween your 
fancy and your Xo. 1 could be classed as fancy, and we do not 
think that anv dealer or buyer would take exception, so long as the 
color is fancy white. 

"Your comb marked Xo. 1, is all right, but your comb marked 
Xo. 2 is rather too scanty. From the appearance we should judge 
that a crate holding- 24 sections like the one shown, would not 
weigh more than lo or 1(5 pounds. Some of these combs may be 
put into the Xo. 2 honey in order to make the w^eight as above 
stated, say 19 to 20 pounds, and all combs like this would not pass 
as Xo. 2 honey. The grading question is a rather hard proposition, 
and we doubt very much whether any rules could be adopted to suit 
everyone." 

{Coiitiiiiicd ill May Ri-:\ikw. ) 



High Aim in Comb Honey Production. 

FRED. W. MUTH. 

^^A liRE I to raise Comb Honey to ship, it would be only Fancy 
Vtf/ and Xumber 1 grades, using Xo. 1 white polished 4^4 x 4'4 
xljs 2-beeway sections. By all means use separators, and 
just as important, to insure safe transportation, 1 would positively 
use top and bottom starters in each section, just as they do in the 
west where they ship carloads of Comb Honey thousands of miles 
without breaking a comb. 

Having scraped off all the propolis, the Fancy should l)e packed 
separate from the X'o. 1 grade. I would use a 24-section, glass front, 
double-tier wooden case, with top stenciled "This side up. handle 
with care." Grade carefully so that each case wall weigh as near 
22^ lbs. net as possible. 



130 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

For shipping, the cases should be packed in a carrier with 
handles on both sides extending about 5 inches beyond the ends 
of the carrier, with three inches of straw on the bottom. Then lay 
newspaper on the sides and top of the cases, always placing the 
glass toward the inside of the carrier so that the truckmen are not 
tempted to break the glass with their feet. 

Comb Honey raised and shipped to the market like the above 
not only gladdens your heart, but stamps you as a practical bee- 
keeper and rewards you with the best price the market can afford, 
and elevates the profession of bee-keeping. 

Three cheers for the few Comb Honey producers who have the 
consumers' interest at heart, and a rousing tiger for those great 
western producers who have the distinguished honor to lead the 
way and develop the market to the high state of perfection it is 
today. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

[Now that I have pulled off my coat to get a more standard 
set of grading rules, it gives me great pleasure to give space to the 
above from so extensive a buyer of honey as Mr. Muth. This ques- 
tion is of the utmost importance, for with three or four sets of 
grading rules, with their various interpretations, we will never get 
that uniform article so necessary to obtain the best price.] 



The Best Method of Introducing a Queen in the 
Shortest Possible Time. 

WESLEY FOSTER 

>^ /HAVING practiced the tobacco method, the caging of the queen 

jl*l for a day or so before releasing her; and the sugar candy 

method letting the bees gnaw out the queen; I have found 

the following method as little subject to risk and the quickest 

method that I have tried. 

Going to the hive I wish to requeen I find the old queen and kill 
her, then take two of the combs with the most young bees and 
hatching bees on them, putting them at one side of the hive with 
the division board between them and the main cluster of bees. If 
there are no old bees on these combs to speak of, I then run the 
new queen right in on these combs of hatching bees. 

So far I have not lost one in twenty of the queens, and in 
forty-eight hours I come around and remove the division board, 
readjusting the brood nest as I wish it to be. ]\Iany a hive I just 
pull out a comb of bees and brood after disposing of the old queen 
and turn my new queen loose on the comb before my eyes. If the 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 131 

bees are quiet and the queen not nervous everything will be alright, 
but should anything- unusual appear in the bees' manner toward 
the queen I resort to the isolation of the queen on the combs of 
hatching brood. 

I have never had good success in leaving the queen caged on 
the hive, for so often she is balled or rather she and her cage is, 
and when this happens it is hard to get the bees to accept her. 
One will be able to judge pretty well whether the bees will accept 
the queen by their docility and the bearing of the queen. A queen 
that has been handled carefully will walk out of the cage onto the 
comb among the bees as sedately and confidently as though she 
had always belonged there. I watch a few minutes and if every- 
thing is quiet close the hive and go away. 

Boulder. Col. 



A Texas Bee-Keeper, With An Apiary in Oklahoma, 
Gives Some Good Advice About Organizations. 

(Read at Oklahoma Meeting.) 

GEO. H. COULSON. 

^^^^R. President: — You have selected for me the sul:)ject of the 
^/,£ association of bee-keepers. I am sorry you did this, as upon 
that subject it might be said that I am an extremist, approx- 
imating almost to fanaticism, and I fear before I get through you 
will regard my ideas as extravagant as that of the Irishman who, 
upon visiting his native country, was asked if it was true that the 
people in America built houses one on top of another, instead of 
side by side, and called them "skyscrapers." Pat replied that it was, 
and that on the last one he worked on in Xew York they had to 
"jukc down to alloii' tJie moon to pass over, and that America was an 
easy place to live in, that all he had to do was to carry brick and mor- 
tar to the top of the house, and there were men up there who did 
all the work. 

AX( AGE OF ASSOCIATIONS. 

This might be said to be the age of association. In this day 
every enterprise or avocation, to be succcssfnlly condncted. must 
have its association. We have the corn grozcers' association, the 
cotton growers' association, and the cattle, sheep, szcine and poultry 
dealers all have their associations, and there are subdivisions of 
these such as Short-honis, Jersey, and so on. for cattle; Poland China 
and Berkshires for hogs, in breeds and strains almost innumerable, 
each having their admirers^ and their meetings, which sometimes 
extend for days, at which the valuable points of these breeds are 



132 THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 

discussed. The idea of tlie bee-keej^ers succeedint^- in their chosen 
occupation zi'ithont an association, seems iifterly absurd to me; and if 
we fail to give our occupation the time and attention i^iven to other 
industries of far less importance, it is soon noticed by an ever scru- 
tinizing public. Then, to succeed, we must follow suit. The ad- 
vantages to be derived from these associations are manyfold. The 
frequent coming together of men whose thoughts are running in the 
same channel, and a comparison of these thoughts, brought out 
by friendly discussions, enable a member to take advantage of all 
new discoveries made by the brightest members in the special call- 
ing, making it exceedingly difficult for the man who attempts to 
pursue the same occupation with but one brain, as it might be 
termed, and imless he is in the possession of a giant intellect will 
only be able to succeed fairly well. 

THE FIEI.B IN OKI.AHOMA. 

With over fi\e hundred l)ee-keepers in ( )klaht)ma and lots of 
honey going to waste in nearly e\ery county in the state, no grander 
field could exist for an association of our chosen calling if we but 
take hold and each do his part. It pains me to see some Oklahoma 
bee-keepers standing aloof from the National .\ssociation and crit- 
icising its action. It is our duty to coincide with that body and 
work in harmony with it; in fact, become a part of it, and if the 
new constitution does not suit us, put ourselves in a position to 
help change it until it does. With over four thousand members in 
the National organization, having representatives from forty-five 
states, we have the grandest foundation laid for one of the most 
elTective associations, or corporations if you please to call it. that 
ever existed, ^^'e have it in our power to sa\' what shall constitute 
the price of well ripened honey in every market in the United 
.States, if not in the world. Now do not throw up your hands in 
holy horror and shout, "trust, graft," or anything of the kind. Am- 
erican bee-keepers are not composed of that kind of material that 
oppressive trusts are made of, as this will l)e a trust that can be 
trusted. One of its ])rincipal objects will be to increase the quantity 
of that which is now wasted, and bring about a general use of that 
which is but little used among the masses of the people, and thus 
prove conducive to the general health of all. At the present time 
not one in five hundred of the inhabitants of the nation has ever 
tasted of that God-given sweet, hidden in the flowers of every state, 
county and township, and only to be secured through the medium 
of the busy bee. \\'ith butter selling in most of oui country mar- 
kets at from ?0c to ."iOc per pound, much of it stronger than the 
strongest argument we have heretofore made, we have honey, (na- 
ture's pre-digested sweet) to take its place at from He to 10c per 
pound. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 133 

I niij^ht state that another reason why the Xational Association 
will never be a trust that will ofiprcss the pecjple as other trusts 
have done, is the fact that the class of men who are enf;aged today 
in the production and sale of honey are not of that class who are 
living- for self alone. They have higher notions than that of extor- 
tion. A\'hat a rare thing is it to hear of a professional bee-keeper 
applying; for a patent to protect him in his discoveries or inventions, 
in his line of work, with the view of making' money out of it. He 
seems to have liii:^her motixes than that of extortion or the taking- 
of nsnry, but rather prefers to adopt the scriptural admonition that 
"freely thou hast received, freely give.'' there being something- in 
the association with bees and their work in securing honey from 
nature's flowers, that induces him t(^ act honestl}'. 

MORE TIMZ: AT MEETINGS NEEDED. 

It appears to me that we do not give ourselves the time at oiu" 
meetings that the importance of our calling- demands, instead of a 
feiv honrs for discussion at which time the election of officers and 
routine business is crowded in. wc should at least take oitc entire day, 
or a day and night for our discussions. I recently attended a 
poultrv association, exhibited chickens, etc.. and four entire days 
were consumed, including the evenings until ]ii o'clock. Wliich is 
the most important, bees or biddy f 

Xow in conclusion, brother bee-keepers, should foul-brood get 
in your apiary or a bad season occur as in Oklahoma and in many 
other states the ])ast year, do not get diseourai:;ed and ne(:;lect yonr 
bees. Rememl^er that 

This world is not as bad a world 

As some would like to make it ; 
Though whether g-ood or whether bad 
Depends u]ion how we take it. 
A'ictoria. Texas. 



Comments on Articles in February Revie'w. 

J. L. BYER. 

' " jf^ 1\ I E X D TYRRELL: February Rkx'ikvn- came to hand a few 
Jl\ days ago. and 1 feel prompted to make a few comiuents on some 
of the articles contained in the same. First. I notice the name 
of Ht)mer Alathewson, and that reminds me that he was one of the 
chaps that helped to make my visit to Albany in the fall of '10, an 
occasion always to be remembered with pleasure. Mr. Alathewson 
lives not so very far from the home of our departed friend, Afr. 
Alexander, and he certainly is a real disciple of the latter insofar 
as s])ring feeding is concerned. Speaking of the Alexander feeder. 



134 THE BEE-KEEPERS REVIEW 

and the plan of using the same in the early spring, he says, ''Feed 
a little each day until fruit bloom, and between fruit bloom and 
clover you will get a crop. No feed and the crop will not bother 
you." Certainly that is clear-cut and concise enough for anyone. 

While it is generelly accepted as a fact that the Review is mainly 
for specialists in beekeeping, yet I think it is a pretty good journal 
for beginners, too, and like as not a number of this class are on 
the subscription list of the paper. On account of this class. I am 
prompted to come to their rescue, and say that it is quite possible 
to get a crop in most localities I am familiar with, without going to 
all the trouble and expense of feeding colonies from the time they 
are set out till fruit bloom — after that date ( fruit bloom) feeding 
is pretty good practice in most cases, but not ahi'ays necessary to 
secure a crop — circumstances as to season and locality being the 
deciding factors in the matter as to feed or not to feed. ^lore than 
that, there are a number of us so foolish as to believe that ca'iy 
spring feeding is actually detrimental to the bees, and we would not 
let anyone do the work if they supplied the sugar free and work 
ditto. 

Without going into detail on this question, a few questions as 
to why it should l)e necessary to feed colonies in the early spring 
may not be out of order. Given a good, prolific queen in the hive, 
abundance of good stores, and the colony having wintered in good 
condition, what can stimulating by feeding do, to better the condi- 
tion of said colony during the latter part of March, and all of April, 
owing to the very uncertain weather, changing from cold to warm 
and vice versa — this kind of weather often continuing during first 
week of May? Is it not the general experience that colonies at that 
time do not suffer for want of brood, but rather from want of bees 
to take care of the brood there may be in the hives? Certainly that 
has been my experience with the bees 1 have, and it has never been 
any trouble to get enough brood in the hives in the early spring 
when we have so much bad weather as a rule. Of course, I admit 
that the feeding will sometimes stimulate the queen to lay more 
eggs than she would if no feed was given, but when a cold snap 
came and all the extended circles of the brood caused by this feeding 
would perish, where was the gain? 

We hear much of spring dwindling, and I would like to ask if 
any bee-keeper ever found a colony going back in the early spring 
because the queen was not laving enough. What is the actual con- 
dition found in a colony that is rapidly fading away by this com- 
plaint? Instead of the queen not laying fast enough, it is always 
found that there are not bees enough to care for what eggs the 
queen does lay, and when they finally dwindle out altogether, it is 
found that the queen to the last has been laying eggs, seemingly 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 135 

with the desperate hope that she can in this way perpetuate the 
life of the colony. 

While I honestly believe that the best ''spring" treatment for a 
colony of bees is to have an abundance of good stores given in the 
fall before, and that early spring manipulation almost in any form, 
is not to the best interests of the colony, yet I am not so foolish 
as to try to persuade friend [Nlathewson and other believers of early 
spring feeding to stop their practice which seems to give good re- 
sults in their hands. However, as stated before, these comments 
on the system advocated by friend Mathewson are for the benefit 
of some who may contemplate entering the business and who may 
be discouraged by the picture of barrels of sugar looming up in the 
horizon whenever they think of bee-keeping. Sugar may be neces- 
sary sometimes in the fall for winter stores, but deliver this chap 
from the necessity of feeding any l^efore fruit bloom in the spring. 

PAINTING FOUNDATION WITH WAX. 

O. O. Poppleton is exceedingly good authority, but although 
interested in his plan of painting the tops of the sheets of founda- 
tion to prevent sagging, I am not at all enamoured with the idea, as 
it appears to me it would take a lot of wax and a lot of work to 
practice the plan on an extensive scale. With vertical wiring I 
have found that the trouble is pretty well done away with, and 
although many of my frames are wired horizontally. I unhesitatingly 
assert that the best method is the vertical. It will not likely ever 
be a popular method, as it is more trouble to pierce the top-bars 
than the ends — this may explain why the vertical plan has not more 
advocates. Perhaps another objection is that the ordinary bottom 
bars will spring badly when the wires are strung from top to bottom. 

CIiOVER BI.COMING FIBST VEAB. 

White clover and alsike are. in "our locality." biennials. In 
other words the plants that came up in '11 will bloom, go to seed 
and then die in '12. This may not always be true, but it is the 
general rule, as can be proven by all who cultivate the two plants 
for seed. In the past we have raised hundreds of acres ot both 
kinds of clover, and the seed crop is always taken the second year 
after being sown. Sometimes the alsike will bloom in August the 
first year sown, to a limited extent, if the season has been a moist 
one. In such cases, while the bees would be seen on the blossoms, 
yet no honey of any account would be brought in. 

BEE ESCAPES. 

Have never used bee escape boards to any extent, and as we are 
thinking of getting a number to use at the apiary 200 miles away 
from home, next season, I read with interest what Friend Getaz has 



136 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

to sa}' on the question. To tell the truth [ am a bit disappointed 
with the "concerns" after seeing- what a lot of trouble he has to 
make them work successfully. Had an itlea that all that was neces- 
sary was to go the night before and put on -U) or .30 as the case 
might be, and in the morning- j)ile all the supers on a barrow and 
trot them into the honev house. Has anyone else had better luck 
than yir. tletaz in the use of these bee-escape l)oards. I wonder. 
Any information on that line will be thankfully received, 
Alt. fov. ( )nt.. Can. 



Shall We Buy or Rear Our Queens? 

J. A. CRANE. 

•rfj^ EAR EDITOR: Among the many subjects which engage 
JZI/ the attention of up-to-date beekeepers, none is more per- 
sistent, nor perliaps more vital than the question of queens; 
whether to raise, or 1)U}' what are needed. 

When I l^egan bee keeping, and began tc^ read !)ee papers and 
especially the glowing ads. of queen breeders, I thought that my 
poor black bees, which gave me one year 141 pounds per colony, 
were of necessity about the poorest bees in America, and I. of course, 
looked forward to the time when I should have all Italians, and 
such light yields be a thing- of the past. Alas, 1 ha\c the yellow 
bees all right, and I think I ha\e some of the best >^trains, but never 
quite reached the average that I did with the old blacks, but have 
often had individual colonies do much better than any colony of 
blacks that I ever owned. 

But this is neither here nor there. The point is, Iktw shall we 
get queens for our own use. Some extensive bee-keepers say that 
they must buy as they have no time to raise their own. That is 
all right. I always concede that every man knows his own busi- 
ness better than 1 do. but in the long run how much better ofT is 
he by buying largel}". than if he left the matter entirely with the 
bees themselves, since at least one writer says that he always ex- 
pects that at least ten per cent of his purchased queens will prove 
worthless? How many more than that would he worthless if the 
matter was left entirely to the bees? 

RAISING QUEEN CEI^IiS BY THE FECK. 

Several vears ago someone spoke of the ease with which queen 
cells could be raised by the peck or hundred, at almost any time oi 
year when bees were Hying. I have paid a lot of good dollars for 
queens raised by the peck and ha\e come to the conclusion that they 
do not work well in mv ward. I must adniit that I ha\e once in a 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 137 

while found an extra good queen among purchased stock, but with 
me they have been merely the exceptions which prove the rule, and 
I at present buy very few. 

I have also tried many ways of raising queens, even went so far 
as to prepare for raising queens for sale at one time, but what to 
do with the poor queens "sort o' bothered me," and I never went 
any farther with it, and broke up most of my fixtures. I now never 
sell a queen unless some one comes to my yard and picks out what 
he wants himself. 

Of the many methods of raising queens, I like this best for a 
busy man during a busy time: I first put an empty comb into my 
breeding hive. Three days later I prepare- cells as follows: Take 
out the comb with the eggs ready to hatch, and cut out strips one 
row of cells wide, then cut through every other cell, and stick them 
on or in the cell cups. Place in the cell bars and give to the bees 
prepared for cell starting. I sometimes shake bees into a swarm box 
and shut them in for six hours, according to the plan given by Dr. 
Phillips in his bulletin, but more often I do it in this way: Go to a 
strong colony and remove the super from over an excluder about 
night. Set it away until the next morning with the swarm box 
cover over it, prepare the cells as above and give to the bees. The 
eggs should hatch during the day, and at night take the super back 
to the hive from which it was taken, raise two frames of brood from 
below^ and place the cell bars between them, over the excluder of 
course. 

CARING FOR THE CEI.I.S. 

Now right here is where it seems to me that many of us have 
often made a serious mistake. W'e know that a strong force of queen- 
less bees will start a large batch of celh, and a strong colony will 
build out after a fashion about all that are started, but how many 
will be good for anything. I want a queen that I am going to use 
in my yard to hatch out from a large fine cell, and I want to find a 
good sized wad of royal jelly left in the bottom of it when she 
comes out. The question is how to bring this about. Simply take 
away all but from six to eight of the well started cells and place 
them in other hives under the same conditions, and do this over the 
next da}- after placing them on the original hive. Then look them 
over before giving to nuclei or colonies to hatch, and reject all cells 
not up to the standard in size and shape, and we may reasonably 
expect very few "five-cent" queens as a result. 

Xow while this may seem to be a lot of fussing for nothing the 
extra quality of all queens obtained, and the comparatively few poor 
ones to be replaced later seem to me to be good pay for the extra 
time and trouble. 



138 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

In this wa\- the queen is practically raised from the egg, being- 
hatched with queenless bees who are anxious for a queen, and who 
will start cells around the eggs before they are hatched, and then 
they are returned to a strong colony about as soon as they are' 
hatched, so it seems to me that they have about the best chance to 
make good that it would be ])ossible to give them. 

GRAFTING NOT NECESSARV. 

I have grafted man\- hundred cells with success, but it always 
seemed as if it might hurt the baby larvce to handle it, and change it 
from its original warm cradle to another which might not be quite 
so warm, or the food might be a little different, or any one of a 
dozen other chances might do it some harm. Hy this method there 
is no handling", transferring or anything of the kind, and with me 
results have been fine queens. I generally re-queen by the ripe cell 
method, which is very sure and takes little time. It would seem 
that nearly any one who needed from fifty to one hundred queens 
in 3. season could by this method raise what queens he needed, for 
less than half of the money he would have to pay for untested 
stock, with the chances in his favor for better stock. 
Marion, X. Y. 



Improving Your Bees While Producing Honey. 

GEO. B. HOWE. 

(Continued from March number.) 

HABS TO BRZ:Z:i> ITAI.IANS TRUE TO COI.OR. 

You who have bred the Italian bee know how hard it is to g'et 
them to breed pure as to color. It is "select'' or they will degener- 
ate l)ack to the Black bee only too quickly. I am sure that if you 
take one colony of Black bees, put it into an apiary of pure Italians, 
and let them alone, in a few years they will degenerate back to the 
lUack bee with all their characteristics. 

It is not that the Black bee is the strongest, but the strong 
tendency to drift to Black. I wish to make this ijlain. Take a 
tiock of Plymouth Rock hens and roosters. Now i)Ut a brown Leg- 
horn rooster with them and see how quickly the Leghorn blood will 
run out the Plymouth Rock blood. The same with black bee. The 
drones are more active and the tendency to revert back to black 
blood. Also the Black bees rear more drones tlian the Italian bees 
do. So you can see that there is just truth enough in that theory 
to be misleading. The color of the Black ]:)ee is all in her favor in 
regard to their being able to stand more cold then the real yellow 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



139 




Oh, Yes, They Have Snow in Missouri. J. F. Diemer's Yard, Libeity, Mo. 

bee. So I found here was one place where the l)nrk Leather 
Italian strains were ahead of the lighter colored bees. 



SEIiECTINO OUR BREEDING STOCK. 

There is one sure way of doin^- this — to go ])y the honey record. 
lUit there are thins^^s ci'cii more iiiipo'-faiil. I'irst, the colony must 
winter perfect, and. if they don't, they are not fit to l)reed from. 
When do we know that they winter perfect? Let me explain. I 
do not consider that a colony has wintered perfect unless they have 
been free from dysentery, sjjrini;- dwindlini^", paralysis or anythins;' 
that shows a Zi'cakiicss. \'()U will all ha\e to admit that there are 
some colonies tliat winter perfect when about every other colony 
seemingly has dwindled or shows signs of dysenterw Honey dew 
is bad stores to winter bees on. as we should all know, and yet 
why is it some colonies will winter perfect, as you might say. on^ the 
7'cry same stores that ruined the other colonies. Xot only that, but 
they build up in Ijad weather in spring, while the others are stand- 
ing still or going back. I admit the Avinter stores have much to do 
with it l)Ut. on the other hand, I tind it is in the bee as well. 

Xow when they commence to l)rced up in the spring, see' if the 
(jueen lays in ever)- cell, keeping her l^roodnest compact and as 
warm weather comes on she fills those combs solid with brood clear 
to the end bar and from top to bottom as well, not laving in si.x 
or seven combs what should be in four. I use regular G frames. 



140 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Here is a characteristic that must not be overlooked. You will 
never find that colony where the cjueen scatters her brood up with 
the leaders in the fall. She must fill her combs solid with brood 
and be prolific enough to keep them so. Such colonies are less 
inclined to swarm, contrary to theory. We find that colony at work 
early in the morning and late at night, and if there is nectar in the 
field they are not hanging around you every time you open a hive. 
Oh, no, they are so busy they don't seemingly Jiazr time to think of 
robbing. 

STBONO, VIGOROUS FI.VERS. 

Now note these bees as they leave the hive. They are away 
like a flash and when they return they enter the hive so quickly 
that you can not catch a field bee unless it is cool or windy. I wish 
to be understood that I am talking about field bees, for young bees 
will always mark their location. They will work in cool weather 
or when it rains. Throw sawdust at the entrance and see how 
quickly those bees will carry it away, while some colonies seem 
indifferent to it. This shows vigor and vigor in the right direction 
is what we have got to have for good results in honey production. 

Again, note the wings of your bees. You will soon learn that 
there is quite a noticeable variation in different colonies. 

I would like to call 3'our attention to the load of honey, that is, 
the size of their honey sacks. Catch the bees in a honey flow, kill 
the bee, dissect her and you will find some strains of Italians carry 
one-third more honey to a load than some black colonies do. You 
can compare the size of the honey sacks and prove whether or not 
I am right. Then note if the colony daubs up every thing with 
propolis. Stop and think what this one trait costs the comb honey 
producer. Some colonies gather double the amount of propolis that 
other colonies do. This can be reduced one-half in breeding by 
selecting the colonies that do not show this bad trait. 

Bear in mind these trivial things, as they will look to many 
bee-keepers, for they are of vital importance and sliould not be 
overlooked. The color factor in bees is a great guide to go by; that 
is, to a certain extent. If your bees have been bred pure for genera- 
tions then you are sure of the color factor. I wish my most beau- 
tiful bees would make the most honey. I am not blind to beauty. 
But I find after years of records of the best queens I could rear or 
buy, it was the colonies that were very dark, some showing only 
two yellow bands unless filled with honey. So I have found that 
colonies with bees too yellotv or too dark or black were not the 
largest producers. 

BSEEDXSrO PURE ITA.I.IANS THAT WERE BI.ACX. 

Several years ago the writer thought he could breed pure Ital- 
ians that were all black, with all the characteristics of the Italian 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



141 



•.,:,'^^^^ 



race. I found that I 
coukl l)reed the color 
all rii^hf. but the chor- 
acteristic's zccrc lost, 
for the blacker I got 
them the more like 
the pure black race 
with the same char- 
acteristics they be- 
came. I am not sat- 
is.fied with that test 
until I can select my 
dark queens and dark 
drones from a strain 
of knozcn purity, and 
take them where 
they will surely mate 
together. I will not 
give it up, for I can 
breed you nice three- 
banded bees of known 
purity that will shake 
off the combs and 
handle in many ways 
like the pure black 
bees, but they are not 

as irritable or nervous. I know that there are some who have bred 
bees as to color most beautiful to look at, 1iut in all those l>eautiful 
colonies of bees that I ha\e had, not one came up to the dark col- 
onies as to gathering- honey. 

/;/ all fancy stock there is so much to sacrifice for beanfy. 




The House the Bees Built for D, Ansuish. 



HEREDITV. 



Here hangs our success or failure in selecting a breeding queen. 
For a few years I bred from the queen that gave me the largest 
yield of honey, but I found that was not a good rule to go by, as 
some of those zrry best queens for honey proved to be poor breeders. 
In fact, I test every one, and have often been disappointed in them. 
Rut, when you do get one of those high flyers that is a good breeder 
you have got a price. 

My best l)reeders are always above the axerage on honey gath- 
ering. I test every breeder by rearing a few queens from her, being- 
sure to number each ciuecn l)y her mother's numl)cr. This way: No. 
5S-1, No. r)S--2, and so on up. Xow if I ha\'e a voung queen whose 
work looks promising I rear a few queens from her and number 



142 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




The Family the Bees Raised for D. Anguish. 

them, and in doin.i;- this I have gained a :cholc year on this queen 
as a breeder. 

Yon have all noticed certain colonies that have as many bees 
in the hives as other colonies that have a third more brood. Further- 
more, those same colonies keep their numbers steadily increasing, 
while the other colonies came to a standstill. This trait of longevity 
is separate from hardiness, and should not be confounded with it. 
If bees do not show length of life in the working season, over other 
colonies, we will not know that they i)ossess this most valuable 
trait. 

If you will take a frame of brood from these best bees and put 
it into a colony of black bees, or any inferior colony as to color, 
keeping a careful record when the last bees hatch, and when the 
last bees disappear, of these bees that you are testing, you will 
surely know, if in the working season, that you are right. Xo race 
of bees shows the trait or characteristic of hardiness like the black 
or German bee, to my knowledge. 

RANGZ: or FLIGHT. 

We must watch our bees to learn their range of flight. It will 
surprise some to know that some colonies in the same apiary fly 
less than half the distance that other colonies do. These are facts, 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 



143 



and I will say that the trait or characteristic of long- range of flight 
is strongly fixed in our vellow bees. 

Prolificness is all right, and all breeding queens should be pro- 
lific, but without the other traits and characteristics to go with it. 
it counts for nothing, and I think we have been misled by some 
writers advocating it so strongly, as we all know it is not our most 
prolific races that gives us the large yields of honey, and where one 
race would suit one location better, another race would be more 
suitable and more satisfactory for other locations. 

I do not know which is the best race onl}- for ni}- location, and 
right here let me say 1 did get some wonderful colonies from the 
Carniolan queens crossed with Italian drones, l)ut as they did not 
give me so much honey I discarded them. I had been led to believe 
that most any race of bees crossed with Carniolan drones would 
improve their temper. I got the worst stinging bees from Italian 
queens mated to Carniolan drones, and in all my experiments I 
never saw a hybrid colony that you could handle as you could a 
pure Carniolan or Italian colony, in all kinds of weather and honey 
dearths or flows. Take my advice if a bee-keeper says that his 
bees are gentle }'(>u can rest assured the\' are j)retty well l)red one 
wav or the other. 




The Bees Themselves of D. Anguish. 



144 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




What D. R. Hardy's Three-Year Old Queen Did. 
STOCK OF D. B. HABBV. 

I will tell you of one bee-keeper that has bred the Caniiolan- 
Italian crosses along the same or similar lines that the writer has. 
You would not know that there was much Carniolan blood in them. 
They are nice bees to handle; tliat is, most of them are. 

I have a queen from this apiary at least one-third Carniolan. 
mated in my own yard and it would take an expert to tell what 
the colony was. Italians and good ones the most of bee-keepers 
would call them. This bee-keeper is Mr. D. R. Hardy, Bur's Mills, 
N. Y. I bring this up to show you that there is a great Held for 
breeding bees. These bees are wonders for honey, and the only 
reason I discarded the Carniolan crosses was because of too much 
inclination to swarm. But will say that in testing four strains the 
past season, that it opened my eyes some, what the Hardy bees did 
in 1911. It was pleasing to notice what Mr. Hardy has done in a 
few vears bv selecting: in breeding', as he has had to select for color. 



THE STOCK I STARTED WITH. 

I got the first good Italian (jueen from L. H. Rol)ey and she 
I^roved such a wonderful queen that I reared a number of queens 
from her and, as they proved superior to all others, I used her for 
a breeder as long as she lived. 

About the time she died I found one of her daughters to take 
her place. This fiueen was a good breeder. The only fault with 
these bees was that some of them would cap their honey thin or 
"greasy," as some would call it; and, as these queens were gen- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 145 

•crally some of the best, 1 did not like to kill them. 1 tried \entila- 
tion. but it did no good. 1 found that this was a trait of certain 
colonics: that ])y changing" the queen I stopped it every time. I 
wish that it could have been stopped with shade and ventilation, 
for it would have saved some fine queens for honey. I found, how- 
ever, that by breeding from queens whose colonies capped their 
honey white, reduced this trait very much, although we will get 
now and then one that will cap their honey thin. 

I had to kill all such at that time, but now, with out-}-ards to 
take them to, I can save them until the proper time to requeen. 
lUit I would not have them in niy breeding yard at any price. If 
vou had fought this trait as 1 have, you would not lilame me. 

A PREMIUM QUEEN. 

Tt was about IDDO that I got a queen with Glcanini^s in Bee 
Culture as a premium. I would like to say right here that the Roots 
ne\er did a Ijetter thing in their lives for the bee-keeping world, 
and some day those who made sport of the long tongue and other 
comments about her will see their follv. She certainlv was a leon- 
dcrfnl queen. There are others only waiting to be found, and who 
will find them? 'JTie bee-keeper who is breeding and selecting will 
surely find more, just as good and better. She is not the only one. 
liut had the ones that made so much fun taken a daughter of that 
(|ueen. and done just a little selecting and breeding, we would now 
have far superior colonies at the present time. 

I reared queens from the Root queen and mated them to the 
Robey queen's drones. I got a great variation as to cohir, traits 
and characteristics. The next season I used a Robey queen, mating 
the queens to the red-clover queen's drones. I got so many good 
queens from this queen that 1 used her as a breeder for three sea- 
sons, discarding all the Root, except a few of the very best ones. I 
culled out all inferior queens, only keeping the best, replacing all 
poor queens with a daughter of the breeder. 

"PRIDE" PRODUCES 168 BOXES OF COMB HONEY IN THE FOURTH YEAR. 

i called this queen Pride, and she was well-named, for in her 
fourth year she produced ICxS boxes of comb honey, and nearly 
every one of those boxes was extra fancy honey. During her foui* 
seasons she was one of the best, producing over 200 boxes of comb 
honey for two of those seasons. Don't fear inbreeding. I thought 
I was inbreeding most too much, so 1 used a red clover queen, as 
a ])reeder. I got some wonderful queens from this queen, but they 
did not average up to the Robey strain. 

I had been testing three or four of the best Rol^ev queens for 
breeders, using the one for a breeder whose daughters gave the 
largest average — not cue queoi. l.iii (/// of theni. 1 will have to sav 



146 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

again, do not use a queen for a breeder whose daughters do not 
average over seventy-five per cent extra good queens, for you are 
taking a step back if you do. Eighty and ninety per cent are good 
breeders. Ninety-seven per cent is the best 1 ever had a queen do. 
This is a fact, and can be done again. Of course, I had the right 
drone mothers for that queen's daughters to mate with. I want a 
queen for a breeder that will reproduce Jiersclf, so strong in all good 
points, and that her daughters are very even in honey production. 

IKEV PRESENT BBEESER. 

The foundation of my strain now, after breeding these bees for 
eleven years or more (and I have the best queen mother I ever 
had), is a Robey queen, or from that strain on her mother's side, 
and everything leads me to believe that she was mated to a Robey 
drone, 

I have the color fairly fixed in this strain. The bees are easily 
detected from any queen mated to these drones. This queen is No. 
58. She has wintered perfectly every winter. She will be four 
years old in August, 1910, and has produced a large crop of honey 
every season. Yes, and did in 1910. Had some d^aughters that pro- 
duced more, but was one of the best at four years old, and is the 
mother of more extra good queens than any two breeding queens 
I ever had. 

I do not know just how many hundreds of queens I have 
reared from her, and scarcely a poor queen in the whole lot of them. 
Even the queens that are mismated are good honey gatherers. Some 
were hard to beat. 

I can not boast of beauty in my bees ; but, when it comes to 
honey, I will leave that to some one who has tested them to tell. 
Not only are these bees superior in a good season, but show their 
breeding in a poor season, producing a fair crop of honey, while 
some other strains scarcely make a living. 

I bought 70 colonies of 'black bees in the spring, 1909, putting 

them 3^ miles from the home apiary, which has 250 colonies. 

Mind you, I run the out-yard using full sheets of foundation in most 

of the shallow extracting supers, running them mostly for extracted 

honey, and they produced a little less than one-half as much per 

colony as the home-yard did, run for comb honey. I said mostly 

full sheets of foundation. The rest was drawn combs. There was 

more work and care to each colony than at the home-yard. 

{Continued in May issue.) 

(Judging by the flood of letters I have received, Dr. Bonney and Mr. 
Howe have started something. I have been very much surprised to learn 
what a live subject this question of "better bees" is. Many letters and some 
articles have been received which I would like to use, but I am afraid of 
drawing out the discussion so long that it will become tiresome to my readers. 
However, as you are the judge, if you would like it continued through several 
months more, just drop me a postal card to that effect.) 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 147 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL, Editor and Publisher 
Office — ^230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, MicUigan. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1S79. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Dlseontiniianoes — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
shouM send a rec|uest to that effect. 

Ailvertisins rate!^ on appliention. 



EDITORIAL 



Co-operation nurses ambition and begets independence. 



Fourteen National Branches and more coming. Join the pro- 
cession, brothers, it is your parade. 



Five thousand circuhtrs will have been sent out to National 
members and prc^spective members by the time this paper reaches 
you. Among other things, this circular will tell of the National 
plans, and give prices and freight rates on tin honey packages. If 
YOU don't 2:et vours write. 



Connecticut Bee-Keepers Convention. 

Secretary James A. Smith, Hartford, Conn., writes me that the 
Connecticut l)ee-keepers will hold their annual meeting at Hartford, 
in the Y. AI. C. A. Building, on Saturday, April 13th. A good pro- 
gram has been prepared, and tlie question of becoming a branch of 
the National will be considered. 



A Michigan Comb Honey Specialist. 

While Michigan is conceded to be a state of extracted honey 
specialists, there is at least one man who is making good at the pro- 
duction of comb honey, and that too in a location farther north than 
many would consider good for the production of comb hone3^ This 
man is L. Denzer, of Highwood, Alichigan. His yield last year, in 
spite of the poor season, was 11,000 pounds of comb honey from 148 
colonies, spring count. Mr. Denzer winters his bees out-doors in 
chafit hives. 



148 THE BEE-KEFPERS' REVIEW 

It Is Not What We Get But What We Expect to Get That Makes 

Life Worth Living. 

( )ne of my subscril)ers took me to task for the ab'.ne statement 
in the Vehruiwy Ri<:\"iE\\'. He says: "Don't tell me it is what I ex- 
pect that makes life worth ]i\'in;^-, etc. It is what I qet today, now,, 
that ccnints. I will take a little of heaven each da}-."' 

lUit you don't get the idea. Of course there is pleasure in 
what we get. but if we didn't have any anticipations for the future, 
if we weren't working towards something better, then what w^e have 
would soon get monotonous. Just so soon as we stop striving. 
just so soon do we lose interest. I a])]jreciate your view, but still I 
believe that I am correct. 



Spring Meeting of the Colorado State Bee-Keepers' Association in 
Montrose, Colorado, Friday and Saturday, May lO-lL 

The Montrose County I Jee- Keepers' .Association will be the 
host of the State Association at the spring meeting in Montrose. 
It is desired that every bee-keeper on the eastern, side of the moun- 
tains take the trip to Montrose and see this country. Homeseekers' 
rates will apply on the Denver & Rio (irande R. R. from Denver, 
Colorado Springs and Pueblo. These rates are good for 30 days. 
I would suggest that the way to go is via Marshall Pass and return 
by way of Grand Junction over Tennessee Pass. More of the 
country can be seen this way. 

The western slope bee-keepers in Mtjntezuma, La Plata, Mon- 
trose. Delta, Mesa and Carfield Ccumties are urged to turn out in 
full force. 

This will be a live meeting and you will regret it if you do 
not attend. \\E<,iJiy Foster, Sec rcfai-\. 



Winter Losses. 

Reports to this office are conflicting regarding the loss of bees. 
Some report splendid results, while others report heavy losses. The 
late fall made the extreme cold weather less dangerous, as the bees 
had not been confined so very long when the cold spell came. I do 
not look for excessive losses in the Xorth, at least. 

The South and A\'est, however, ofTer a different i)roblem. Bees 
would, no doubt, be more aft'ected by the extreme cold, as they are 
not so well protected as in the Xorth. ( )ne subscriber in Kansas 
reported heavy losses each of the last few winters, and this winter 
packed heavy, with the result that his bees have wintered perfectl}', 
while those around him suffered heavily. 

Send in your winter re])orts, for we are all anxious to know 
just how the bees have wintered in general. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 149 

Misbranding of Food Products. 

Duriny' the past \ear I have recei\e(l, I ])resume. sexeral hun- 
dred reports from the L'nited States Government regarding the mis- 
l)randing of food products, four of which may he of interest to 
Rk\ji-:w readers. 

"Sweet's Honey X'ermiluge"' was declared misbranded for two 
reasons. One. it did not contain any honey, and two. Ijecause it did 
not contain the amount of alcoliol the lal)e! showed. 

■'3vlrs. Morrison's l>rand Pure h'ood Products Honey. Xet 
Weight 8 Ounces. Prepared by A. A. Deiser & Ctmipany, Des 
Moines. Iowa,'' was declared misbranded liecause the sample exam- 
ined showed a shortage in weight. Six packages showed a shortage 
of 4.8(i per cent in weight, on an average. 

"Xorthern ( )hio Sugar." manufactured l)y the Standard Syrup 
Co.. of Cleveland. Ohio, and "'Maple Sugar." packed by the Standard 
Syrup Company. Cle\eland. ( )hio, were declared mis])randed be- 
cause they Ijoth contained cane stigar prei)ared in imitation of 
maple sugar. 

"Fireside I'.rand Cane and Maple Sugar Butter," packed for 
P»oren-Stewart Co.. Dallas. Texas, was declared misbranded because 
in addition to the two ingredients named on the lal^el it also had 
benzoate of soda. 

It is refreshing to notice that of all the cases reported there 
was only one of honey, and that only because it was short weight. 
Truly otu' national pure food laws are doing good. 



At the Home of a Canadian Bee-Keeper. 

The man who was responsible for my visit to the London con- 
vention, February "^Oth and ?^Iarch 1st, and who was apparently at 
the head of the work of getting up the program, was D. Anguish, 
of Lambeth, Ont. It is always necessary for some one man to take 
the lead, and as near as I could find out that man in this case was 
Mr. Anguish. 

After the convention adjourned its second session late Thursday 
night, through the courtesy of !Mr. and ]Mrs. Anguish, a whole 
'bunch'' of us bee-men and women took the six-mile trolley ride to 
Lambeth, and spent the night. In the party was Mr. Hershiser and 
son. Miss Ethel Robson and sister. Mr. Pettit and myself. 

Two other bee-keepers live across the road from Mr. Anguish, 
and 1 believe each of them brottght home "company." So you see 
we could have had a regular convention in Lambeth the next dav. 



150 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Not being' satisfied with all the trouble such a bunch would 
make, Mrs. Anguish had a midnight supper served, and I couldn't 
see but every one did justice to the same. 

After a tardy "getting under the blankets," we had only just 
nicely gotten to sleep, (so it seemed), when Mr. Anguish's gentle 
"Boys, it is morning again," roused us all to breakfast. I couldn't 
help noticing how he brought out that "again.'' 

After breakfast out we went through the three-foot snow (or 
more) to the bees. There they were packed in those four colony 
packing cases, almost covered with snow, l)Ut wintering as nicely as 
you could wish. Of course we had to have off a cover, run our 
hands down under the packing, and feel how nice and warm the 
bees were. Then by turning up the inside corner of the burlap we 
saw the bees just as lively and healthy looking as you could wish. 
Of course they will be right on the job next summer. 

Mr. Anguish told me that about ten years ago he gave up 
every thing else for the bees, and then he began to make money. 
Starting then with GO colonies, in debt, he now lias his beautiful 
home in Lambeth, a nice little bunch of money in the bank, and -iOO 
colonies of bees. In addition we mustn't forget to mention the 
splendid family he has reared besides, all of which is shown else- 
where in this issue. 

Back from the bees to the house we went, and ofif again to the 
convention. But of course we first explored his basement, saw his 
working room, honey pails, shipping cases, and the way he puts up 
his honey for market. Don't forget that he is a comb honey man, 
and he gets the price, too. If I am not mistaken he sold last year's 
crop for 20c per section. Of course he puts up an article that 
caters to the best trade possible. 



That London Convention. 



In spite of the fact that the Review got the announcement of 
the London convention somewhat mixed in its last issue, and tried 
to take it over to Toronto, there was a good attendance, and cer- 
tainly a full share of interest. Two "Yankees'' were present, O. L. 
Hershiser of Kenmore, N. Y., and myself. 

The discussions were practical, and such as would interest the 
bee-man who was in the business for the money there was in it. 
Spring manipulations, ripening honey, wintering and selling the 
crop, all came in for their share of the discussion. 

About spring manipulation, the opinion seemed to he that feed- 
ing for stimulative purposes should not be done before fruit bloom. 
Mr. McEwen. of Glandeboye, and Mr. Hershiser, of Kenmore, N. 
Y., both emphasized this point. 'Sir. McEwen feeds syrup T to 1, 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 151 

in little feeders out doors. lie does not feed, however, if bees have 
lots of honey. Increasing 9G colonies to 125 and securing 2G, 000 
pounds of extracted honey would prove that ^Ir. McKwen knows 
what he is talking about. 

A very interesting address was given by ^Ir. Clark, of Cains- 
ville. in which he urged the combination of bees with fruit and 
poultry. From 25 acres he sold last year $5,000 worth of produce, 
including honey, fruit and poultry. It developed, however, that ^Ir. 
Clark was really making more from his poultry, as he was selling 
very high priced birds for breeders or show purposes, and that he 
was really combining bees with the fruit and poultry instead of 
combining fruit and poultry with bees. In other words, bees were 
his side issue instead of the others. 

I learned that the credit of originating the plan of packing four 
colonies in one packing case belongs to Jacob Alpaugh. Many 
Canadian bee-keepers are practicing the plan with success, and it has 
the preference over cellar wintering with most of them. 

^lorley Pettit, of Guelph. Ont.. in explaining his plan of hand- 
ling bees and appliances, gave what to me was a novel, and I 
should judge, excellent way of fastening in foundation in brood 
frames. He simply wires his frames with four horizontal wires, but 
puts the top wire within one-quarter inch of the top barb, and then 
fastens it in the middle by driving a small staple straddle of the 
wire and into the under side of the top bar. This prevents sagging, 
and then all that is necessary is to simply imbed the wires into the 
foundation and the job is done. 

Mr. Kimball increases his colonies and re-queens both at the 
same time by a simple method. At the close of basswood he divides 
his colonies, and then simply grafts queen cells from the best col- 
onies to those he wishes to improve, of course, first destroying queen 
cells which may have been started in the latter. I am not sure but 
he has his queen cells started before his general division, and then 
simply gives the cell soon after the division is made. 

In locating very young larvre for queen rearing-. ^Ir. Hershiser 
uses a common reading glass. He says he can also light the smoker 
with it during a hot day, in case he forgets the matches. Which 
proves that you mustn't let the sun shine through that glass when 
you are looking for larva?. 

The convention report would not be complete without mention- 
ing the work of Miss Ethel Robson, who conducts the woman's 
department in the Canadian Bee Journal. Busy with her note-book 
all through the convention, yet she was not too busy to contribute 
her part to the interesting discussions, and what she said would in- 
dicate that she had a practical knowledge of the cause she is cham- 
pioning. 



152 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



SELECTED ARTICLES 

AND EDITORIAL COMMENTS 



Remedy for the Bee Moth. 
Bert H. blasters, Edison. Ohio, found that by putting eighty 
Indian runner ducks in his bee yard that they made short work of 
the moths flying around. To those of you who have ducks as well 
as bees the suggestion is worth remembering. — Glcaiiiiii;;s. 



Cost of Honey Production. 

Wesley Foster states that it takes him about twenty-fi\e days 
per year to handle one hundred colonies. He figures that at this 
rate, one man should be able to care for some five to six hundred 
colonies of bees without any help. He believes that if half of us 
could get at the cost of producing and introduce more systematic 
methods, we would probably be able to care for twice as many 
colonies as we now think possible. This we read in the American 
Bc'^ Journal. 



Double Super With the Excluder Between for Finding Queens. 
Take two supers, place a queen excluder between, fasten well 
together with shipping staples and. according to H. Harley Selwyn 
in Gleanings, you have an excellent arrangement for finding black 
queens. Put this arrangement on the ground in front of the hive, 
take out each frame and, after giving a hasty glance for the queen, 
if not found, shake the bees in the prepared super; repeat this per- 
formance until all frames have been shaken when, by smoking the 
bees the cluster will rapidly go below the excluder and the queen 
will be found with the drones above trying to get below. 



Honey Crop Reports. 

At the close of a splendid article in Gleanings on the above 
subject, \\'eslev hOster savs: ""There is no'.hing more necessary for 
the .stability of the honey market than accurate reports, and a central 
head to direct the distribution of the car load shipments of honey. 
The West is big and its product so large that something will have 
to be done to hold things steady. This is a need that the new 
National Association can supi)ly." To all of which we say '"Amen. " 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 153 

There is no reason in the world why the National can not assist 
alonj^ this line, and we believe the next few years will show some 
surprises to the bee-keeping fraternity as to what is possible. 



Windbreaks for Wintering, 

Editorially Gicaiiiiigs in Bcc Culture says they have noticed that 
a windbreak, where built solid, will sometimes protect one part of 
the apiary and in so doing divert the wind to another part, and 
that they are beginning to believe that a windbreak is more effective 
if it is not solid. Trees, brush, open fences and such things accom- 
plish the purpose of an open windbreak. 



Protecting Entrances During Winter. 

J. L. Byer tells of a plan used by a Mr. Davison for i)rotecting 
entrances during winter. It is some sort of a contrivance which 
fits over the entrance like a vestibule. Why not try a little pile of 
straw piled against the entrance, covering the whole with snow 
where possible? Of cotirse, this can not be done unless you are 
near the bees to remove the straw when warm enotigh for bees to 
flv. — Gleanings. 



Pollen Famines. 

^^"e often hear of honey famines, in fact they are a part of every 
A-ear's report, but the question of a pollen famine is not so generally 
imderstood. 

R. Buehne says in TIic Australasian Bcckccpcr that it is a serious 
thing with him. and gives an illustration of a case where queens 
were laying normally while the brood was not developed. There 
was no pollen in the hives and none coming in. 

He also noticed that bees appear sluggish and gather but little 
honey where there is no pollen in the hives or fields. I don't 
remember of any such reports on this side of the water, and yet I 
wonder just how much attention has been paid to it by our Amer- 
ican bee-keepers. 

Americans and Canadians. 

Samuel Simmons, of England, in a long article in the Canadian 
Bee Journal, gives the American and the Canadian a sharp rap be- 
tween the eyes over the results they are achieving. He does not 
feel that the amount of honey per colony we are securing is suffi- 
cient to crow over. He advocates a large hive, criticises the size 
and shape of the regular Langstroth frame. He uses a frame ten 
by sixteen inches and quotes an instance of a Mr. Eddows, formerly 
of Argentine, who used this size frame, securing an average of 330 
lbs. of extracted honey per colony, W'hile the use of the Langstroth 
frame gave him but 150 lbs. per colony. 



154 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

After all, we believe that the average American and Canadian 
is pretty well satisfied with the Langstroth frame, also, if there is 
any country where every size and shape imaginable have been tried 
out, this is certainly that country. 

Weighing Barrels of Honey. 

According to Gleanings in Bee Culture, A. 15. ^^larchant. of Flor- 
ida, weighs his barrels of honey by using a pair of steel-yards 
att?ached to the end of a long pole, which is used as a lever for 
lifting the barrel. A pair of grab-hooks are used, which catch each 
end of the barrel, and these hooks are hooked onto the steel-yard. 
The scheme is nothing more or less than fastening a long pole on 
a support so that it can be used as a lever, and attaching the steel- 
yards to the end of the pole. 

Just why northern bee-keepers suffer competition in the New 
York markets from Florida honey is explained when we remember 
that the freight rate from that territory to New York is only thirty- 
eight cents per hundred pounds. 



That California Association. ^ 

Editor York in the American Bee Journal goes after those Cali- 
fornians because of their withdrawal from the "National."' To me 
their action, instead of being a discouragement, is one of the best 
proofs possible that there was need of a change in the National 
laws. Please note that the action taken was based on the fact that 
they did not feel they had received returns in the past from their 
investment, and not because of any present action. True the raise 
in membership fee, no doubt, had some Ijearing, in that it brought 
the matter up for action. 

Just the same it will l)e interesting to those California bee-men 
to know that in spite of their action I am receiving individual mem- 
berships, and these are being placed in other National Branches, 
outside your state, and thus you are losing and will lose the support 
of many members who would otherwise be with you. If any State 
believes that by simply refusing to adopt the National Constitution 
they can thus kill the acti\ity of tlie National in their State, they 
are sadly mistaken. No, the National w^ants the sui)port of the local 
Associations, but if it can't ha\-e it then it Avill go calmly to work 
and organize their National members in that State, and thus estab- 
lish a competitive organization. It isn't a question of wdiether the 
National will be represented in }-our State, boys, it is sim])ly a 
question whether the National will have the support of your Asso- 
ciation without taking such steps. The plans of the National are 
meeting with approval, and it is only a question of a short time 
when National Branches will be flourishing all over the United 
States and Canada. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 



155 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 

' r 

ft 



FANCY 




NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey l~c to 
ISc. Light amber 16c. Amber 15c. Fancy 
white extracted 10c to lie. Light amber and 
amber extracted 8c to 9c. Wax 30c. 

BIAKE LEE CO., 

Alar. 23. 4 Chatham Row. 



CINCINNATI — Market on comb honey is 
about cleaned up. No. 1 white selling in job- 
bing way at $3.65 per case, retail $4.00. Light 
amber extracted in barrels at 7c, in cans T^ic 
and 8c. White extracted in 60-pound cans 10c. 
Beeswax fair demand at $33 per hundred. 

Above are selling prices not what we are 
paying. 

C. II. W. WEBER & CO. 

Mar 22. 



TOLEDO. — Replying to your postal of 
l/18th, beg to advise that there is practically 
■no change in quotations from our last. All 
grades of honey are quiet, and owing to cold 
weather, we do not look for any demand until 
the weather moderates. Beeswax is in fair 
demand and brings from 30 to 35c, depending 
on quality. 

Jan. 19th. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 



KANSAS CITY, Mo.— Our market is clean- 
ing up fast on both comb and extracted honey. 
No change in prices. We quote: No. 1 white 
■comb 24 sec. cases $3.25. No. 2 white comb 
24 sec. cases $3. No. 1 amber comb 24 sec. 
cases $3. No. 2 amber comb 24 sec. cases 
$2.75. Extracted white per lb. SJ/^c to yc. 
Extracted amber per lb. 8c to Si/2C. Extracted 
dark per lb. 5^<c to 7c. Beeswax 25c to 2Sc. 

C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 
Mar. 22. 



NEW YORK CITY— We have practically 
nothing new to report. The market remains in 
about the same condition. Comb honey is well 
cleaned up, and what few little lots arrive, 
find ready sale at former prices. 

Extracted not moving very fast, plenty of 
supply of all grades excepting California water 
white and white sage, which is pretty well 
cleaned up. Prices remain about the same as 
in our former report, but in quantity lots even 
these prices have to be shaded in order to ef- 



fect sale. Beeswax steady at from 30c to 31c 
per pound. 

HILDRETII & SEGELKEN. 
Mar. 22. 



DENYER — We have no comb honey to quote, 
our market is entirely cleaned up. Our job- 
bing quotations on white extracted are 9c, 
light amber Sc, strained O^c to 7!4c. We pay 
2(ic in cash and 28c in trade for clean, yel- 
low beeswax delivered here. 

THE COLORADO HONEY PRODUCERS* 

ASSN. 
Mar. 23. 



CHICAGO — Despite the cold weather honey 
has not sold as freely during March as has 
been its wont, and all grades of comb honey 
other than A No. 1 to fancy are difficult to 
sell. For the best grades the market is firm 
at from 17c to ISc per lb. and the off grades 
are from Ic to 5c per lb. less. Extracted 
honey is steady in price, but the movement is 
not large and with stocks now on hand the 
prices are not likely to be any higher. White 
extracted ranges from Sc to 9c per lb. with 
amber from 7c to 8c, all according to kind, 
body and flavor. Beeswax is in good demand 
at 30c to 32c per lb. 

R. A. BURNETT & CO. 

Mar. 22. 



CINCINNATI.— The condition of the honey 
market reminds one of a ship that is beached, 
and must await the high tide to move it. It is 
useless to try to offer any inducements to make 
sales, and to cut prices, owing to the small 
profit, would not only be a loss but would ruin 
the conditions. Nevertheless, we do not over- 
look opportunities to make sales. For the 
fancy grades of table honey we are getting 
from 10c to 11c a pound in 60-lb. cans, and 
for amber honey of the better grades from 
Sc to 9c, while for the low grades from 6c to 
7c, according to the quality and quantity pur- 
chased. These are our selling prices: Comb 
honey is moving somewhat slower than for 
some time back, and we are now getting from 
$3.75 to $4.00 a case. For choice, bright yel- 
low beeswax, we are paying 30c a pound in 
cash, delivered here. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO. 
Feb. 25. 51 Walnut street. 



156 



IHE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



o= 



-o 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
ad'i'ertisement in this department. 



BEES AND QUEENS. 



Wanted. — Carload of bees for cash. John 
C. Bull, Gen. Del., Hammond, Ind. 

Wanted. — Carload of bees (300 hives). F. B. 
Cavanagh, Hebron, Ind. 

Colonies of Italian Bees in L. hives, 10- 
fr., full of stores — any time. Jos. Wallrath, 
Antioch, Cal. 

For Sale. — Bees, queens and supplies. Pure- 
blooded poultry and eggs, way below standard 
prices. A. M. Applegate, Reynoldsville, Pa. 

Nutmeg Italian Queens, after June 1, $1.00. 
Circular. A. W. Yates, 3 Chapman St., Hart- 
ford, Ct. 

Front Line Italian Queens, well bred and 
hardy. After June 1st, 6 for $4.50. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. T. V>. Hollopeter, Pentz, 
Pa. 

Choice Italian Queens, delivery beginning 
April 15. Untested, 75 cts.; tested, $1.00. Ten 
years' experience in queen-rearing. Send your 
orders now. F. Hughes, Gillett, Ark. 

Queens. — Mott's strain of Italians and Car- 
niolans. Bees by pound, nuclei. 'I en-page list 
free. Plans for Introducing Queens. 15 cts.; 
How to Increase, 15 cts.; both, 25 cts. E. E. 
MoTT, Glenwood. Mich. 

For Sale. — Moore's strain and golden Italian 
queens, untested. $1.00; six, $5.00; twelve, $9. on. 
Carniolan, Banat, and Caucasian queens, select. 
$1.25; six. $6.00; twelve, $10.00. Tested, any 
kind, $1.50; six. $8.00. Choice breeders. $3,011. 
Circular free. W. H. Rails, Orange, Cal. 

For Sale — After May 15th, a few breeding 
queens of G. B. Howe stock, select mated to 
drones of a well built up comb honey strain of 
dark Italians, $5.00 each. Untested in June, 
$1.00 each, for $5.00. D. G. Little, Hartley, 
Iowa. 

Queens and Nuclei. — A strain of Italians 
developed for honey-gathering ability. My en- 
tire time has been given to them for 12 years. 
W. D. Achord, Fitzpatrick, Bullock Co., Ala. 

Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, V^a. 

Quirin's famous improved Italian queens, 
nuclei, colonies, and bees by the pound, ready 
in May. Our stock is northern-bred and 
hardy; five yards wintered on summer stands 
in 1908 and 1909 without a single loss. For 
prices, send for circular. Quirin-the-Queen- 
Breeder, Bellevue, O. 



Golden Queens. — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, five 
and six band, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also 
nuclei and full colonies. Send for circular and 
price list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. lOth St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tested Italian Queens by return mail, $1.00 
each. Queens reared last fall and just in their 
prime. Safe arrival and satisfaction guaran- 
teed. Send for price list. J. W. K. Shaw & 
Co., Loreauville, La. 

If you wish the best of untested three- 
banded Italian queens send us your orders — 
75 cents each, $8.00 per dozen. Safe arrival 
and satisfaction. Xo order too small nor too 
large to receive our prompt attention. The 
Golden Rule Bee Co., Rt. 1, Box 103, River- 
side, Cal. 

Golden and 3-Banded Italians. — 'lested, $1 
each. 3 <-.ueens $2.75; 6 or more, b5c each. 
I'ntested, 75c each; 3 queens, $2; 6 or more> 
(i5c each. Bees per pound, $1. Nuclei, per 
frame. $1.25. (No disease here.) C. B. 
Bankston, Buffalo, Texas. 

For Sale. — Early Italian (Frofalcon) Queens. 
February and March deliveries for untested, 
$1.50 each; April, $1.25; Tested Queens, 50 
cents additional. Select tested, $1^00 extra. 
Breeders, prices upon application. Sweet Clo- 
ver and .'Mfalfa Seed. Send for prices. John 
C. Frohliger, Berkeley, Cal. 257-9 Market 
St., San Francisco. 

HONEV AND WAX. 

For Sale. — Amber and buckwheat honey in 
new CO-lb. tin cans. C. J. Baldriuge, Home- 
stead Farm, Kendaia, N. Y. 

Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. Hiloreth & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

For Sale. — Water white and light-amber 
alfalfa and light-amber fall honey, put up in 
any size packages. First class. 

Dadant & Sons, Hamilton, 111. 

For Sale. — Clover, basswood, alfalfa, sage or 
light amber fall honey. First-class stock put 
up in any sized cans. Send for price list. M. 
V. Facey, Preston, Fillmore Co., Minn. 

MXSCEI.I.ANEOUS. 



For Sale. 
hives cheap. 



-New and second hand S frame 
Ehlers & Son, Carthage. Mo. 



For Sale. — Vogeler process comb founda- 
tion, 10 frame redwood hive bodies 25c each, 
and poultry supplies. J. Stansfield, Fruitvale, 
Calif. 

For Sale. — .\ full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



157 



Will pay 20 cents each for February, 1904, 
April or June, I'JIO, numbers of the Bee- 
Keepers' Review. O. A. Kee.v, Topeka, Kans. 

In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton', Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 

For Sale. — New crop of alfalfa seed; 4 
pounds by mail, prepaid, $1.10; 50 to 100 lbs., 
14^ cts. per lb. Sacks, 25 cts. e.xtra. 

R. L. Snodgrass, Rt. 4, Augusta, Kansas. 

For Sale. — A brand-new Kenmore automo- 
bile, used only for demonstrating. Can be used 
for delivery or pleasure car. Will sell at a bar- 
gain. Louis Werner, Edwardsville, 111. 

For Sale — A. I. Root Supplies. Every- 
thing needed in the apiary. Send for cata- 
logue. Prices right. Sawyer & Hedden, Irv- 
ington, New Jersey. 

For Sale. — Empty second-hand 60-lb. cans, 
as good as new, two cans to a case, at 25 cts. 
per case. C. H. W. Weber & Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 

Penna. Bee Keepers: Having bought supply 
business of Geo. H. Rea, can furnish complete 
line of Roots goods. Full car just in; catalog 
free. Thos. H. Litz, Osceola Mills, Pa. 

Free. — Catalogue of Bee-keepers and Poul- 
try supplies, describing our goods. Also of 
Barred and White Plj-mouth and White Wyan- 
dotte chickens. Best of goods. Lowest price. 
Square treatment. Prompt shipment. H. S. 
DuBV, St. Anne, IlL 

POSITIONS AND HEIiP. 

Wanted. — Position with bee-keeper in South- 
ern California. Can give the best of referen- 
ces. C. B. Baxter. Nauvoo, 111. 



FOUIiTBV. 



Wanted. — Position by young man of good 
habits with a bee-keeper in the South Atlantic 
Coast States; has had experience in a small 
home apiary. Can give good reference as to 
character, reputation, etc. Marcus Eggers, 
Rt. 1, Eau Claire, Wis. 

Wanted. — Apiarist who has had experience, 
and who knows how to raise good queens cheap- 
ly; who can do anyw-ork with bees alone, yet 
follow instructions when given. Give refer- 
ence. State wages wanted first letter. H. C. 
Ahlers, West Bend, Wis. 



S.SAJ. ESTATE. 

For Sale. — 560 acres of land in Arkansas, in 
the rice belt. Half cash; balance, city property. 
T. J. Greenfield, Hickory Ridge, Ark. 

For Sale. — Old homestead farm of los 
acres; good buildings; best farm in the neigh- 
borhood; $40 per acre. H. S. Thompson, 
Franklin Forks. Pa. 

Fruit Lands, general store in English col- 
ony; apiary locations for sale, rent, or trade; 
bees, queens, honey, wax hives, and other sup- 
plies; fine opportunity for tropical bee-man with 
small capital; climate and lands finest in the 
world. Gather honey the year round. No land 
agent. I own all I offer. D. W. Millar, 

Bartle, Oriente, Cuba. 



Buff Orpingtons — S. C. Cook's birds di- 
rect. Great winter layers. 15 eggs $2.00. R. 
B. Chipman, Clifton Heights, Del. Co., Pa. 

Partridge Wyandottes. — Adapted to any 
climate; eggs and stock for sale. C. M. Myers, 
Winchester, Ind. 

Buttercupa and Houdans for large white 
eggs. Fine cockerels $3.00 and $5.00. 
RivERviEw Poultry Farm, Union City, Mich. 

For Sale. — Silver Spangled Hamburgs, Stock 
and Eggs. Eastman Kodak, takes pictures S]/i 
by 5^2; good as new. H. L. Bowers, Port 
Royal, Pa. R. F. D. 1. 

Indian Runner Ducks, dark fawn, hardy, 
great foragers, heavy layers, pure white eggs 
15 for $1.00; 100, $5.00. Wm. Stumm, Edin- 
burg. 111. 

Pigeons! Pigeons! — Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
our specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Prize-winning S. C. R. I. Reds, thorough- 
bred White Orpington, Barred Plymouth Rocks, 
Indian Runner ducks, fawn and white; white 
egg strain; eggs. Day old ducks. David M. 
?l am mono, Woodside Poultry Yards, Rt. 5, 
Cortland, N. Y. 

I h.we the typical Indian Runner Ducks. 
They^ are the queen of all layers and as far as 
beauty the artist's brush has never surpassed. 
They stand pre-eminently of today. My foun- 
dation stock are from the original winners of 
the Jamestown Exposition. 13 pure white eggs 
$1.06; $7.00 per 100. Satisfaction guaranteed 
or money refunded. This advertisement will 
be lived up to to the letter. Robt. Bird, Pinck- 
neyville. 111. 



ADVERTISED ARTICLES. 

The next time you go to the grocer, 
take a look around and note what 
articles j-ou buy. Win', it's t'ne ad- 
vertised ones, of course. You don't 
ask for "rolled oats." you name your 
brand. The same is true of almost 
everything 3x11 buy. The advertised 
article must have merit behind it. The 
day is past for the unknown goods. 
You buy froiii those who have confi- 
dence enough in their goods to adver- 
tise them. Just yesterday I received 
a letter from one who subscribed for 
the Review in order to get next to the 
queen-breeders who would advertise 
therein. 

Dealers, show your confidence in 
what you handle by advertising it. 



158 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Paint Without Oil 

Remarkable Discovery That Cuts 
Down the Cost of Paint Seventy- 
Five Per Cent. 

A Free Trial Packase is Maileil to 
Everyone T»ho AVrites. 

A. L. Rice, a prominent manufacturer 
of Adams, N. Y., has discovered a pro- 
cess of making a new kind of paint 
without the use of oil. He calls it 
Powderpaint. It comes in the form of 
a dry powder and all that is required 
is cold water to make a paint weather 
proof, fire proof and as durable as oil 
paint. It adheres to any surface wood, 
stone or brick, spreads and looks like 
oil paint and costs about one-fourth 
as much. 

"Write to Mr. A. L. Rice. Manuf'r., 303 
North St., Adams, N. Y., and he will 
send yo"u a free trial package, also 
color card and full information show- 
ing you how^ you can save a good many 
dollars. Write today. 



PORTER BEE ESCAPE 




WILLING 

to try my plan and increase your profits on tJie 

sale of honey? 
Sold my 1911 crop for 2.5c per section. I'll 
send complete sample for 25c (coin) for post- 
age and packing — You'll lose money if you don't. 
I am willing to help you. 
.<'. S. sHAFEJt, 
Dent H. • 311 ^ ft.. So. Oinalin, >>b 



Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

i right, Powerful. Economical, 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in your home. If your 
de.'iler hasn't got them, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
manv as you want at 25c each. 
-AGENTS WANTED EVERY- 

"tHe' STEEL MANTLE LIGHT CO. 

.<■: Iliiriin St., Toledo, O. 



*I*I'<K CI. OVER SEEn 

Medium red, large red, alfalfa. Sweet clo- 
ver and grass seeds in general; also 

s;^ED CORN 

Several varieties and thoroughbred. Write 
for prices and catalog apiary supplies. All 
seeds of high purity. 





SAVES 
TIME HONEY MONEY 

15e eacli, $1.05 doz. All Dealers. 

3Ianiifactiired only by 

R. & E. C. PORTER, Lewlstown, III. 

MEXICO AS 
A BEE COUNTRY 

B. A. Hadsell, one of the largest bee-keepers 
in the world, has made six trips to Mexico, 
investigating that country as a bee country, 
and is so infatuated with it that he is closing 
out his bees in Arizona. He has been to great 
expense in getting up a finely illustrated 32- 
page booklet describing the tropics of Mexico 
as a Bee Man's paradise, which is also stt- 
perior as a farming, stock raising and fruit 
country, where mercury ranges between 55 
and 98. Frost and sun-stroke is unknown. 
Also a great health resort. He will mail this 
book free by addressing 

B. A. HADSELL, Lititz, Pa. 

WANTED 
WHITE HONEY 



Both 



comb and extracted. Write 
us before disposing of 
your crop. 



HILDRETH & SEGELKEN 

265-267 Greenwich St. 

New York, N. Y. 



C ARNIOL AN S -SUPERIOR WINTERERS 

How have your Ijees wintered? 
Have they wintered satisfactory? 
Are they somewhat weak? Would 
you like your bees to winter in 
better condition? Carniolans stand 
the long, cold winters of our 
Northern States the best. Write 
'Superiority of the Carniolan Bee." 
FREE. ALBERT G. HA.NN. 

lie Oii«en Breeder. PITTSTOWN. N. J. 




Scienl 



E. A. 



Carroll Co. 



SlVEI.I,, 
Milledgeville, 111. 



Italian, Cyprian, Carniolan, Caucasian and 
Banat Queens. Bee Supplies. Honey Packages. 
AVALTER C. MORRIS, 

74 Cortlan«lt St., 

lVe»v York City. IV. Y. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



159 



LARGE ORDERS 



For 



^/, 



,tt 



falcon 

Bee - Keepers' Supplies 



Hives. .Seotioiis, Koiiudntious, 

Ktc. (AH Our Own Mnuu- 

facture). Are Our 

Speeialtj'. 

The equipment of our manufacturing 
plant and the location of our factory ou 
the Xew York Central and Erie Kail- 
road systems fits us better than any 
other plant to fill orders for the large 
beekeeper. The quality of our goods 
has been a standard toward which 
others strive. 

Get our prices oti your requirements 
delivered if you desire. 

No want too large — no want too small 
for the "FALCON" factory. 

RED CATALOG 

postpaid upon request 



W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

jriiere the good bcc-hives come front. 

Factory, Falconer, N. Y., or 117 North 

Jefferson Street, Chicago, 111. 



SATISFACTORY 

RESULTS 

Will be obtained by using M.\NU- 
FACTURED COMB FOUNDATION, 
which embodies PURITY, TOUGH- 
NESS, TRANSPARENCY, COLOR and 
the PURE BEES WAX ODOR of the 
NATURAL CO^ilB as made by the 
HONEY BEE. 



SUCH IS THE 

DITTMER PROCESS 
COMB FOUNDATION 

Send for Samples. 

-MI other Bee Keepers' Supplies at 
prices you will appreciate. We will be 
pleased to send you our 1912 Catalog, 
for the asking. 



Gus Dittmer Co, 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



"Griggs Saves You Freight." 



TOLEDO 



Is the best point to get goods quick. 
Send us a list of the goods you v^ish 
and let us quote you our best price. 

ORDER NOW 
Bees will soon be Swarming 

HONEY'' AND BEESWAX wanted 
in exchange for supplies. 

We also handle Butter, Eggs, and 
all kinds of farm produce. Write us 
what you have to sell. 

S. J. Griggs & Co. 

Toledo, O. 

Xo. 26 Erie St., near 3Ioiiroe 
"Grisss, the King Bee" 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young basswood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 



160 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



When You Buy Lewis Beeware 
You Get... 



LEWIS Q,TJALiITV — Which means that all Lewis Hives are made out of clear white 
pine, and Lewis sections made out of fine bright basswood. The material in these 
goods is the best obtainable and selected by experts. 

LEWIS "W'ORKMAXSHIP — The Lewis factory is equipped with ths latest improved 
machinery constantly watched over by experts. The Lewis head mechanic has 
had thirty-five years of bee supply experience, the superintendent of bee hive de- 
partment twenty-nine years, the superintendent of sections twenty-eight years. 
These and many other skilled men have a hand in all the Lewis goods you buy. 

LEWIS PACIvIXG — All Lewis Beeware is carefully and accurately packed — a patent 
woven wood and wire jiackage made only by the Lewis Company, is employed largely 
in packing — this makes the package light, compact and damage-proof. 

LEWIS SERVICE — Years ago all goods were shipped direct from the factory with 
attending high freight rates and delays during the honey season — now Lewis Bee- 
ware can be obtained almost at your own door. Over thirty distributing houses 
carrying Lewis Beeware by the carload are dotted all over the L'nited States and 
foreign countries. Write for the name of the one nearest you. 

G. B. LEWIS COMPANY 



Manufacturers of Beeware 



WATERTOWN, WIS. 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 



Power 



SAWS 



in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 



384 Ruby Street, 



Rockford, Illinois. 




"If goods are wanted quick, send to Pouder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
My equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 
excelled. 

PAPER HONEY JARS 

For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, lndianapolis,lnd. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 



i 



ONE MORE MONTH 

• • • m,_^ IT • • • 

Bargains inBee Supplies 

Take advantage of the Closing Out 
Sale of the Page & Lyon Go's 
Stock of 

OLD RELIABLE 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Send for Catalog and write me just how 
much and what you want, and I will 
quote you NET PRICES. 

J. F. KENKEL, Trustee 

for Page & Lyon Mfg. Co. 
NEW LONDON, WISCONSIN 



Figure This Out For 

XT fC If You buy Bee -Supplies 

I OlirSClri NOW that you will need 
■^^^^^^— — ■^^^~ in April you Save Money 
at the rate of 12 per cent'on the ^. 

Three per cent is the amount of our early order discount on 
cash purchases in January. January to April is just three months 
— ]/4 of a year. Now, 3% for 3 months is interest at the rate of 
]2% per year — so you see why we urge early orders accompanied 
by cash this month. 

Another reason is that we can serve you better now than 
three months hence. In a few weeks we will be putting up car- 
load shipments for our dealers and distributing centers and every 
effort in our big plant — the largest establishment in the world 
devoted to the manufacture of bee-supplies — will be directed to 
filling rush orders. You will be just as anxious for your goods as 
our other patrons, and will deserve and receive the same attention 
— no matter what the amount of your order may be, but 

WE CAN SERVE YOU BETTER NOW. 

and we want to make it worth your while to place an early order. 
Try this on a part of your list anyway. Saving at the rate of 12^ 
per year ought to interest everybody. 

WE MANUFACTURE EVERYTHING IN 
BEE-SUPPLIES. 

Get our 1912 catalog which gives descriptions, illustrations 
and prices on everything from bee-hives to bee-books, from frames 
to comb-foundation. Get this catalog now. 



The A. I. Root Company 

MEDINA, OHIO 



THE CHAS. F. MAY CO.. PRINTERS, DETROIT, MICK 







PubJishGd Mont% 




MAY 
1912 

▼ ▼ ▼ 

DETROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLUR PER YEAR 



Completely Equipped 



cuteBcor 



A classy big- car — that will fairly fly over the roads. De- 
sigrned. for the utmost comfort and attractiveness, rive 
passengrer capacity. 




SEIiF-STARTER, TOO. 



^ The special features of the Cartercar make this the best 
popular priced touring car value on the market. It has the 
patented Friction Transmission which makes it far superior 
to any gear driven car from an efficiency standpoint. It 
will climb a 50% grade — has any number of speeds — one 
lever control — no jerks or jars — and without the usual gears. 
^ Four other excellent models. They are every one lead- 
ers in their class. Full floating rear axle, valve encased 
motor, three quarter rear elliptic springs, and all modern 
ideas. Let us send you catalog. 

Cartercar Company 

Pontiac, Michigan 

BRANCHES: NEW YORK, CHICAGO, DETROIT, KANSAS CITY. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 161 

As a Shipping Point Cincinnati can 
not be Excelled 

for tliis section of the country. We are located on the great trunk lines for points soutli 
pf us, and orders received from this territory are shipped out at once on direct routes so 
that customers are assured of prompt service and a minimum charge for transportation. 

Coupled with the advantages offered by these resources is the service we maintain for 
our patrons. At this season of the year our stocks are complete, and we are making 
extra efforts to handle orders with the greatest dispatch possible, so that there may be 
absolutely no delays in filling hurry orders. Our long experience in the supply business 
enables us to anticipate your wants to such an extent that we have included your order with 
ours to the factory, so we are simply waiting your instructions to get them started to you. 

For the small beekeeper, and those who have a part of the supplies they will need for 
the coming season, we have goods put up in small original packages. For instance, there 
is foundation of all grades packed at tlie factory in one, two, three, four, and five-pound 
cartons. Sections of all standard sizes in cartons of 100,. 2.50, and boxes of .500. These 
small packages enable the beekeeper to buy in quantities just suited to his needs, with the 
assurance that the goods will reach him in the best condition possible, and with no loss on 
account of a broken package. 

If you have lost some bees the past winter, don't he discouraged, but prepare to make 
tlie very most of those you have left, or to replenish your hives, for the coming season is 
l)ound to be a good one; ajid if there has been quite a loss in your vicinity there will be 
all the more nectar for your bees to gather. Be sure that the season finds you prepared 
to give them plenty of room in which to store the harvest when it comes. 

If you haven't had your catalog from us, there is one ready to mail if you will give 
us your present address. 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 

2 1 46 Central Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 



Aspinwall Non-Swarming Bee Hive 



A Practical Success after 22 years of Experimentation. An- 
other season has added to its success. 

Evenly filled sections of Honey Produced without separators. 

Will Double the Yield of Comb Honey. 

Every Bee-Keeper should satisfy himself as to our claim 

by ordering at least one sample Hive and testing. 

Descriptive circulars with prices mailed free. 
A * 11 l\/r£ r^ 601 SARIN STREET 

Aspinwall IVllg. ^^O., jackson,michigan,usa 

Canadian Factory: Guelph, Ontario 
World's Oldest and Largest Makers of Potato Machinery. 

CUTTERS :: PLANTERS :: SPRAYERS :: DIGGERS :: SORTERS 



162 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



IF BEES COULD TALK 

They Would Say : 

"GIVE US 

*Dadant's Foundation' 



IT'S CLEAN, ITS PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES " 



If you are not using "DADANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DAD ANT & SON S, iVA',!?^'?^: 
A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 



BINGHAM SMOKERS 

Insist on Old Reliable Bingham Bee Smokers; for sale by all 
dealers in bee-keepers' supplies. For over 30 years the standard 
in all countries. Tlie smoker with a valve in the bellows, 
direct draft, bent cap, inverted bellows and soot-burning device. 

Smoke Engine, 4-inch each $1.25; mail, $1.50 

Doctor, 354-inch each .85; mail, 1.10 

Conquerer, 3-inch each .75 ; mail, 1.00 

Little Wonder, 2-inch each .50; mail, .65 

Honey Knife each .70; mail, .80 

Maniifafturt'd ouly by 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

Cirauil Raiiiil.s, Mioli. 




Protection Hive 

The best and lowest price hive on the market. This 
hive has yi material in the outer wall, and is not 
cheaply made of ^ material like some other hives on 
the market. Send for circular showing 12 large illus- 
trations. It will pay you to investigate. 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 




THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



163 




WW \\ ^ ^ \ \>\ \ W:^ 
THE CHARMS OF OUR SUMMER SEAS 

Spend your vacation on the G reat Lakes, the most economical and enjoyable outing in America. 
WHERE YOU CAN GO 

Daily service is operated between Detroit and Cleveland, Detroit and Buffalo; four trips 
weekly between Toledo. Detroit, Mackinac Island and way ports; daily service between 
Toledo, Cleveland and Put-in-Bay. During July and August, two boats out of Cleveland and 
Detroit, every Saturday and Sunday night. 

A Cleveland to Mackinac special steamer will be operated two trips weekly from June 1.5th to 
September 10th, stopping only at Detroit every trip and Goderich, Ont., every other trip. 
Railroad Tickets Available on Steamers. Special Day Trips Between 
Detroit and Cleveland, During July and August. 

Send 2 cent stamp for Illustrated Pamphlet and Great Lakes Map. 
Address: L. G. Lewis, G. P. A., Detroit, Mich. 
Philip H. McMillan, Pres. A. A. Schantz, Gen'l Mgr. 

Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company 



EVERY BEE-KEEPER 
TO INVESTIGATE- 



WANTED 

The Boyum Foundation Fastener 




I'atented Aug. 1st, 1911. 



MERITS AND CLAIMS. — Takes four sections at one time, while in section 

holder or not. Can put in corner starters. Can put in top and bottom starters, or corner 
starters at the same operation. Fasten the starters by "soldering" them to the wood. No 
handling of the sections separately. Simple, easy and handy to operate. Does better and 
faster work. Never too warm for the starters. No fastening to table, wall or floor. No 
treadJe. No levers. No smoky blade. No dripping of wax on lamp, table, floor or cloth- 
ing. Saves time and work. Insures better built combs. It is strictly up-to-date. Price 
complete with lamp (25c burner) $1.30. Without lamp, S-Oc. Sizes other than 4x5 and 
4 '4 square, 20c extra. State for wdiat style sections wanted. Remit by Money Order. 
Manufactured by 

THE BOYUM APIAKIE3 CO., RU3HFOKD, MINN., U. S. A. 



Established in 1878 



Italian 



Caiionsiaii 



I will sell a limited number of one, two and 
three-frame nuclei this coming season. "The 
best bees on earth," broad statement but never- 
theless true. 100% wintered. By the way, I 
am breeding queens in Houston Heights, Texas, 
as well as here in Michigan. All apiaries isol- 
ated. Prices right, and sent free. 

n<>.v <i1, Lansing, Mich. 

Rox 8-, H<»nHt<»n Heiglit.s, Texas. 



AI.SIKE Cf.OVF.R. SF'.Rn 

IMedium red, large red, alfalfa. Sweet clo- 
ver and grass seeds in general; also 

si<:d:d corn 

Several varieties and thoroughbred. Write 
for prices and catalog apiary supplies. All 
seeds of high purity. 

F. A. sxf:m,. 

Carroll Co. Milledgevillc, 111. 



You get best RESULTS from our 
Classified Liner Columns. — Try them. 



164 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Do you Like 
to be Stung' ? 

What's the use of wearing an old 
style net bee-veil that blows in 3'our 
eyes, sticks to your face, and gives the 
bees a chance to hand you a hot one? 

The Muth Ideal Bee Veil 

(75 CENTS, POSTPAID, 70 CENTS 
WITH OTHER GOODS ) 

keeps the bees at a distance because it is 
made of light indestructible wire and 
strong cloth. You can see through this wire as if it wasn't there; and 
you can smoke inside the veil all 3'ou want. It can't catch fire. 

If you bujr the has-been kind of veils 

You certainly ARE "Stung"! 

Look what dollars of satisfaction you get out of it ! No doubt about 
this — it's the best-ever veil on the market. 

Better send for one today — don't be a drone! 

We're big people in all bee supplies — ask for catalogue. 

^he Fred W. Muth Co. 




THE BUSY BEE. MEN, 



51 Walnut Street, 



Cincinnati. Ohio. 



The Fruit Belt oj Michigan 

Offers Wonderful Opportunities to Bee Men, Orchard- 
men and Farmers. 

Land values are at present very low — $15 per acre upwards — people are 
just waking up to the possibilities in this favored section. Some have already 
begun to cash in and others are coming along in a remarkable way. Land 
values will increase rapidly as the basic values are here — Soil, Climate, Prox- 
imity to Markets. 

Let us tell you what we can do for 3'ou. Write us frankly today as to 
your ideas, available means, etc. 

Air. Tyrrell will vouch for us. 

FRUIT BELT LAND CORPORATION, 

52 Greenbush St., Manistee, Mich. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



165 



Prominent Beekeepers 
have pronounced the 



Jt 



"falcon 

RED CATALOG 



"The most logically arrangerl and 
easiest from which to order" for the 
busy bee-keeper and beginner, of an\ 
ever published. 

This is the first attempt of any 
supply manufacturer to classify their 
catalog, to bring all hives, and hive 
parts, all supers, all implement.s. 
honey containers, etc., and our for- 
ward step in this particular is in line 
with our advanced manufacture of 
hives. 

If you do not have a copy of our 
19i:i catalog, drop us a postal for it 
It'.s gladly mailed free. 



W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

Where tlie good bee-hwes come from. 
Factory, Falconer. N. V. 



SATISFACTORY 

RESULTS 

Will be obtained by using MANU- 
FACTURED COMB FOUNDATION, 
which embodies PURITY, TOUGH- 
NESS, TRANSPARENCY, COLOR and 
the PURE BEES WAX ODOR of the 
NATURAL COMB as made by the 
HONEY BEE. 



SUCH IS THE 

DITTMER PROCESS 
COMB FOUNDATION 

Send for Samples. 

All other Bee Keepers' Supplies at 
prices you will appreciate. We will be 
pleased to send you our 1912 Catalog, 
for the asking. 



Gus Dittmer Co. 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



'•Griggs Saves You Freight." 



TOLEDO 



Is the place all eyes are on now. 

Every well posted beeman knows it 
is the largest shipping center in the 
V. S. This is the reason the Cadillac 
Auto Co., of Detroit, are going to move 
their main plant here, to get shipping 
facilities no other city affords. 

The SWAR:MING SEASON will 
soon be here; don"t delay ordering, 
but send us your order today. Largest 
stock of ROOT GOODS on hand, and 
a big carload on the way. 

Get our special prices on CLO\ ER 
SEEDS for spring sowing. We will 
save you money. 

HONEY and BEESWAX wanted. 

Send for catalog, and special whole- 
sale prices on POULTRY FEEDS and 
supplies. 

S. J. Griggs & Co. 

Toledo, O. 

X«. -<> >. Erip St., near ;>Ionr»e 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young basswood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 



166 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




A MONTHLY JOURNAL 



DEVOTEDTOTHE INTERESTS OF HONEY PRODUCERS 

33ubUBl|fb bg Hije National iSpf -iKprppra* AaBoriatton 

E. B. TYRRELL. MANAGING EDITOR 

Office OF Pu BLicATioN - - - 230 \A/oodlan d Aven u e 
VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, MAY 1, 1912. No. 5. 

A Summer Revel With the Honey Makers. 

W. Z. HUTCHINSON. 

'^^^ IVING in a city, and editing- a monthly magazine, it is a 
Tl rare treat each summer to hie me away to Northern Mich- 
igan, to the home of the huckleberry and the speckled trout, 
where the wild deer drinks deep from little sparkling- lakes with 
white, pebbly beaches, where forests of magnificent beech and maple 
stretch away for miles unbroken, where still lingers some of nature's 
wildness, and in this delightful region revel in the harvesting of 
some of nature's most delicious product — a crop of honey. 

As the lumbermen cut away the grand old forests, the wild, red 
raspl)erries spring" up in myriads, the blossoms of which furnish 
bee pasturage that is simply incomparable. The honey is thick and 
heavy, white in color, and has a delicious flavor all its own — a flavor 
that smacks of the wild, red raspberry of the woods — and in this 
region lives a brother who manages five apiaries, devoting his whole 
time to the business, and it is in August, when he is extracting his 
honey, that I make my annual visit. 

To reach my destination the same day, I must start at five 
o'clock in the morning. There is an old mother and an invalid 
daughter to care for at home, hence my wife and I can't take our 
vacations together, but she takes special pains to get me an appetiz- 
ing little breakfast — sends me oft" with a full stomach, a pat on the 
back, and a loving kiss on my lips. 

Simply a ride of a few hours by rail, is a decided vacation for 
me. The motion has a soothing effect, and. above all, there is a 
chance to visit zi'itJi 7)iyself. I can sit by the window and let my 



168 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

mind wander at its own sweet will — think of what it pleases — it is 
no longer in the harness. 

A little past noon I reach the end of my railroad journey, and 
how good it looks to see Elmer, wnth the horse and red wagon, 
waiting for me. There are hotels and livery stables in town, but 
anybody can patronize them — we have a better plan. A mile out 
on our road, we know of a little spring brook that goes babbling 
through a grove by the roadside; and here, to the accompaniment of 
the horse grinding his hay and oats at the w^agon box, we turn our 
attention to the contents of the dinner pail, while Elmer tells me 
the news ; that the hives of honey are "piled up as high as your 
shoulder." W'hy is it that such common things as bread and but- 
ter, dried beef and pickles, have such a flavor when the consumer 
has his back against a tree in the woods? 

After driving out two or three miles we come up over a ridge 
that allows us to look over the valley in which flows the Manistee 
river. How blue the distant hills look across on the other side; 
and there always comes to me the feeling that over there is the 
"promised land." Perhaps this feeling comes from the fact that 
over among those wooded hills nestle the a})iaries. 

The next day the wagon is loaded with tools, bedding and pro- 
visions, and we drive away to one of the apiaries. A part of the 
way our course lies along the high banks of the Manistee, the most 
famous trout stream in the world, then we drive along old, grass- 
grown lumber roads that wind hither and thither, and are banked 
on either side with the vines of wild berries, or canopied over with 
the branches of trees. Occasionally we hear the distant tinkle of 
some settler's cow bell, the song of wild birds greets the ear, there 
is a "woodsy" odor in the air, and the feeling of freedom and buoy- 
ancy becomes so strong as to break out occasionally in snatches of 
song. 

When removing the honey we live in the honey house and keep 
bachelor's hall. Let me describe our breakfasts: Boiled potatoes, 
not common potatoes, but such as grow only in the virgin sand of 
Northern Michigan, crisp and mealy, bread and butter, coffee, and 
great, big dishes of wild blackberries covered with cream obtained 
of a nearby settler. 

Work in the apiary has for me a peculiar fascination : To stand 
out among the hives at midday, and watch the bees as they leave 
their hives with quick, upward sweeps, and return so heavily laden 
that many fall short of the entrance, rest a moment, and then crawl 
wearily in ; to find each breath actually redolent with the aroma of 
newly gathered nectar; to look up and see clearly outlined against 
the blue sky, an intricate, mazy network of dark, circling lines 
drawn by the busy workers as they eagerly go and come ; to listen 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



169 




An Apiary in the Wild Raspberry Regions of Northern Michigan. 
(Photo by li: Z. Hutchinson) 



to the music from the myriads of tiny wings ; to thus stand, and 
gaze, and listen, is to have come stealing over me a raptui-ous feel- 
ing of enthusiastic admiration. 

The first night that I stayed at the apiary, after my companion 
was asleep, I crept to the window, pushed it softly open, leaned my 
elbow upon the window-sill, and. for a long time, looked out upon 
the little city of white hives bathed in a flood of moonlight. The 
stars g'littered overhead, myriads of fire flies twinkled over the low 
lands along by the brook, and away in the distance could be heard 
the weird, lonely call of the whip-poor-will. These are all common 
things, and yet, they filled my soul with thoughts that are beyond 
expression. 

A week slipped by like a glimpse into paradise, and then, one 
morning, I enjoyed the best part of my vacation — with cool brain 
and steady nerves I again gathered up the tangled threads of busi- 
ness at the office. 
Flint, 'Mich. 

(I offer no apologj' for printing the above article. It doesn't tell you much 
about bee-keeping, but it does tell you a whole lot about a much more serious 
problem, the problem of life. The late Mr. Hutchinson did not profess Chris- 



170 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



tianity; I believe did not belong to a church; but if you can read the above 
article and did not feel a spirit of reverence shining through the whole of it, 
you can do better than I can. 

The article tells a story. Here was a man who could find his pleasures and 
inspirations in the little brook, the unbroken forest; each had a message of love 
and comfort for him. Picture the view he describes seeing from that open win- 
dow. How many of us, looking out of that same window, would have seen 
what he did? 

For one year I have been saving this article. It is the only one I have from 
Mr. Hutchinson. I am publishing it now as a fitting remembrance of the man 
who founded the Review, and whose last number was the May number for 1911 — 
just one year ago. Surely the bee-keepers lost much in the death of Mr. W. Z. 
Hutchinson, May 31st, 1911. 

The care of the old mother and the invalid daughter now falls on the widow, 
Mrs. W. Z. Hutchinson, who still resides at Flint, Michigan. Bravely she is 
doing her duty as she sees it, and I hope she will pardon me for telling you that 
the road at times is dark indeed. How much the bee-keepers owe to Mrs. 
Hutchinson for her part in Mr. Hutchinson's work you will never know, but I 
assure you it was no sm.all part that she did. I wish many ot 3-ou might write 
her a letter of good cheer when you read this, but don't ask her to answer it, 
as it would be a severe task on her time. I assure you she would appreciate it.) 



How Bee-Keepers in Switzerland Mark Their 

Queens. 

STEPHEN ANTHONY. 

^^^ O the Editor of the Bee-Kei-lpkrs' Rrniew : — Re-marking queens 
\^j with paint. On page 317 of your journal you raise a ques- 
tion as to paint for queens' backs for the purpose of easier 
finding -them. Once more, "there is nothing new under the sun." 
The Swiss bee-keepers have been using such paint for the last eleven 
years, and right here before I start I must acknowledge my indebted- 
ness to Dr. Kramer's book. "Rassenzucht fiir Schweizer Imker." 
obtainable from Paul A\'aetzel. Freilnirg im Baden, Germany; price 
50 cts. The name of the publisher in Gleanings is wrongly spelt. 
The marking was adopted by the queen-breeders principally for the 
purpose of preserving the purity of the Swiss race of brown queens 
and is practically continued for that purpose only. Of course, the 
bright mark on the back materially helps finding the queen even in 
a populous colony. And the occasion for adopting the mark was 
this: 

Often a queen sent by the breeder and introduced by the pur- 
chaser is lost in the introduction or in the first examination ; and if 
the queen raised by the bees does not do good work, complaints are 
raised against the breeder. The adoption of the mark has made all 
these sort of troubles a thing of the past. 

However, there are no unmixed blessings in this world, and so 
the mark also has a very serious drawback, because the process of 
putting it on, and probably also the mark itself, excites the queen 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 171 

and the bees, too. and that might easily happen at a critical time, 
as many a beginner mad on marking has found it out to his cost. 
So the beginner is advised to use the mark only for the purpose 
of distinguishing' voung queens that have proved themselves g'ood 
for some time and are to be left with their OAvn children, from 
whom, of course, no danger for them is to be apprehended — say at 
an autumn or spring examination, as he may come across them quite 
unexpectedly. A queen just hatched or a virgin being introduced 
into a mating box or one just mated, or a queen introduced any- 
where, he is earnestly warned not to touch. And in general it is 
advised not to chase after young queens or queens lately introduced 
just to satisfy childish curiosity. A breeder of experience, of course, 
owing to his greater skill and knowledge, may do in the interests 
cf the Imriness all these things and others also that a novice is warned 
to leave alone. 

KIND or PAINT USED. 

The paint used is a Cjuick drying varnish — white, yellow, red and 
blue, obtainable in Switzerland from bee-keepers in a large way, 
queen-breeders and supply dealers. But a good usable paint for the 
purpose may easily be made by any one at home thus. The great 
trouble is to keep it. Obtain, if, for instance, you want yellow 
paints, just the smallest possible quantitv of chrome yellow from a 
painter. Rub it up well with spirit varnish to a smooth, thick con- 
sistency, and when ready add to it as much sulphurous ether as 
will make it flow pretty easily. Cork it up quickly and secure the 
cork well, for it must not evaporate. Always shake up well before 
using. 

A net made of wide-meshed tulle is also required to hold the 
queen without hurting her while she is being painted. The rim of 
the net is a convenient ring cut out of cardboard to which the tulle 
is fastened by wax. by sewing on or by pins. A sharp pointed 
wooden chip like the usual wooden toothpicks makes the best of 
brushes. 

HOW TO APPLY THE PAINT. 

The modus operandi is simple, the greatest difficulty being to 
find out how little paint on the end of the stick will do. The best 
way to get the paint ready for business and to get just the right 
quantity on the end of the stick is just this: Have your paint just 
right ; not too thick or it will not stick, nor too thin or it will run 
and smear, but just right! Then before using shake it up well with 
your stick right down to the bottom. AMpe the stick clean. Then 
after dipping it into the bottle touch the table with the paint and let 
a drop run ofT. AMiat is left is just right. Touch the queen with 
it quickly, but do not let just a drop or lump stay on her back. It 



172 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

must be gently si)read over her l)ack-])late, so as to liecome, as it 
were, part and parcel of her back plate itself, llien up with the net 
quickly or the queen in moving- about might wipe the paint olT, or 

smear it. Easy — is it not? Just the same, a beginner is most 
earnestly advised to practice on common bees first merelv to find out 

how little paint will do. 

RETURNING THE QUEEN TO THE HIVE. 

After the operation it is best to put the cpieen into a circular 
introducing cage where she may trot about while the paint is dry- 
ing. She must not get cold, and to prevent that she may be put 
into a mating — or a nucleus box — the open end of the cage having 
been first stopped up with good candy. 

To paint a queen running about free is not advised; it is so 
easy to smear her face and eyes or her wings. But a queen may be 
painted on a brood comb if found (mi one. Fix three long pins for 
legs into the rim of the net ; thus put it over the queen and mark 
her as descriljed. But when you come to lift the net do not take 
it ofif altogether until the queen walks out from under it herself, 
then sprinkle the whole comb with a fine spray. Sprinkle it well. 
Waitete, Amodeo Bay, Auckland, Xew Zealand. 

(To the subscribers who have followed the recent writings on marking 
queens, this article from first hands will be read with interest. It not only gives 
the advantages of the marking system but points out the dangers as well. It is a 
splendid addition to what has already been said. ) 



A Punch for Piercing End-Bars. 

E. F. ATWATER. 

'^'^^\ FEiW years ago, Mr. llutchinson illustrated a punch which 
^,.^^\ he used to punch at once the four holes in each frame end- 
bar. 

No doubt this machine was quite satisfactory with good soft- 
pine but after trial of a similar tho improved machine, with our pine, 
which is often quite hard and grainy, we found several dififictilties. 

Some end-bars would split, while a diagonal grain in others 
would bend the awls, as well as getting the holes out of alignment. 

Then there was often a burr-edge left on one side of each hole, 
making the insertion of the wire difficult or impossible. 

As we have an engine to run our extractor, it seems the logical 
thing to use it for as much t)ther work as possible, so we built the 
machine shown in the cut. \\'e use only three wires in standard 
frames, so we had three spindles turned as shown, with pulleys key- 
seated on one end of each, while in each opposite end a hole was 
drilled to take a ^-inch "Yankee" 1)it, secured with a set-screw. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



173 



The divided boxes 
are of hard-wood, 
babbetted, and the 
sliding table has a 
gauge on which two 
end-bars are placed. 
The machine is used 
in a horizontal posi- 
tion. This sliding 
table with gauge 
and two end-bars in 
position, is shown 
in cut. The end- 
bars are marked AA. 

Table with two 
end bars is pushed 
up against the drills 
and the three holes 
are bored in both 
end-bars as quickly 
as the hand can 
move. 

But a few hours 
are required to bore 
thousands of e n d- 
bars, and the holes 
are uniform and 
clean, as thev should 
be. 

In our next ar- 
ticle, we will illustrate and describe our method of wiring, 
real practical wiring gauge, that does really save time an 
in better work. 

^Meridian, Idaho. 




E. F. Atwater Uses This Punch for Piercing End Bars. 



, with a 
d result 



Decoy Hives — A New Use for Old and Spoiled 

Sections. 

DR. A. F. BONNEY. 

'^Jl i^AViING occasion to use a consideral^le nuniber of decoy 

^ 1^ hives, and finding the transferring of captured swarms a 

sometimes prolonged task, I cast about for some way to 

overcome the difficulty, the result of which was a decoy-hive made 

to take my regular brood frame, or two of them, in some cases. 



174 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 



Those having Danz frames will have to put ^^-incli blocks in 
each end of the box to keep the frames from getting out of place, 
but 'for the Langstrath, or Hoffman frame, blocks in one end will 

be all that are need- 
ed, but short rab- 
bets must be cut in 
the front inside edge 
of both ends to let 
the end of the top- 
bars go in, when 
the cover being put 
on the frame will 
be held securely. 
The great advantage 
of this style of de- 
coy-hive is that to 
hive a colony cap- 
tured all one has to 
do is take out the 
frame with bees and 
brood, put it into 
the hive v\ath the 
rest of the frames, 
replace an e m p t y 
frame in the decoy 
hive, and the job is 
done. 

Running out of 
convenient frames 
last spring, and hav- 
ing a few spoiled 
sections, I set a cou- 
ple of section hold- 
ers in the decoy 
hive I had, wedged 
the sections in and put it out, later on fixing a few more the same 
way. I caught one swarm, found it when there was sealed brood 
in it, cut out the brood and transferred to a hive, and feel now like 
advising others to use their old sections in this way. I, at this 
writing, have 100 decoy hives made, shall construct a few more for 
this season's use, and may have a story to write about it this fall. 
I have made arrangements with some of my farmer friends to 
take out each a few decoy-hives, put them up into trees about the 
farm, and for each swarm brought in I am to give five pounds of 
honey. This is a mutually advantageous arrangement. The rest 




Just a Little Box; A Few Sections, and Dr. Bonney Catches 
the Run-Away Swarm. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 175 

of the hives I have our dravman put up and takes down, as my 
days for climbing trees are about past. 

Instead of giving exact measurements for a decoy-hive, I will 
just say: make it of any kind of an old store box, let it be a little 
longer and deeper, inside, than the length and width of the frame 
you use, and allow two to three inches on each side of the frame, 
or you may use more than one frame. A person can fasten together 
two or more spoiled sections and put them into the top end of any 
size box, or they can put a box full of sections up, allowing bee 
ways of course. Use a little ingenuity, and any kind of a combin- 
ation can be profitably made. 

The attached drawing shows the hive with sections in place, 

also the cover with its little sliding door which is held open or shut 

with a crate staple. I fasten on the covers of my decoy hives with 

screws, nails or crate staples, whichever comes handiest. 

Buck Grove, Iowa. 

(Here is a suggestion to the reader who is just starting in bees, and who is 
anxious to get more bees than his pocket-book will warrant. Just how successful 
you will be with this method depends largely on how many stray swarms there 
are flying around. I should look for better success where there are more farmer 
Ijee-keepers than specialists, as they are not apt to have the swarming problem so 
well under control. It won't cost much to try a few deco\- hives this 3-ear and see 
what success you have.) 

Transferring From Box Hives. Does It Pay? 

HARRY LATHROP. 

'^^2V ^rONG the questions propounded in the Review is the one 
^-^^. asking for the best method of transferring from box hives. 
The simplest and best method is that of getting the 
queen and most of the bees out of the box, by drumming or other- 
wise, and then to place the box over a queen excluder until the 
brood has hatched, when the box can be broken up and the coml)S 
made into wax. 

But why transfer a box hive, seeing that it is good property 
and will pay a better income from the investment than most any- 
thing you can buy? Did you know that a big tall box hive that 
you may buy of a farmer who never saw a queen in his life, will 
winter better and throw off a larger swarm than the best of our 
movable frame hives? Our hives are made for manipulation, but 
when it comes to wintering and breeding up in the spring for the 
early honey flow, they are not in it with the old-fashioned box hive. 
So I say if you are in a locality where there is no foul brood to 
bother, keep the box hives and I will tell you how I work them. 

ADVANTAGES OF A BOX KIVE. 

The box hive, if it is the right size and shape, will have an 
ideal brood nest which the bees have fixed to suit tliemselves. It 



176 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

will be most sure also to have plenty of stores in just the right posi- 
tion for the use of the bees in winter, and for rapid building up in 
the spring. \Vhen the time for expansion comes, which may be 
in fruit bloom, pry off the top of the box and o\'er it place a brood 
chamber of nice worker combs containing some honey. It will not 
be long until the queen will work up and establish a brood nest 
above. Xow watch until, on a day just about when the main honey 
flow is ready to open, you look in and find the queen above. Set 
the upper hive oft' on to the stand and remove the box to one side, 
cover it with a sheet or carpet the first day until you have all the 
field workers into the new hive with the queen. As the box will 
have only a few young bees you can smoke in a young queen on 
the evening of the day that the division is made. Then remove 
them to a new stand and work them for extracted honey. 

They will make a fair crop of surplus if the season is a good 
one and will be ready to go into winter in good condition and the 
same process can be gone through the next year. The colony on 
the old stand should give you a big surplus. If you got the box 
hive for a dollar and a half, as I have done sometimes, I think you 
will conclude that there are worse investments (including mining 
stock). I just wish I had one hundred of those tall ones, about 14 
inches square inside, and 20 inches deep. It makes little difference 
what the stock is, they will get the crops any way, but you can 
Italianize by running in young queens or giving ripe cells to the 
box part at the time of division. In this way you can soon have 
any strain you desire in the boxes. In a sheltered apiary and the 
boxes wrapped with black paper, there should be no winter loss in 
these hives. I have purchased these box hive colonies in the fall 
at $1.50 each, wintered without loss and the honey and increase for 
the first season was worth $10.00 per colony, and I had the original 
number of box hives left. If foul brood gets in you would probably 
be obliged to break them up and get rid of them entirely. 
Bridgeport, A\'is. 
(Another way would be to pile on extracting supers, with drawn combs, let 
the queen occupy as many of those combs as she desired, run them for extracted 
honey, and then after the flow make a colony of the bees and brood which is in 
the extracting com1)s, adding to this colony all the bees which may hatch from 
the original box as fast as hatched for three weeks. You now have your colony 
in a frame hive and have secured a honey crop. The old hive of course is 
destroyed, and the combs made into wax.) 



My Experience in Producing Bulk Comb. 

S. F. MILLER. 

^^^K BOUT twent}'-live years ago, I made the assertion at a 

-^"X Wabash county bee-keepers' convention that if we could 

succeed in producing bulk comb honey and sell it for ten 

cents per pound at a profit, we might succeed in the bee business. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 177 

(In those days honey sold at low prices.) But as for our trying to 
produce section honey in our part of the country, we cannot do it; 
our honey seasons are too short. 

In those days our big clover fields produced an abundance of 
nectar, which stimulated the bees to go wild on swarming; we 
called it the "crazy swarming fever." There was no way to control 
the swarming to any extent, except to work the bees for extracted 
or bulk comb honey. In those days the extracted honey sold at too 
low a price for any profit, when we could produce the bulk comb 
just as cheap as the extracted. The bulk comb sold for 10 cents, 
extracted GjA cents, section 11 and l'2}/2 cents. 

In later years, to control swarming more thoroughlv. I used 
vents, slatted dummies, about one or two in a brood chamber (10 
frame hive) and to very good success. This, however, required 
more ^vork than I liked, and so about eight years ago I made an- 
other great change. 

DISCASDS QUEEir EXCIiUDEBS, THICK TOP BABS, ETC. 

On account of the clover fields going on the decline in nectar 
producing, I discarded entirely all queen excluders, vents, dummies, 
following boards, thick top bars in brood chambers and honey- 
boards. As to the section cases, I piled out all separators and 
fences ; in fact, I "let down the bars," took out all the bar-rails and 
threw them away. 

In tiering up for surplus honey, the surplus cases should be put 
on quite a while before the bees are making preparation for swarm- 
ing or before the honey flow. First put on the second story, the 
same as though you were going to work them for extracted honey. 
Now you put three empty combs against one side for extracting, 
next insert six empty frames with good three-quarter inch starters 
of light brood foundation. This is nine combs for a ten-frame hive. 
Now space them as nearly exact as you can, put on \'Our canvas or 
oilcloth and place your lid over all. Pile on a couple of bricks or 
stones to hold everything solid. 

FBOSirCES SECTION HONE7 A1.SO. 

When the upper story is about two-thirds filled up, and you 
think the honey flow is going to continue, put on your section case, 
on top of the second story. If the honey season continues, put on 
another one. A\'hen they get the upper story filled, the swarming is 
altogether likely controlled and they go ahead in the sections. In 
an eight-frame hive you use three empty combs and four empty 
frames with starters. 

It is plainly to be seen that if you have left out the honey 
boards and queen excluders and thick top-bars there is nothing to 



178 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

prevent the bees from clustering- from the bottom of the brood cham- 
ber to the top of the second story. This gives them the double 
advantage of holding the heat of a cool night and of being ready 
for their work next morning, instead of receding into the brood 
chamber and crowding and clogging it, while their work above is 
getting cold, as is often the case when, in working for section honey 
the bees are divided up, a small handful to a section, which is the 
cause of their receding to the brood chamber of a cool night. This 
is the condition in our part of the country. If I lived in a section 
of country where there is a longer-continued flow of honey, I would 
work for section honey. 

The purpose of the three empty combs in the second story is 
to get the bees started up, and they fill those empty combs, and then 
go right ahead with their work of filling the empty frames with 
the finest of well matured comb honey. I sometimes think the bees 
fill the empty frames about as quickly as they do the empty combs. 
Sometimes I put on a third story for bulk comb. 

BUIiK COMB FAYS. 

Some one asks whether bulk honey sells on the market. I 
should say it does sell. We sell bulk at I23/2 cents, extracted 10 
cents, section 15 cents. We sell the greater part of our honey right 
at home. Farmers come for the bulk, from all over the countr}^ 
with dish-pans, jars, buckets and lard-cans with lids. The last 
named is the kind of vessel that I ship bulk comb honey in. I cut 
out the L frames, set the big slabs on end in the big cans, and 
when they are filled I ship them by freight with perfect safety. 

I fill mail orders from the cities. I take what we call the odds 
and ends, that is, combs that are not filled out square and nice, 
very tender combs, combs that are not capped well on one side, 
broken combs and bulged and half filled sections, — these T take and 
cut up in fine shape and place them on No. 5 oval wooden dishes, 
two pounds to the dish. (I first lay a small square of oil wrapping 
paper in the dish before laying in the honey, — this keeps the dish 
from leaking). These dishes go out by the hundreds. We have 
them on hand constantly for the home retail trade, lliey are most 
handy for the grocers, for all they have to do is to wrap them up 
and hand them out to the customer. I wrap these dishes of honey 
carefully, pack them in boxes and barrels and ship tjiem wherever 
I wish. You see they are always ready weighed out. 

Now the waste from those odds and ends, we throw into the 
dump, a tub for that purpose. AA^ith a heavy stamper I mash them 
fine, then throw them into the colanders, together with the cap- 
pings from the extracting combs, to drain. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 179 

It is a neat job to shape up the hundreds of pounds of odds 
and ends into the 2-pound wooden dishes, so that they will show 
ofif in fine shape. They are even more delicious looking than the 
sections. It's a trade. Sliced comb looks tempting. Of course the 
price has something to do with the selling. 

One point more : Should there be any brood in the lower edge 

of the bulk combs or in the combs for extracting, these frames 

should not be lifted from the hive, l^ut spaced to one side until the 

brood has emerged. 

North Manchester, Ind. 

(We should like Friend Miller to tell us, at some future time, just when he 
sells this bulk comb honey, and whether he has any trouble with it candying. 
That seems to be the big objection to bulk comb in the North. The plan out- 
lined by Mr. Miller looks practical to me, if that question of candying does not 
interfere.) 



Queen Breeding. 

J. C. FRANK. 

' ^i^ OSSIBLY the highest attainment of a successful bee-keeper, 
X I in this day and age, is the skill in breeding a higher grade 
9^ of queens for his apiaries. Honey production and rearing 
queens are to a certain extent antagonistic to each other in practice. 
The producer of honey must build up his colonies to the greatest 
strength possible; while the breeder of queens is continually and 
unavoidably depleting his colonies and keeping them reduced in 
strength. Hence the queen breeder is liable to have, on hand in 
the fall, a lot of weak fragments of colonies that will have to be 
doubled up and fed, at a great expense, if he wishes to take them 
through the winter. 

Here the question comes up, which is the most profitable, pro- 
ducing honey or rearing queens? This depends upon the extent of 
pasturage, location and market. If the bee-keeper is in a fair loca- 
tion for honey, he had better sell his honey at ten cents per pound 
rather than rear queens for the market at one dollar each ; for the 
care, attention, labor and expense attending the production of first- 
class queens, are very great indeed. 

As the queen is the prime factor of a colony, it is essential that 
she should possess all the requirements for successfully performing 
her especial functions. If we desire to improve the qualities of our 
bees we must commence with the improvement of the queens. 

BOOM FOB IMFBOVEMENT IN BEES. 

That there is room for the improvement of the honey bee, I 
think can hardly be questioned. A\'e know that both plants and an- 
imals have been improved upon in the last twenty-five years, and 



180 THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 

why should bees be an exception to this natural law? Our de- 
licious and wholesome apple of the present day was originally the 
sour, miserable Siberian crab; our sweet and juicy peach was from 
a bitter fruit of Asia; our improved Irish potato sprang from an in- 
significant tuber of South America. Our improved breeds of horses, 
cattle, hogs, poultry and in fact all of our plants and animals, have 
been brought up to their present state of perfection by intelligently 
and carefullv breeding up from the wild originals. How far 
this improvement can be carried with the bees is difificult to deter- 
mine, as the organs of reproduction in the queen as well as her 
fertilization are, I may say, anomalous, so unlike the breeding of our 
domestic animals that the queen breeder Avill always have a lot of 
difficulties to contend with. 

In breeding queens of any variety of bees there is a tendency to 
sport and run back towards the original, especially is this true in the 
yellow varieties. For this reason it is important to select breeding 
queens that possess a strong individuality, and capability of stamp- 
ing their characteristics upon their progeny. This information can- 
not be had by the mere appearance of the queen, but by practically 
testing her queen and worker progeny. 

DRONES SHOUI.D BE SEI.X:CTi:i». 

It is very important to select the most desirable drones for the 
purpose of fertilization. Drones should be reared with as much care 
and attention as our queens, and during the breeding season see to 
it that your apiaries literally swarm with drones from the choicest 
breeders. Drones from a vicious and irascible colony may corrupt 
the worker progeny of the majority of the young queens in an 
apiary. All impure and objectionable drones should be disposed 
of by frequently examining the colonies and shax'ing ofT the heads 
of the young drones in the cells; by cutting out the drone comb 
and inserting worker comb in its place, and by the use of drone 
traps. For this object I know of nothing better than Allen's queen 
and drone trap. 

The highest type of a queen can only be obtained when all the 
conditions for her development are the most favorable. These con- 
ditions we can learn by observing a colony the evening before 
swarming. The hive is crowded with young bees, the temperature 
is maintained at a uniform heat ; honey and pollen are plentiful, 
and the entire colony is infused with life and intensity of purpose to 
perpetuate the race. Hence it would be but natural for them to put 
forth their best energies in the development of the future queen 
that is to lay the eggs to produce the population of the colony. 
Therefore, the breeder should study the economy and condition of 
the bees at swarming time, and endeavor to keep his breeding col- 
onies in approximate conditions. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 181 

THi: BEST QUEENS COME TROM THE BEST CEI.I.S. 

Queen cells built in full colonies are generally fine and well 
formed, and the queens correspondingly fine. This is as they should 
be under the most favorable conditions of full colonies. If the cells 
are examined they will usually be found to be long, rough, with 
indentations on their surface ; and the amount of royal jelly depos- 
ited around the embryonic queen to be very abundant. In some 
cells it is in excess of consumption, and a large quantity is left after 
the young queen has emerged from the cell. 

\Mien a colony is deprived of its queen they instinctively go to 
work, as soon as the excitement attending the loss subsides, to rear 
another. They are ready to do the work; but in order to get the 
best results, we must supply them with all the requisites and es- 
sentials. 

The egg of the queen is analogous to the eggs of fowls and 
birds. It has its delicate coverings, albumen and yolk ; and when 
the little germ within develops and bursts the shell, it emerges a 
tiny worm or grub, scarcely discernible with the naked eyes. This 
is now the perfect age of the larvae for the bees to develop into a 
queen. Always select the larvas as young as possible, but never 
over two days old. At three days old it produces poor and puny 
queens, and after the larvse gets four days old it is entirely worth- 
less for breeding purposes. It has been demonstrated time and 
time again, that the royal jelly is most abundantly elaborated by 
young bees, and for this o'bject they must be fully supplied with 
both honey and pollen. The temperature of the hive must be high 
enough not to chill the larvre. 

In order to get the larvse of the right age you must insert a 
frame of nice, clean worker comb in the center of the brood nest 
of your hive that contains your breeding queen, and if this colony 
is strong and the queen prolific — a condition in which it should be 
kept — the comb may be filled with eggs by the next day ; but if the 
comb is not clean and has been out of the hive for some time, the 
queen will refuse to lay in it until the bees clean and polish the 
cells. They frequently fill the cells of such comb with honey, 
rather than have eggs deposited in it. 

Queen breeding is not queen rearing; therefore I shall not take 
up your time by describing the new or old methods of queen rear- 
ing. This work is not perfect or complete. It is merely a starting 
point in the right direction. 
Dodge City, Kansas. 



182 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Improving Your Bees While Producing Honey. 

GEO. B. HOWE. 

(Continued from April number.) 

What would other breeders think of our inditterence in selecting 
our males? This part of the bee breeding has been sadly neglected 
for years. 

Would a breeder of fast horses select a draft horse for a sire, 
or would a breeder of a great milking strain of cows select a sire 
of a beef type of cattle to use? 

I am just as sure that we iiiusf select our drones of a honey 
gathering strain, as the breeder of fast horses selects the sire from 
a true racing strain. So does the breeder select his males from the 
greatest milking strains of cattle. And you will find that he takes 
as much pains and more in selecting the male than he does the 
females. 

The drone is the son of liis mother, and has no father direct. 
So we must select our drone mothers a year in^ advance, as the 
drone mother must have all the qualifications of our queen mothers 
as regards to honey gathering, and besides her drones must be 
perfect. 




fi h^ ^ .iitr^ 




.VjSii.: 



Sixty C the Cooper Yard, Working for Howe. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



183 




Forty Colonies in Emonds Yard Working for Howe. 

I have found that there is quite a variation in size, color, and 
their wings are often imperfect. Look well to their wings, and 
never use a queen that throws small workers or small drones. The 
cell has no influence with these queens, they are simply runt bees 
and will give you the same variation with perfect worker and drone 
cells. Do not use such a quee}i as a breeder. It is in the queen. 

INFIiUENCZ: THE SIZE OF CEI.!. HAS OIT BEES. 

Speaking" of the size of cell, I mean that certain queens produce 
large bees, drones and workers. Other queens produce small bees, 
a noticeable difference in size. Some claim that by using larger 
cells we would get larger bees. Xow take the colony that produces 
the largest bees, shake all the bees olt the combs and give or ex- 
change them with the colony that has the smallest bees. If you 
have some of those little black bees all the better. Shake all the 
bees off and exchange their combs. Now in six wrecks see the re- 
sults. You have the large bees where the combs of the small bees 
were, and the small bees hatched out of the same combs where the 
large bees were. It is in the race or strain and not in the combs. 

We all know that drones that hatch out of w^orker cells are 
runts or very inferior drones. So to get good drones we must let 
the bees build perfect drone combs, not use sagged or stretched 
foundation combs, for you would not get perfect males, from such 
cells. 



184 THE BEE-KEEPERo REVIEW 

In selecting my drones I put more stress on the way they leave 
the hive. It is just a streak is all that you can see; you could not 
set any color or hardly know it was a drone. This shows you per- 
fect wings and vigor as you can tell in no other way. Note the 
difference in the flight of your drones, and see how lazy some leave 
the hive. Now, don't jump to conclusions. A drone has to be at 
least ten days old or more before he will pay any attention to 
queens. So be sure you know that they are mature drones before 
you judge too hastily. 

ru&insHZNa sbone comb to conttroii tbe sbone fbodttction. 

After you select your drone mothers give them a plenty of drone 
comb near the center of the brood nest, and be sure to feed these 
colonies so there will be no let up on drone rearing. Bees will 
raise drones so keep a comb in every hive with 3x4 inches of drone 
comb. This satisfies them. You can keep it at one side of the hive 
and every twenty days pull out that comb and with an uncapping 
knife shave their heads oft". This is a short job and surely gets 
rid of all undesirable drones or the most of them. ,. 

Now these very best queens for honey, as I said before, are 
often poor queen mothers. Some of them are the very best drone 
mothers that you can get, so keep them as long as you can for 
that purpose. 

QUJSEN BEABING OB BAISHTG TaE VEBT BEST QTTBBN. 

In the first place the most of the literature on queen rearing 
says that a larvae two days old is just as good for a queen as the 
tgg. or even older than that some claim would do no liann. The 
late Henrv Alley always claimed that the best way was to cut the 
comb in strips and kill every other egg and we would get nice 
large queens every tinie, other things being equal. Had Air. Alley 
explained why, it would have saved me several years' testing out 
different methods to kiwzv zvhy. Dr. Phillips told me that a queen 
transferred when a larvae was just as good, if done properly. 

I would like to ask any one did you ever know a colony in a 
normal condition to use anything to rear a queen from but an eggt 
Not taking a larvae two or three days old, as they nnll do, if we 
take the queen azvay. 

After testing queens reared from larvre two days old, I found 
that she was good for one year, but not as good the second season 
and would be superseded sure the third season and some times the 
fall of the second season. The queens from larvae three days old 
were short-lived; would be superseded the second and sometimes 
the first season. 

{Coniiniud in June Xnnibcr) 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 185 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL. Managing Editor. 

Office — 230 AVoodland Ave., Detroit, Miciiigan. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit. Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1S79. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

DLscontinuanoes — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

Advertising' rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



It is the man, not the business, that succeeds. — W. Z. H. 



If the world doesn't suit vou it is ten to one that you don't suit 
the world.— W. Z. H. ' 

Talk, attempts to do something, are all well enough in their 
wav. but it is the man that docs tilings that we all admire. — A^^ 
Z. H. 



Old subscribers will be pleased to read a few editorials in this 
number signed "^^^ Z. 11." These were selected by one of the 
subscribers and sent to me some time ago. They are taken from 
old numbers of the Rfa-ii-:\v. 



That Grading Rules Discussion. 

Owing to the contril)uted articles and the amount of editorial 
matter made necessary by the recent change in management of the 
Review, the discussion on grading rules wnll have to lay over until 
the next issue. I regret this, as I am sure you would like to have 
its continuance without interruption. 



Sweet Clover. 

Bulletin Xo. 48.5. with the above title, written l\v J. M. West- 
gate and H. X. Vinall of the Bureau of Plant Industry, and pub- 
lished by the United States Government, can be obtained by writing 
the Secretary of Agriculture, ^^'ashington, D. C. When writing, 
if you will send along a list of your neighbors who would be inter- 



186 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

ested, a copy will be sent each of them also. I understand it is for 
free distribution, and should be a valualjle addition to everv bee- 
keeper's library, for sweet clover ranks as a splendid honey plant, 
and is something that farmers as a rule know but little about. 

I have also had the pleasure of reading a circular written by 
E. E. Barton, and published by the Bokahara Seed Co.. of Falmouth, 
Ky., which covers the subject thoroughly, and is well worthy the 
attention of anyone interested in this wonderful plant. This circu- 
lar can be had free bv addressing the above named firm. 



California Prospects. 

On January 13th. ]\lr. ^I. H. Alendleson wrote me that they were 
having a severe drought there, and that horses, cattle and sheep 
were suffering. In fact, many were in a starving condition. Since 
then I have received word that rains have arrived, and that the pros- 
pects now are good for a part of a crop at least, with prospects 
of an average crop if they get late rains. 



Historical Notes on The Causes of Bee Diseases. 

If you are at all interested in the "\\"hy" of l)ee diseases, you 
should send to the Bureau of Entomology, Department of Agricul- 
ture, Washington, D. C, for the book with the above title. It is 
compiled by Dr. E. F. Phillips and Dr. G. F. ^^dlite, and gives a 
comprehensive treatise on the work done by the various investi- 
gators wdiose papers are discussed in the book. It is for free distri- 
bution, and every bee-keeper should send for a copy. 



Winter Losses. 

The need of a proper system of gathering reports for the 
benefit of bee-keepers is again apparent. I might "guess" on the 
results of the past winter, but it would be only a guess after all. 
Reports are conflicting. Some report an almost total loss, while 
others have come through with hardly the loss of a colony. Indica- 
tions are that the loss in general has been heavy. 

But to get back to the need of a system. We get a report from 
a section which says "bees nearly all dead in this section.'' To 
what does he refer ; to those kept by the farmer bee-keeper, or to 
those belonging to the specialist? Sometimes the loss of the 
former is heavy while the latter, the one who really produces the 
honey which affects our markets, is very slight. Again, with but 
scattering reports it is hard to get the truth. AMiat we need is a 
SOLID report from the different sections, and this we will never 
get except through a definite system for gathering such reports. 

This is another work that can be taken up by the National, and 
I hope to see in the near future this very thing- done. AA'ith our 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 187 

crop report this }'ear we will be in a very good way to get a 
system started, which can be enlarged upon as time goes by. Too 
much must not be expected at the start, but every season will 
strengthen the system. \Mien bee-keepers realize the value to 
them of making these reports, then and not till then will the best 
results be obtained. 



Co-Operative Experiments in Bee-Keeping by Canadians. 

Canada, through her Provincial Apiarist, Morley Pettit, is con- 
ducting a series of co-operative experiments in bee-keeping. The 
plan is to first send out a circular announcing that certain experi- 
ments are to be made, and asking those who will tr}' them out 
according to the instructions given to fill out the blank sent them 
and return it to Mr. Pettit. 

Instructions are then sent for carrying out the experiment 
.^elected, together with a blank on which to make a full report in 
the fall. 

For 1912 the following experiments will be carried out: 1 — 
Alethod of prevention of natural swarming in extracted hone}^ pro- 
duction by holding the colony together. 2 — Alethod of prevention 
of natural swarming in comb honey production, by artificial shaken- 
swarming. 3 — ^Method of prevention of natural swarming by manip- 
ulation of hives instead of combs. 



Short Course in Bee-Keeping at Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

The annual short course in bee-keeping at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College is offered from May 29th to June 13th, 1912, 
to be concluded by a Convention and Field Day. The course and 
convention is under the personal direction of Dr. Burton N. Gates, 
in charge of the apicultural service of the College and State. 

The course includes lecture, laboratory, demonstrational, apiary 
and field work as well as excursions to large apiaries and queen 
rearing plants. The concluding convention should bring together a 
hundred or more representative apiarists of the East, beside the 
noted authorities and commercial men who appear on the program. 

The features of this convention will be lectures, demonstra- 
tions by authorities of national reputation, as well as displays by 
inventors, manufacturers, supply merchants, and queen rearers. 

A special invitation is extended to all bee-keepers to display and 
demonstrate inventions, implements or methods. If table space is 
desired, or special equipment is to be prepared, notice should be 
sent to Dr. Burton X. Gates, Amherst, ^lass., at least two or three 
weeks before the convention. The college will provide covered 
tables for the exhibit. 



188 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

It may l^e found necessary to limit the number of students in 
the course, yet applications are accepted in the order in which they 
are received. No Registration Fees will be Charged. Women are 
cordially invited to attend. 

Registration with the Extension Service, Alassachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, Amherst, ]\Jass., is necessary for admission to 
classes. 

Space will not permit us to give a detailed program, but that 
can be secured by addressing Dr. Burton N. Gates, Amherst, ^^lass. 



TO THE MEMBERS, EX-MEMBERS AND PROSPECTIVE 

MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' 

ASSOCIATION. 

Fellow Bee-Keepers axd Members: 

Your attention is called to the fact that the Directors of the 
National Bee-Keepers' Association have purchased the Bee-Keepers 
Review for the Association, to be used by them as an official organ. 
According to our contract, we take possession with the next, or 
June number, and we will continue to publish it monthly, as hereto- 
fore. 

Some changes in the makeup of the Review are already l)eing 
contemplated by the Board of Directors. The subscription price of 
one dollar per year will likely be adhered to as in the past. A pro- 
vision is already decided upon that present subscribers who are not 
members of the National can become members for the balance of 
1912, by paying the local association fee of 50 cents ; the dollar they 
have paid for the Review for this year being accepted in lieu of 
the dollar membership fee of the National. 

Arrangements are also made so that members that are uot sub- 
scribers of the Review, will be taken care of. The}' should write 
the Secretary for particulars. 

Our efficient Secretary, Mr. E. B. Tyrrell, has consented to 
remain with us as ^Managing Editor of the Review. It has about 
been decided by the directors to have a board of three editors, these 
two, aside from Mr. Tyrrell, having complete charge of all the 
manuscript that is published in the Re\'ie\v each month. 

The advantage of the board of three editors will be apparent 
to the members, inasmuch as it Avill make the Review broad in its 
dealings with the different problems of bee-keeping. In other words, 
it will not be a ''one man journal." 

'Most papers are edited by men who happen to have the money 
to buy someone out, or they may have been born in a family of 
publishers, thus become editors. The reader will see at a glance 
that such an editor mav make a (?ood one or otherwise. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 189 

Money cannot l)uy a position as Tlditor of our (nvn Ki':\'ie\v. 
To be eliiii^ible for this important ])osition one must be known as 
ha\'ing- the proper qualifications tt) make a good editor, or it would 
be hopeless for him to apply. The fact is, no one has applied for the 
position, and likely will not, but the directors will ask some ccmipe- 
tent persons to accept until the delegate meeting next February, 
Avhen they wall have the whole matter in their own hands to do as 
they see fit. 

( )ur Secretary tells me that one member when sending in his 
dollar and a half dues for membership in the National asks, 'what 
are the benefits?" This is a ])roper question to ask. AA'hat are 
the benefits to be derived by becoming a member of the National 
Bee-Keepers' Association? In the first place, we are going to try 
and give each member the Rt:\'ji:w a wdiole year for a dollar, and 
throw in the dollar membership fee lo the National for good 
measure. 

()f course you will have the •")U cents to pay for your momber- 
-■^hip in your local association. The manag;ement will try hard to 
make the Review worth the dollar you pay for it, so this will be 
a part of the benefits you will derive by becoming a member of 
the National Association. Then we are going to help all the mem- 
bers that need help in the selling of their crop of honey. This 
feature will certainly help some of the members enough so they 
will be even on the .")0c local association fee. We have made 
arrangements with the tin can manufacturers, so we can buy all 
kinds and sizes of tin packages at the lowest jobbing price. Note, 
1 said jobbing price, not wholesale. The price we get by buying in 
such large quantities, is considerabl}' less than your retail dealer 
can buy for, consequently our price is lower. Take the GO-lb. screw 
cap honey can for an illustration. We can sell them to the mem- 
bers at only (iOc per case of two cans, and at this price furnish 
them of heavier tin than the regular. Then there is the one- 
gallon screw cap tin can at only 7c each. Can't you begin to see 
where the benefits of becoming a member of the National Associa- 
tion come in? We are also making arrangements with the glass 
manufacturers, so we can furnish the members with their glass 
l^ackages for the retail trade at equally low ])rices as that on tin. 

bTom time to time we hoi)e to bring out other ec[ually good 
bargains for the members, so 1 think 1 can safely promise each 
member his dollar and a half worth each year, and in many cases 
much more. 

To work out all the "schemes" we are contemplating, we will 
have to have the support of the bee-keeping fraternity. We need 
a large membership — the larger the membership, the more the 
indi\i(lual will be benefited. Get your neighbor to join with you. 



190 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

tell him he will get his money's worth, and we hope a considerable 
more. Be a "pusher!"' With }-our help we hope to be 6,000 
strong by January 1st, 1914. Then take notice what we will do. 

E. D. TOWNSEXD, 

Chairman. 



Stand Up and Be a Man. 

^^'hen I was about seventeen years old I began the study of 
shorthand, or stenography, as it is now called. As a method of 
practice, I was quite given to jotting down my thoughts in short- 
hand in a note-book that I carried. In rummaging through a drawer 
the other day, I came across one of these old note-books, and, in 
glancing through its pages, my eye was caught by the title of one 
of the items. It was the same as the heading of this article. I had 
the curiosity to read it, and I consider the advice good enough to 
print, even if it were written by a boy in his teens. Here is what I 
then wrote : 

"How easy it is to stand up and be a man Avhen you have nO' 
troubles, when friends and fortune smile upon you, and success 
attends your every undertaking; l)Ut when troubles come thick and 
fast, one sorrow treading close upon the heels of another, when 
friends prove false and fortune frowns, and one hope after another 
is dashed to the ground, how hard it then is to stand up and be a 
man. 

But when is it that we most need to be strong, hopeful and 
courageous? Isn't it adversity's dark hour that most requires us to 
exercise our manly qualities? 

Do not cower before the network of difficulties, disappoint- 
ments, trials, and sorrows that you will surely meet in this world; 
meet them bravely, unravel the tangled threads, be resolute, per- 
severe, trust in God, stand up and be a man." 

As I look back over my past life I can not help thinking how 
manv times I have been called upon to follow the above advice; 
and how I have tried, to the l)est of my a])ilitv, to follow it. — AW 
Z. H. 



The Bee-Keepers' Review Has Been Sold. 

You Avill be surprised, and I believe pleased, to know that the 
Bee-Keepers' Review now belongs to the National Bee-Keepers" 
Association. This makes it the only journal on the American con- 
tinent absolutely owned and controlled by the bee-keepers them- 
selves. It gives them the means of building up and perfecting the 
most powerful bee-keeper's association in the world, and proves that 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 191 

the present Board of Directors of the National have the nerve to 
undertake a work of magnitude in behalf of their fellow-workers. 

You. as a subscriber, have a right to know just why this action 
was taken, and I will try, as best I can, to tell you. 

Most of you know that for over a year I have held the office 
of Secretary of the National Bee-Keepers" Association. Since the 
15th of last June I have also edited and published the Bee-Keepers' 
Review. Last November the constitution of the National was 
changed, which placed a much greater responsibility upon the Secre- 
tary, and consequently a great deal more work. 

It did not take me long to find out that a private business did 
not go well with a co-operative business. In other words, the 
work of the National and the v.-ork of the Review conflicted. I 
found that I was doing many things double, simply because they 
belonged to different lines of business. To explain, I may mention 
the fact that I just recently sent out a large number of circulars 
for the National. Those circulars solicited membership. If I de- 
sired to solicit those same persons for stibscriptions, it meant 
another set of circulars, sent by the same person, and paying post- 
age equal to the first lot, when all coidd have been combined in the 
same circular had the whole business been under the one owner- 
ship. 

Another point was, that after a person had been solicited for 
one thing, he would be apt to Idc iess responsive to a second appeal 
by the same person for another tliuv^. Hence, if the National circulars 
were sent out first, it was done at a loss to the Review, and if the 
Review circulars were sent out first it v.'as done at a loss to the 
National. In either case one or the other btisiness must suffer. 

Then there came the question of separating the office work. 
Letters had to he dictated, remittances had to be cared for. two 
sets of cards had to be kept, besides many other things. How nuicli 
of this work must be charged to the National, and how much to 
the Re\iew was always a question which demanded careful atten- 
tion, resulting in mcjre work. And most of this work vras unneces- 
sary if the whole business was under one ownership. 

Now take your last National report, and you will read on pages 
83, 8-1: and 8o a discussion regarding an official organ for the 
National. That shows wliich wav the wind blows, and that there 
is a demand for a National ])tiblication. Take any of the large 
organizations you can think of, and you will find that they have 
their official organ. It is really necessary in order that the mem- 
bers may be promptly informed regarding the work as it goes 
along. 

The question came up then as to how this official organ could 
be established. The postal laws were the first thing which had to 



192 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

1)6 considered. 1 took considerable time in looking this matter up, 
ha^■ing at one time the thought of establishing a separate publica- 
tion. I found that to do that and accept advertising I must have 
a subscription list. The National could not get up a journal and 
send it out free to its members, if it accepted advertising. No, a 
subscription list must be established. To get a subscription list 
would take more funds than the National had at its disposal. On 
the other hand, if a publication v/as issued without advertising, 
then the cost of its publication would l^e prohibiti\'e. This made 
the plan of starting a new publication out of the question, for the 
})resent at lease. 

Next came the suggestion of getting a page in some farm pub- 
lication and sending it free to the members. Here again we were 
up against the postal laws, for free circulation is not allowed. They 
must be subscribers. But even if that plan was adopted, it vrould 
not be practical, for we wciuld not have sufficient control to assure 
us that we would get what we wanted printed. 

Having exhausted all means for getting a new journal started 
and not seeing a way out, the next move w^as tc» get hold of one 
already started and naturally that Ijrouglit my attention to the 
Review. I will admit that 1 hesitated about offering it to the 
directors. I realized tha. I would no doubt be charged by some of 
having personal interests in getting rid of the Review. ]\Iany no 
doubt would think that I had got hold of a bad bargain and wanted 
to unload on the Association. In reply to this 1 will say that the 
Review is not an untried experiment. It has been published now 
for more than 24 years. I have been at the helm less than a year, 
and I feel that I have made good. At least the letters I can show 
from my subscribers would indicate that to be the fact, as well as 
the condition of my subscription list. You have noticed that I have 
not offered one single inducement for renewals or new subscribers, 
by giving a premium or discount (except the three months' trial 
offer for 15 cents), and practically all my old subscribers have re- 
newed for this year. I can be excused then for believing that the 
Review is on a prosperous basis. 

In selling the Review to the National Association, I feel that 
I have proven myself loyal to your cause. That act has placed me 
absolutely at your disposal. Whenever you feel that I am not 
working for your interests, whenever you think another person can 
represent you better, you have only to exercise your power, and 
another takes my place. Don't tell me there is no one else availa- 
ble. There is no man living whose place cannot he filled. The 
fact that you have created a job big enough to demand one man's 
attention will attract plenty of applicants. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 193 

At present 1 ha\'e been retained as A,lanaLiins4' JCditor. I hope 
to fill that position so satisfactorily to you, that it will be a long- 
time before you will want to change. 1 have ultimate faith in the 
possibilities of building up your organization to a point where it 
is a power for you. 1 hope to be retained long enough in my pres- 
ent position to ])ro\e to you that it can be done. And at the 
same time I realize that should this mo^'e be a failure, the heaviest 
loss and censure will fall on my shoulders. LUit I am not looking 
for failure. In fact, if you could look over the mail on my desk 
today ; if you could read the letters that lay there from Bee-Keepers' 
Associations that want to become branches of the National (and one 
of them from California) ; if you could look over the orders for cans, 
some as far away as Idaho and California; 1 say if you could read 
with me these thmgs you would share my enthusiasm, and feel as 
1 do that there is no possible chance of failure. 

And now I want to say a word to you regarding our directors. 
Up to the time of the directors" meeting in Detroit last January, 
1 had met (but one of the four directors who were present ; Director 
\\'ilcox, who was absent, 1 met at Minneapolis. 1 didn't know how 
they would back me up in my work, but 1 am frank to say that 
you could not have selected a more loyal lot of fellows. In spite 
of the fact that we started the new term with but $'28.09 in the 
general fund, those directors have not hesitated to undertake bis: 
things for you, and have proven themsehes progressives in every 
sense of the word. 1 cannot help but feel grateful to them for 
the backing they are giving me in my work, and the way they 
handle impartially every question which confronts them. Personal 
interests are thrown to the wind, and every question is considered 
from the standpoint of "what benefit will this be to the National 
Association." 

In mentioning the small balance on hand at the l^eginning of 
this year, I wish it distinctly understood that I cast no reflections 
on the former work of our general manager and treasurer, Mr. 
France, for I am certain you could not have found a person more" 
economical and conscientious in his work than Mr. France was. 

In conclusion, let me say that no hasty decision has been 
arrived at in the purchase of the Revif.w. The matter has been 
carefully considered from every standpoint, and the move was made 
with a full appreciation of the responsibilities resting on the 
shoulders of those who took the action. In tliis issue you have 
Chairman of Directors Townsend's statement, and in the next issue 
I hope to pu]:)lish a report from each of the other four directors. 
Readers, the action was taken in your behalf. Let us know that 
we have your support by the personal work that you can do in 
building the strongest organization of bee-keepers the world ever saw. 



194 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 




NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey 17c to 
18c. Light amber 16c. Amber 15c. Fancy 
white extracted 10c to lie. Light amber and 
amber extracted 8c to 9c. Wax 30c. 

BIAKE LEE CO., 
April 22. 4 Chatham Row. 



CINCINNATI— Market on comb honey is 
about cleaned up and there is a very light 
demand. It seems demand has fallen off con- 
siderably. White extracted in 60-pound cans 
at 10 cents, light amber in 60-pound cans at Syi 
cents, there is also a very light d^^mand for 
extracted. Beeswax fair demand at $33.00 per 
hundred. Above are selling prices, not what 
we are paying. 

April 17. C. H. WEBER & CO. 



KANSAS CITY— Our market is almost 
cleaned up on botli comb and extracted honey. 
There is no change in prices since our last 
quotations. We quote: No. 1 White Comb 
24 sec. cases, $3.25; No. 2 White Comb 24 sec. 
cases, $3.00; No. 1 Amber Comb 24 sec. cases. 
$3.00; No. 2 Amber Comb 24 sec. cases, $2.75; 
Extracted Amber per lb., 7K' to Sc; Extracted 
White per lb., 9c; Beeswa.x, 25c to 28c. 

April 22. C. C. CLE.MONS PRODUCE CO. 



DENVER — We have no comb honey to quote, 
our market is entirely cleaned up. Our job- 
•bing quotations on white extracted are 9c, 
light amber 8c, strained 6j4c to 7;/2C. We pay 
26c in cash and 28c in trade for clean, yel- 
low beeswax delivered here. 

THE COLORADO HONEY PRODUCERS' 

ASSN. 
Mar. 23. 



CHICAGO — The sales of honey during the 
month of April have been of small volume, 
hardly up to the normal of the past ten years. 
Prices for the A No. 1 to fancy grades of 
comb honey has held steadily at 17c to ISc 
per lb. but there was very little of it. The 
other grades range from Ic to 5c per lb. less. 
Dark and mixed comb, also those of irregular 
shape or built without separators have been 
difficult to dispose of at 10c to 12c per lb. 
Extracted honey remains fairly steady in price 
at from, 8c to 9c per lb. for the white grade, 
according to kind and duality with the ambers 
chiefly at 7c per lb. but some of the fine 



sages liave brought Sc per lb. There is quite 
a quantity of it being carried over despite the 
fact that we had a small flow in the neighbor- 
ing territories during 1911. Beeswax is in 
good deniand at from 30c to 32c per lb., ac- 
cording to color and cleanliness. 

.\pril 22. R. A. BURNETT & CO. 

173 -W. South Water St. 



TOLEDO — The market on honey is quiet as 
usual this time of the year, buyers only taking 
on from hand to mouth, and the stocks are 
well cleared up. Comb Honey sells as follows: 
No. 1 White Clover from 15 to 17c per lb. 
according to quality and condition; western 
honey from $3.40 to $3.75 per case; no de- 
mand for dark or off grades. Extracted honey 
moves slow at from 7^ to 8^4 for amber 
grades and 9i/2 to 10c for white honey. Bees- 
wax brings from 30 to 34c according to quality. 

April 29. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 



NEW YORK — Our market is practically bare 
of comb honey, so to speak. Some few little 
lots still arriving, which have been held back, 
and find ready sale at from 15c to 17c for the 
\yhite, and from 13c to 14c for amber and 
light amber, according to quality. Extracted 
honey still remains very quiet. The demand 
has not been up to former years, ever since 
the first of January, and we really see no in- 
dications for an improvement at this time. 
Prices remain nominally the same, with very 
little trade. W'e sanction fullv what Editor 
Root says in Gleanings of Bee Culture in 
April loth issue, entitled "Why Bee Keepers 
Should Produce jMore Comb Honey This 
Year." The Editor is right in what he says; 
it seems that too much extracted has been 
produced of late years, and not enough of 
comb. 

April 22. HILDRETII &• SEGELKEN. 



CINCINNATI.— The condition of _ the honev 
market reminds one of a ship that is beached, 
and must await the high tide to move it. It is 
useless to try to offer any inducements to make 
sales, and to cut prices, owing to the small 
profit, would not only be a loss but would ruin 
the conditions. Nevertheless, we do not over- 
look opportunities to make sales. For the 
fancy grades of table honey we are getting 
from 10c to lie a pound in 60-lb. cans, and 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



195 



for amber honey of the better grades from 
8c to 9c, while for the low grades from 6c to 
7c, according to the quality and quantity pur- 
chased. These are our selling prices: Comb 
honey is moving somewhat slower than for 
some time back, and we are now getting from 
$3.75 to $4.00 a case. For choice, bright yel- 
low beeswax, we are paying 30c a pound in 
cash, delivered here. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO. 
April 19. 51 Walnut street. 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 



o 



=o 



BEES AND QUEENS. 

^^'ANTED — Carload of bees for cash. John 
C. Bull, Rt. 8, Valparaiso, Ind. 



W.ANTED. — Carload of bees for cash. John 
C. Bull, Gen. Del., Hammond, Ind. 

Our Queens will please you. C. W. Phelps 
& Son, Dealers in Beekeepers' supplies, Bing- 
hampton, X. Y. 

Colonies of Italian Bees in L. hives, 10- 
fr., full of stores — any time. Jos. Wallrath, 
Antioch, Cal. 

For Sale. — Bees, queens and supplies. Pure- 
blooded poultry and eggs, way below standard 
prices. A. M. Applegate, Reynoldsville, Pa. 

Nutmeg Italian Queens, after June 1, $1.00. 
Circular. A. W. Yates, 3 Chapman St., Hart- 
ford, Ct. 

Front Line Italian Queens, well bred and 
hardy. After June 1st, 6 for $4.50. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. T. B. Hollopeter, Pentz, 
Pa. 

Choice Italian Queens, delivery beginning 
April 15. Untested, 75 cts. ; tested," $1.00. Ten 
years' experience in queen-rearing. Send your 
orders now. F. Hughes, Gillett, Ark. 

Queens. — Mott's strain of Italians and Car- 
niolans. Bees by pound, nuclei. 1 en-page list 
free. Plans for Introducing Queens, 15 cts.; 
How to Increase, 15 cts.; both, 25 cts. E. E. 
MoTT, Glenwood. Mich. 

Italian and Carnolan Queens — Nucleus and 
full colonies; bees by the pound; apiaries in- 
spected for brood diseases; bee supplies; write 
for circular. Frank M. Keith, 83>^ Florence 
St., Worcester, Mass. 

Quirin's famous improved Italian queens, 
nuclei, colonies, and bees by the pound, ready 

in May. Our stock is northern-bred and 

hardv; five yards wintered on summer stands 
in 1908 and 1909 without a single loss. For Wanted.- 

prices, send for circular. Quirin-the-Quee.v- wax. 
Breeder, Bellevue, O. 



Queens and Nuclei.- — A strain of Italians 
developed for honey-gathering ability. My en- 
tire time has been given to them for 12 years. 
W. D. Achord, Fitzpatrick, Bullock Co., Ala. 

Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 

Finest Quality of 3 band Italian queen, 
reared in the 59th latitude. Tested: Tune, 
$3.00; July, $2.50; Aug., $2.00. Breeder: tune, 
$6.00; July, $5.00; Aug., $4.00. Doz., 25% 
discount. Alexander Lundgren, 12 Tomte- 
bogatan, Stockholm, Sweden. 

For Sale. — Moore's strain and golden Italian 
queens, untested, $1.00; six, $5.00; twelve, $9.00. 
Carniolan, Banat, and Caucasian queens, select, 
$1.25; six, $6.00; twelve, $10.00. Tested, any 
kind, $1.50; six, $8.00. Choice breeders, $3.00. 
Circular free. W. H. Rails, Orange, Cal. 

For Sale — After May 15th, a few breeding 
queens of G. B. Howe stock, select mated to 
drones of a well built up comb honey strain of 
dark Italians, $5.00 each. Untested in June, 
$1.00 each, 6 for $5.00. D. G. Little, Hartley, 
Iowa. 

Golden Queens. — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, five 
and six band, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also 
nuclei and full colonies. Send for circular and 
price list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tested Italian Queens by return mail, $1.00 
each. Queens reared last fall and just in their 
prime. Safe arrival and satisfaction guaran- 
teed. Send for price list. J. W. K. Shaw & 
Co., Loreauville, La. 

If you wish the best of untested three- 
banded Italian queens send us your orders — 
75 cents each, $8.00 per dozen. Safe arrival 
and satisfaction. No order too small nor too 
large to receive our prompt attention. The 
Golden Rule Bee Co., Rt. 1, Box 103, River- 
side, Cal. 

Golden and 3-Banded Italians. — lested, $1 
each. 3 queens $2.75; 6 or more, 85c each. 
L^ntested, 75c each; 3 queens, $2; 6 or more, 
05c each. Bees per pound, $1. Nuclei, per 
frame, $1.25. (No disease here.) C. B. 
Bankston, Buffalo, Texas. 

For Sale. — Early Italian (Frofalcon) Queens. 
February and March deliveries for untested, 
$1.50 each; April, $1.25; Tested Queens, 50 
cents additional. Select tested, $1.00 extra. 
Breeders, prices upon application. Sweet Clo- 
ver and Alfalfa Seed. Send for prices. John 
C. Frohliger, Berkeley, Cal. 257-9 Market 
St., San Francisco. 



HONET AND WAX. 

For Sale. — Clover, basswood, alfalfa, sage or 
light amber fall honey. First-class stock put 
up in any sized cans. Send for price list. M. 
V. Facey. Preston, Fillmore Co., Minn. 



-Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
R. A. Burnett & Co., 
173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 



196 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. HiLDRETH & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

For Sale. — Water white and light-amber 
alfalfa and light-amber fall honey, put up in 
any size packages. First class. 

I)adant & Sons, Hamilton, 111. 



SEAIi ESTATE. 



For Sale. — Old homestead farm of los 
acres; good buildings; best farm in the neigh- 
borhood; $40 per acre. H. S. Thompson, 
Franklin Forks, Pa. 



MISCEIiIiANEOUS. 



For Sale — 1 ^ h. p. Associated Mfg. Co.'s 
gasoline-engine in good condition; $20.00 takes 
it. M. C. SiLSBEE, Rt. 3, Cohocton, N. Y. 

Wanted — Every bee-keeper to try Boyuni 
Foundation Fastener. See ad. on page 103 of 
this issue. 

For Sale — Ten-frame hives, etc., used and 
new. Wanted, to buy or exchange old bee 
journals. Send list with jirices. Edwin Ewell, 
Litchfield, Mich. 

Second-Hand 8-frame hives, practically as 
good as new; painted white; IJ^-story; com- 
plete with starters, $1.25 each, worth $2. .50. 
O. N. Baldwin, Baxter Springs, Kansas. 

For Sale. — Vogeler process comb founda- 
tion, 10 frame redwood hive bodies 25c each, 
and poultry supplies. J. Stansfield, Fruitvale, 
Calif. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 

For Sale. — Empty second-hand 60-lb. cans, 
as good as new, two cans to a case, at 25 cts. 
per case. C. H. W. Weber & Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 

Penna. Bee Keepers: Having bought supply 
business of Geo. H. Rea, can furnish complete 
line of Roots goods. Full car just in; catalog 
free. Thos. H. Litz, Osceola Mills, Pa. 

Free. — Catalogue of Bee-keepers and Poul- 
try supplies, describing our goods. Also of 
Barred and White Plymouth and White Wyan- 
dotte chickens. Best of goods. Lowest price. 
Square treatment. Prompt shipment. H. S. 
DuBY, St. Anne, 111. 

For Sale. — A brand-new Kenmore automo- 
bile, used only for demonstrating. Can be used 
for delivery or pleasure car. Will sell at a bar- 
gain. Louis Werner, Edwardsville, 111. 

Honey Cans for Sale — 5-gallon, 60-lb., 
.square, screw top cans, used only once; good 
as new; in crates; send quick best cash offer; 
any number delivered. Hilltop Pure Food 
Co., Ltd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

For Sale — 80 L combs, 7c each; 40 shallow 
ex, combs, 6c; 20 L hive bodies, 20c; 7 shal- 
low supers, 15c; 10 bottoms, 8c; 10 covers, 
12c; 32 L frames, 3c; second-hand but good; 
$12 cash for the lot. H. L. Hutchinson, May- 
ville, Mich. 

In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton, Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 



FOUI^TB'S'. 



Sicilian Buttercups — Eggs for hatching; 
circular free. 11. S. Durall, Hurdland, Mo. 

Partridge Wyandottes. — Adapted to any 
climate; eggs and stock for sale. C. M. AIyers, 
Winchester, Ind. 

Indian Runner Ducks, dark fawn, hardy, 
great foragers, heavy layers, pure white eggs 
15 for $1.00; 100, $5.00. Wm. StuMxM, Edin- 
burg. 111. 

Pigeons! Pigeons! — Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
our specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Prize-winning S. C. R. I. Reds, thorough- 
bred White Orpington, Barred Plymouth Rocks, 
Indian Runner ducks, fawn and white; white 
egg strain; eggs. Day old ducks. David M. 
Ha.mmond, Woodside Poultry Yards, Rt. 5, 
Cortland, N. Y. 

Real Bargains — In Stock 2-lb. pullets, chicks, 
eggs; heavy laying barred rocks, S. C. R. I. 
Reds, S. C. White Leghorns, Pekin Ducks; the 
kind we all want; don't go on a strike all 
winter; catalog free. Crystal Spring Farm, 
Rt. 2, Lititz, Pa. 

Eggs — From Houdans, Buff P. Rocks, White 
Wyandottes, Buff and Black Orpingtons, Buff 
Leghorns, R. C. B. Leghorns, R. I. Reds; eggs 
$1.50 per 15, $2.75 per 30, $4.00 per 45; 
Bronze Turkeys' eggs, $2.50 per 11. $4.50 per 
22. .\ddress A. F. Firestone, Broadwell, 
Ohio, Athens Co. 

I have the typical Indian Runner Ducks. 
They are the queen of all layers and as far as 
beauty the artist's brush has never surpassed. 
They stand pre-eminently of today. My foun- 
dation stock are from the original winners of 
the Jamestown Exposition. 13 pure white eggs 
$].nO; $7.00 per 100. Satisfaction guaranteed 
or money refunded. This advertisement will 
be lived up to to the letter. Robt. Bird, Pinck- 
neyville. 111. 

For .Sale — One hundred hives of bees, in 
lots to suit purchasers, at ten dollars per hive. 
Colonies strong and healthy. .Address W. S. 
Frazeur, Sr., 259 City Market; Indianapolis. 
Ind. 

One of the handsomest, as well as 
the most instructive calendars we have 
seen for this year, is that sent out hy 
the White & Wyckoff Manufacturing 
Company, manufacturers of "Autocrat" 
and Exclusive Correspondence Station- 
ery, Holyoke, Mass. The large type, 
the featuring of holidays and notable 
days of the year, in three-color process 
printing, makes the calendar a most 
desirable one. A calendar will be 
mailed upon receipt of 10 cents in coin 
or U. S. stamps. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



197 



WANTED 
WHITE HONEY 



Both comb and extracted. Write 

us before disposing of 

your crop. 



HILDRETH & SEGELKEN 

265-267 Greenwich St. 

New York, N. Y. 

Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

Bright, Powerful. Economical. 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in your home. If your 
dealer hasn't got them, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
manv as you want at 25c each. 
AGENTS WANTED EVERY- 

^hI^steel mantle light CO. 

K3'3 Huron St.. Toledo, O. 




Established 1SS5 
WE CARRY AN UP-TO-DATE LINE OF 

Bee-keepers' Supplies 

W'rite for our 50-page catalog 
free, and for lowest prices on 
supplies. Full Information 

given to all inquiries. We 
handle the best make of goods 
for the be€-keeper. 

Freight facilities good. Let 
us hear from you. 

•Tohn Xebel & Son Supply Co., High Hill, Mo. 




LAKNlULAIlS Daring Spring Months 

of any race of bees. This is of 
immense importance. Bees must 
be gotten strong early. Success 
in Honey production can come 
only by haringr colonies strong 
when harvest opens. Ask inr 
"Superiority of the Carniolan 
giving full description, prices of 
etc. It's free. 

ALBERT G. HANX 
Scientific Queen Breeder, Pittstown, N. .1. 




American Butter & Cheese 
Co., 

31-33 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 

Always in the market for choice 
comb honey. Write us. 

SWEET CLOVER 

Seed, for winter sowing on top ground. 

Circular how to grow it free. 

Bokhara Seed Co., Box 296-C, 

Falmouth, Ky. 



GOLDEN ITALIAN BEES 

"Buttercup Strain." 
Queens, Xuelei and Full Colonics. 

I have kept and studied Bees for fifty years. 
Have bought queens for improvement of stocli 
from the most noted breeders from Langstroth 
down to the present day. 

My foundation stock, from which my im- 
proved "Buttercup" strain was evolved, was 
originally from Alley and Pratt (Swarthmore). 

They are very gentle, very handsome, very 
hardy and great hustlers. I wintered 75 colon- 
ies on summer stands, last winter, one of the 
hardest on record. 

-Made more honey per colony last (very poor) 
season than ever before. Have no trace of 
disease. 

This season I shall propagate and offer for 
Bale after June 1st as follows: 

Prices of Bee.s and Q,neen.s: 

One full colony in lYz story, S-frame 

hive, complete $10.00 

One full colony. 8-framcs. one-story, only S.25 

Xucleu.s of Bees in lijibt shiiipiu;;- cases 
after June 1st. 

One-frame nucleus and untested queen. . . .$2.-30 
Two-frame nucleus and untested queen... 3.00 
Three-frame nucleus and untested queen.. 3. .50 
Colony or nucleus with tested queen, add. 1.00 

Queens. 

After June 1 

Selected tested queen $2.50 

Tested queen 1.50 

Untested queen j .00 

The colonies I offer consist of eight frames 
of bees, honey and brood, in a ten-frame 
Langstroth body. 

They will be securely packed and sent by 
express at purchaser's expense. 

For larger quantities of bees or queens write 
for prices. Circular free. 

ISAAC F. TILLINGHAST 

State Apiary Inspector, 
Factoryville, Pa. 



MEXICO AS 
A BEE COUNTRY 

B. A. Hadsell, one of the largest bee-keepers 
in the world, has made six trips to Mexico, 
investigating that country as a bee country, 
and is so infatuated with it that he is closing 
out his bees in Arizona. He has been to great 
expense in getting up a finely illustrated 32- 
page booklet describing the tropics of Mexico 
as a Bee Man's Paradise, which is also su- 
perior as a farming, stock raising and fruit 
country, where mercury ranges between 55 
and 98. Frost and sun-stroke is unknown. 
Also a great health resort. He will mail this 
book free by addressing 

B. A. HADSELL, Lititz, Pa. 

Italian, Cyprian, Carniolan, Caucasian and 
Banat Queens. Bee Supplies. Honey Packages. 
\VAI>TER C. MORRIS, 
74 Cortlandt St., 

Neiv York Clfy. 2V. V. 



198 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




LET SHAFER 

PUT DOLLARS IN 

YOUR HANDS 




Profits in dollars is what you want — now we're botli interested in becoming ''Top Notch- 

ers" in selling our honey — the protit is in selling rijirht. Sold mine for 25c per 

section for 1911 and each sale took 4 sections. You can sell 4 or more as 

easy as one. 

Send 2oc (coin) for postage and packing, for complete sample and my successful selling 

plan to 
W. S. SHAFER, Dept. K., 2311 N. Street, South Omaha, Nebraska. 



Carniolan Alpine Queens — Gray Workers 

SELECT TESTED QUEENS, March, April, May, $5.00; 

June, July, August, $3.50. 
SELECT UNTESTED, June, July, August, $2.00. 

Shipped to all parts of the world, postage free. Safe arrival guaranteed. Inter- 
national money order with every order. Dead queens replaced if returned in 24 hours 
after arrival. References respective financial and commercial responsibility of the under- 
signed Association can be had at every Imperial-Royal Austro-Hungarian Consulate in 
the U. S. and Canada. Write for our booklet. Orders for nuclei and hives cannot be 
filled until everything concerning this line of business is arranged properly. 

Remit money order and write English to the 

Imperial -Royal Agricultural Assocation 

Ljubljana, Carniola (Krain) 
AUSTRIA 



W. H. Laws 

will be ready to take care of your queen 
orders, whether large or small, the coming 
season. Twenty-five years of careful breed- 
ing brings Laws' qvieens above the usual 
standard; better let us book your orders 
now. 

Tested queens in March; untested, after 
April 1st. About 50 first-class breeding- 
queens ready at any date. 

Prices: Tested, $1.25; 5 for $5.00; Breed- 
ers, each $5.00. Address 

W'. H. I.a^vs, Beeville, Texas. 




At Last — A Comfortable Motorcycle 

The Ful-Floteing seat on the new 
Harley-Davklson Motorcycle eliminates 
jolts,. iars and all vibrations. The Free- 
wheel Control, another exclusive fea- 
ture makes It possible to start the 
Harley-Davidson like an automobile, 
without pedallngor running alongside 
to start motor. Write for catalog. 
Harley-Davidson Motor Co., 344 A St., Milwaukee 



PORTER BEE ESCAPE 




SAVES 
TIME HONEY MONEY 

l.'e eaeli, $1.05 iloz. All Dealers. 

>Iamifactured only by 

R. A 1-:. t. PORTER, Lewistown, 111, 

Bargains in Bee Supplies. 

The recent death of James Ileddon leaves 
us with a large amount of P>ee Fixtures and 
Sup]ilies of almost every description, which 
will be sold at a great sacrifice. Write us for 
inventory and write at once, as these goods 
will not last long at the prices we are closing 
them out at. 

JAMES HEnnox'.s soxs, 
Dowa^'ine, .llieliij^an. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



199 



AQUASUN 

Is produced from honey by re?>olving 
its electro-magnetic elements into acid. 

Aquasun is produced from the same 
elements as electric light, heat and 
power. 

Electric light, heat. etc.. are acids 
which result from abnormal tempera- 
tures. 

Aquasun is the only product of the 
only normal temperature. 

Normal temperature produces normal 
acid. 

Food stored or produced in abnormal 
temperatures produces abnormal acids. 

Abnormal acids produce almormal 
conditions in the body and disease is 
the result. 

The normal acid of Aquasun destroys 
the abnormal acids which produce dis- 
ease. 

Aquasun penetrates to every part of 
the system and is attracted toward dis- 
ease producing acids. 

No other substance besides hone\' can 
produce acid as in Aquasun. 

Aquasun resolves water into hydro- 
gen and uses it as a solvent in diges- 
tion. 

Abnormal acids use oils as solvents 
and overload the system with carbon- 
ates. 

Carl)onates harden, calcify and granu- 
late and produce inactivity and prema- 
ture old age. 

Hydrogen dissolves calcium-carbon- 
ates and produce youth fulness and pro- 
longs life. 
C. W. DAYTON, Chatsworth, Calif. 

Patent Arowed on Aquasun. 



SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufadturing Sections. 

^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 



National Bee -Keepers' 
Association 



OBJECTS OF THE ASSOCIATION 



The objects of this Association shall be to 
aid its members in the bttsiness of bee-keeping; 
to help in the sale of their honey and beeswax, 
and to promote the interests of bee-keepers in 
any other direction decided upon by the Board 
of Directors. 



OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

President — Ceo. W. York, Chicago. III. 
Vice-Pres.— Morley Pettit, Guelph, Ont. 
Secretary — E. B. Tyrrell, Detroit, Mich. 
Treas.-Cen'l Mgr. — N. E. France, Plattsville, 
Wis. 

DIRECTORS. 

E. D. Townsend, Remus, Mich, 
Wesley l-'oster, Boulder. Colo. 

F. Wilcox, Mauston. Wis. 

T. E. Crane, Middlebury, Vt. 

T. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn, 



Annual Membership $1.50, one-third, or 50 
cents of which goes to the local branch where 
such branch is organized. Send dues to the 
Secretary. 



USE THIS COUPON 



M. H. HINT & SON 

(Jeneral Agents for Root's Goods 
Lansing:, Mich. 

Dear Sirs:- — - 

Please quote me your prices on the at- 
tached list of bee supplies 1 need. Also 
send me your 64-page catalog, and a 
complimentary copy of "The Bee Keeper 
and The Fruit Grower." 



Address. 



CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 

in 

Honey, Beesi^ax, Maple Sugar and 

Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 



200 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



When You Buy Lewis Beeware 
You Get... 



IjEWIS (lUALilTV — Which means that all Lewis Hives are made out of clear white 
pine, and Lewis sections made out of fine bright basswood. The material in these 
goods is the best obtainable and selected by experts. 

LEWIS AVORKMANSHIP — The Lewis factory is equipped with the latest improved 
machinery constantly watched over by experts. The Lewis head mechanic has 
had thirty-five years of bee supply experience, the superintendent of bee hive de- 
partment twenty-nine years, the superintendent of sections twenty-eight years. 
These and many other skilled men have a hand in all the Lewis goods you buy. 

LEWIS PACKING — All Lewis Beeware is carefully and accurately packed — a patent 
woven wood and wire package made only by the Lewis Company, is employed largely 
in packing — this makes the package light, compact and damage-proof. 

LEWIS SERVICE — Years ago all goods were shipped direct from the factory with 
attending high freight rates and delays during the honey season — now Lewis Bee- 
ware can be obtained almost at your own door. Over thirty distributing houses 
carrying Lewis r>eeware by the carload are dotted all over the L'nitcd States and 
foreign countries. \\'ritc for the name of the one nearest you. 

G. B. LEWIS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Beeware WATERTOWN, WIS. 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 

" SAWS 

in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F..& JNO. BARNES CO. 

384 Ruby Street, Rockford, Illinois. 




"If goods are wanted quick, send to Pouder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
My equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 
excelled. 

PAPER HONEY JARS 

For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis.lnd. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 



The 

National Bee -Keepers' Association 




WILL FURNISH YOU 



Quality Cans 

At Wholesale Prices. Standard Sizes. 

Here we are with a standard can. Something you 
have never liad before. Of course, you had .-iixty- 
jiuund cans, but did you ever know what size those 
cans would be, what weight of tin they were made 
of, or what kind of a box they would be placed in 
for shipment? Of course, you didn't. You simply 
had to order sixty-pound cans and take what you got. 
Sometimes you did not get a very good can. Some- 
times the box was not strong enough to stand ship- 
ment without breakage. Sometimes you paid a big 
price for those cheap cans in the loss of honey you 
sustained through leakage. 

All Cans are carefully soldered and tested with 
compressed air under water to prevent the possible 
shipment of leakers. 

NN'cight of Tin used on above Cans to be not less 
tlian ]()il lbs. per base box of 112 sheets 14x20 inches. 

NOTE THE INNER SEAL 

Under the present pure food laws, if you ship your honey from one State to another, 
you must guarantee its purity. With nothing but a screw cap on your cans, how do you 
know your honey would rot be tampered with after it, left you and before it reached 'the 
buyer? We are furnishing you this year a can having an inner seal. This inner seal costs 
you nothing extra and can be used or not. If used, it does not interfere with the regular 
screw cap, but when once in place it cannot be removed without destroying it. This prevents 
your honey being tampered with without detection, for, of course, after the inner seal is 
destroyed the buyer will know it is not as it left you. Thisi certainly is an important con- 
sideration, and is furnished free on all cans ordered through the National Association. 





Send for circular giving prices, freight rates and full description to The NATIONAIi 
BEE-KEEFEBS' ASSOdATIOK, 230 WOOSI.AN]) AVE., DETROIT, MICHIGAN 




ROOTS 

BEEXEEPERS 
SUPPLIES 




You may have a catalog of supplies; but if you haven't ours for 1912 you have missed 
something really worth vi'hile, and should get one at once. It is the largest and most complete 
ever published — more than a mere price list of supplies — a book that every beekeeper can read 
with pleasure and profit. Beginners will find answers to many perplexing questions, and ad- 
vanced beekeepers timely suggestions that will save them money. Old customers are writing us 
frequently letters like the following: 

Your catalog for 1912, designated ROOT'S BEEKEEPERS' SUPPLIES, is received, 
and 1 certainly thank you for this book. I have had your catalog on my desk for 
years, and have used Root's supplies all along. I note the enlargement and improve- 
ment in your new catalog, and notice many things I expect to add to my apiary. 

Crystal City, Texas. C. W. Co.x. 

Our catalog this season also gives a full and complete list of books and booklets which we 
can supply. Many of these booklets are free, which doesn't mean that they are not worth read- 
ing, but simply that we want you to be informed on the subjects of which they treat. Send for a 
catalog, and check those in which you are interested. 



Quick Deliveries 



Next to having the best goods made, there is nothing so important to tlie beekeeper in the 
busy season as to have goods delivered just when they are wanted most. It isn't always possible 
to ship goods from a distant factory and have them reach destination within a day or two, as 
is sometimes necessary during the height of the season, but with distributing-houses located in 
the large shipping-centers we are able to supply beekeepers everywhere, with no loss of time 
and with minimum transportation charges. 



Send Your Hurry Orders 



to any one of the offices listed below, and let us show you what we can do for you in point of 
service. Cars are going to these branches at the rate of two or three a week, so the stocks are 
new and fresh, and we usually have just what you want. If it isn't in stock at your nearest 
branch our manager will include your order with his specifications and you may have your goods 
come in the next car, thereby saving on transportation charges and getting the goods in better 
shape than you would by local freight. 



Whatever Your Wants 



we can supply you, and, of course, there is no question about the quality of our goods. The 
name "ROOT" in connection with bee-supplies means the best of every thing in this line, and 
the best is always the cheapest, as our customers will testify. If you have never used our 
supplies you should make a trial of them this season. Once used, we are sure you will want 
no other. 

I have just received my goods, order No. 10,739. I am more than pleased with 
them. I had intended to make my hives, but when I received the sample hive and saw 
the No. 1 pine lumber from which it was made, and considering the workmanship, I am 
satisfied I can buy cheaper than I can make them; enough cheaper to save the price of 
the lumber. O. C. Mills, Barton Ldg., Vt. 

BRANCH OFFICES 
THew "york, 139-141 Franklin St. Cliicag-o, 213-231 Institute Flace 

Philadelphia, 8-10 Vine St. Des Moines, 565 W. Seventh St. 

St. Paul, 1024 Mississippi St. Syracuse, ^631 Genesee St. 

Wasliing-ton, 1100 Maryland Ave. S-W. 
Mechanic Falls, Maine 




Distributing" Depots in Many 
Large Centers 

The A. I. Root Company 

Executive Offices and Factory 

MEDINA, OHIO 




THE CHAS. F. MAY CO.. PRINTERS. DETROIT. MICK 




%t^wi^tr^' 




mm 



Published Mont% 




JUNE 
1912 

DETROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 



This Big Touring Car $1600 

Completely Equipped 



A classy big" car — tliat will fairly fly over the roads. De- 
slg'ned for the utmost comfort and attractiveness. Five 
passenger capacity. 




SEI.F-STABTEB, TOO. 



^ The special features of the Cartercar make this the best 
popular priced touring car value on the market. It has the 
patented Friction Transmission which makes it far superior 
to any gear driven car from an efficiency standpoint. It 
will climb a 50% grade — has any number of speeds — one 
lever control — no jerks or jars — and without the usual gears. 
C| Four other excellent models. They are every one lead- 
ers in their class. Full floating rear axle, valve encased 
motor, three quarter rear elliptic springs, and all modern 
ideas. Let us send you catalog. 

Cartercar Company 

Pontiac, Michigan 

BRANCHES: NEW VOBK, CHICACrO, DETROIT, KANSAS CITV. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 



201 



Do you LiKe 
to be Stung' ? 

What's the use of wearing an old 
style net bee-veil that blows in j'our 
e3'es, stick -5 to your face, and gives the 
bees a chance to hand you a hot one ? 

The Muth Ideal Bee Veil 

(75 CENTS, POvSTPAID, 70 CENTS 
WITH OTHER GOODS ; 

keeps the bees at a distance because it is 
made of light indestructible wire and 
Strong cloth. You can see through this wire as if it wasn't there; and 
you can smoke inside the veil all you want. It can't catch fire. 

If you buy the has-been kind of veils 

You certainly ARE "Stung"! 

lyook what dollars of satisfaction you get out of it ! No doubt about 
this — it's the best-ever veil on the market. 

Better send for one today — don't be a drone! 

We're big people in all bee supplies — ask for catalogue. 

^he Fred W. Muth Co. 




THE BUSY BEE, MEN, 



51 Walnut Street, 



Cincinnati. Ohio. 




HAND 

WILL 
LOOK 
• LIKE 
THIS 



Shafer's System 
Spells Success 

BECAUSE 




It's Modern, It's Clean, It's Sanitary, It's Attractive 

You can increase your profits from 3c to 5c per section, as well as your sales. 

You will sell more on each sale — 4 to 1. Sold entire 1911 crop for 25c 

per section. Try my plan this year. Send for complete 

FREE sample of successful selling plan to 

V^. S. SHAFER, Dept. R, 23 1 1 N Street, South Omaha, Nebr. 



CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 
in 

Honey, BeesTta:*^, Maple Sugar and 
Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 



American Butter & Cheese 
Co., 

31-33 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 

Always in the market for choice 
comb honey. Write us. 



202 



THE BEE-KEFPERS' REVIEW 




THE CHARMS 




OUR SUMMER SEAS 



Spend your vacation on the Great Lakes, the most economical and enjoyable outing in America. 
WHERE YOU CAN GO 
Daily service is operated between Detroit and Cleveland, Detroit and Buffalo; four trips 
weekly between Toledo, Detroit. Mackinac Island and way ports; daily service between 
Toledo, Cleveland and Put-in-Bay. During July and August, two boats out of Cleveland and 
Detroit, every Saturday and Sunday night. 

A Cleveland to Mackinac special steamer will be operated two trips weekly from June tSth to 
September 10th. stopping only at Detroit every trip and Goderich, Ont., every other trip. 
Railroad Tickets Available on Steamers. Special Day Trips Between 
Detroit and Cleveland, During July and August. 

Send 2 cent stamp for Illustrated Pamphlet and Great Lakes Map. 
Address: L. G. Lewis, G. P. A., Detroit, Mich. 
Philip H. McMillan. Pres. A. A. Schantz. Gen'l Mgr. 

Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company 




Tlie season has opened up more favorably, after all. than many beekeepers anticip-Tted. 
and many find themselves unprepared for the swarming period and honey-flow which is 
just before them. Extra hives just now mean almost a double output of honey, and we 
can get these hives to you at once. We have a large and complete slock of all kinds and 
combinations, and can fill your order th^ day it is received. 

If you are producing comb honey the Danzenbaker hive will give you most excellent 
satisfaction. Reports from large users of this hive show that with it a very large percent- 
age of fancy comb honey may be produced: and with a little extra protection it is an 
excellent wintering hive. 



■d 



.\nothcr comb-honey hive that is very popular this season is the Buckey; double-wallcc 
hive. This is the new moveable-bottom pattern, and the double-wall feature offers protec- 
tion, not only in the winter, but at all seasons. This is particularly valuable in the early 
part of the season when sudden changes of temperature are apt to have disastrous results. 

For Ihe iiroduction of extracted honey there is no better hive than the regular ten- 
frame dovetailed pattern. This has been a standard for years, and will admit of a number 
of changes and combinations to suit local conditions and the season. 



We have also, of course, our usual stock of all other supplies, and can handle^ your 
order for any item listed in our catalog with our usual promptness and dispatch. We are 
better e(|uipped than any other dealer in this section to give special attention to hurry 
orders, and solicit a trial of our goods and our service. 



C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 



2 1 46 Central Ave. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



203 



IP BEES COULD TALK 

They Would Say : 

"GIVE as 

'Dadant's Foundation' 



IT'S CLEAN, IT'S PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES " 



If you are not using "DADANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DADANT & SON S, ^^1'.^^'^?: 
A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 




BINGHAM SMOKERS 

Insist on Old Reliable Bingham Bee Smokers; for sale by all 
dealers in bee-keepers' supplies. For over 30 years the standard 
in all "countries. The smoker with a valve in the bellows, 
direct draft, bent cap, inverted bellows and soot-burning device. 

Smoke Engine, 4-inch each $1.25; mail, $1.50 

Doctor, 3^-inch each .85; mail, 1.10 

Conquerer, 3-inch each .75; mail, 1.00 

Little Wonder, 2-inch each .50; mail, .65 

Honey Knife each .70 ; mail, .80 

3Iainifacture«l only by 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

Graud Raiiid.s, Mirli. 



Protection Hive 

The best and lowest price hive on the market. This 
hive has % material in the outer wall, and is not 
cheaply made of ^ material like some other hives on 
the market. Send for circular showing 13 large illus- 
trations. It will pay you to investigate. 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MlCll. 




204 



THE BEE-KEEPERS REVIEW 




Milt P^^-P^^p^^ra' 3^$ii«ttt 

(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSOCIATION 

Office OF Pu BLicATiON - - - 230 Woodlan d Aven u e 

VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, JUNE 1, 1912. No. 6. 

Breeding and Inbreeding Bees. 

D. STAD. MENHALL. 

-•Jl^ EAR MR. TYRRELL: I thank you for the ^larch Review- 
JZI/ it is just simply fine. I must tell Air. Howe how I would 
inbreed bees, at the same time first bringing out one or two 
other points that may be of interest to others. 

FOUNDATION FOK STSAIN OF BEES. 

Suppose I have only two colonies, one with a pure Italian 
queen, which we will call colony A, the other colony B, with a black 
queen that gave 200 pounds of honey, and I wish to establish an 
apiary combining the honey-gathering' traits of both colonies. 

In the spring I would feed them coiitinua'ly until a flow. Just 
as soon as possible I would give colony B two frames of drone comb 
and remove queen from colony A, allowing it to mature one queen 
cell (really ten — I say one because I think I will be better under- 
stood) in time to mate with drones from B. 

Note right here this virgin is capable of transmitting all the 
working traits — blood — of colony A. if she could lay worker eggs 
before mating, but after mating her workers will have only half 
the blood, etc., of colony A and half — not of colony B — ^but of drones 
from colony B, the father of which we know nothing of. but we do 
know positively that these drones can not transmit all the w^orking 
traits, etc., of colony B. Therefore, our queen might as well have 
mated with a drone in Africa so far as combining the working traits, 
etc., of both colonies. Parthenogenesis with a vengeance — mavbe ! 
(Truly a blessing in disguise for the bee-keeper, as I will show — 



206 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

disguised because of our ignorance.) I dare say here is where Dr. 
Miller "falls down" in building up a non-swarming strain, and where 
we all do in trying to improve our bees. 

SETTING PARTHENOGENESIS ASIDE! 

Now just as soon as our hybrid queen is laying in colony A, 
we will give her two frames of drone comb and at the proper time 
remove the black queen from colony B, letting this colony mature 
ten queen cells to be distributed to as many nuclei to be mated with 
drones from hybrid queen in A. 

Remember, these drones are pure Italians, capable of trans- 
mitting all the working traits and blood of the Italian queen that 
gave us the original workers that stored 200 pounds, etc. Also, the 
same holds good with the ten black virgins, in regard to blood, etc., 
of colony B, that we mate to these drones, giving us ten nuclei 
whose queens positively have only the blood of the original two, 
colony A and B, combined. 

Colony A and B should now be broken up and their queens 
destroyed. Of course, the results would be the same if both colonies 
had been Italians. 

The real work of building up a good working strain of bees 
commences at this point and the bee-keeper that undertakes it 
should be thoroughly conversant with authoritative work on breed- 
ing and inbreeding. 

HOW TO IN-BREED BEES. 

\\"e w'ill use one colony this time. No. 1, with pure Italian 
queens. Remove the queen as soon as practical, taking good care 
of her, allowing the now queenless colony to mature one queen cell 
(more, of course, etc.) to be placed in nucleus to mate with any 
kind of a drone — it matters not — promptly returning the queen to 
the hive as soon as we remove the qtieen cells to nucleus, which we 
will call queen and hive No. 2. Now, we want drones, drones quick, 
from this newly mated queen No. 2, and if you think this a small 
problem, just try it! Could have made a drone layer of her in the 
beginning, but some question the advisability of this; so we will 
try the only plan I know — a plan I do not believe can be improved 
for the purpose it was intended, rapid increase, etc., or forcing a 
newly mated queen to lay drone eggs: 

Prepare a hive by placing a frame of empty worker comb or 
foundation in the center, a frame of hatching brood on each side, 
and on each side of hatching" brood a division board feeder, one 
filled with syrup and the other with damp sugar, placing our queen 
No. 2 and bees into this prepared hive. As soon as the middle 
frame is full of eggs and larvae, remove, placing another in its place. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 207 

continuing to do this for at least two weeks. Astonishing the num- 
ber of eggs a queen will lay in a short time under the above 
conditions. We owe Air. Simmins a vote of thanks for this plan, 
which is fully explained by Mr. A. C. Miller, American Bee-Keeper 
(now suspended), 1908, page ITO. 

At the end of two weeks remove the feeders, fill hive with 
frames of hatching brood, placing two frames of drone comb in 
same and I assure you we will have drones. 

At the proper time remove queen from hive No. 1, allowing 
them to mature ten queen cells, distributing these cells to as many 
nuclei to be mated to drones from No. 2. The mother of these 
drones is not only a full-blooded sister to the ten virgins, blood for 
blood, so to speak, but her drones are of the same identical blood, as 
they are not affected by her mating, therefore, from man's stand- 
point of kinship, we are mating aunts to nephews, but. as an actual 
fact we are mating full blooded brothers and sisters — the same blood 
— inbreeding. 

If any doubt this is inbreeding, let them take one colony, 
faithfully follow the plan outlined for five bee generations only 
(three will do if he is a live bee-keeper), and if the bald-headed, 
lopsided, more or less hairless, wingless and weak-kneed queen, 
drones and workers do not convince him he is inbreeding and 
that Parthenogenesis is a blessing, I would like for him to explain 
what is wrong with these bees. 

On the Mississippi. 



How a Subscriber Will Test Mendelism This Season 

GEO. SHIBER. 

^•JU'RIEXD TYRRELL: Perhaps the further discussion of the 

ir science of bee breeding from the standpoint of Mendel may 

make you ache, but during the past year I have been reading 

on the experiments of Mendel and I think it is going to be of 

benefit to bee-keepers. 

I was especially interested in the article by Dr. Ilonney in the 
January Review, as I have been making a study of the principles 
laid down, or rather proven by Alendel. Friend Bonney, so far in 
his article, seems not to believe that the bee is capable of further 
mutations (beelogically speaking) by reason of the fact that she is 
"highly specialized" — or may be we could leave oft' the word 
"highly" and come nearer his belief. If this be so, I do not agree 
with him, although I think facts will prove that the bee has reached 
a much higher specialized plane of development than most plants 
and animals. 



208 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

^^'hy are we in practical, everyday work in our apiaries occa- 
sionally running" across mutation or shall I call them freaks? Let 
me cite an instance: 

Last season I had a queen whose colony stored about seventy 
pounds of surplus, very much more than any other colony, and 
other things were equal. In my locality during 1911 that was an 
extra yield, for it was the poorest season I ever had, I think. Now 
what I want to ask is, was not this queen a case of mutation? Of 
course, it cannot be proven to a dead certainty, but don't it look 
a little that way? 

Well, I am going to prove this season, if I live, whether this 
queen is subject to the ]\Iendellian principle. I know queens are 
not as easily bred as garden peas, but barring parthenogenesis, I 
have in mind this program : 

About twenty queens were raised from this queen. A\'e will 
designate the mother queen as J and her daughter as J2x. The x 
equals their problematical mates. Xow then, if any of those T2x 
queens equal their mother, would it not be fair to conclude that in 
these queens, at least, there was a fixedness of the mutation prin- 
ciple? And then, further, the queens from those mothers (J2x). 
the daughters of which we will call J3x. should they show the same 
superiority as the old queen (J), would we not conclude that we 
had reached a higher specialized plane and that bees can be 
improved? 

This has been my notion of breeding for next year, and, of 
course, when I read the Bonney article I was all interest. I will 
confess, as we all know, that the drone mating is the "Kerosene in 
Aly CMaple Syrup." However, the only remedy is plenty of drones 
from the queen which comes the nearest to equalling J, and this D 
queen, I think, should be followed down as Dl. D2, etc.; this is 
the wa}^ I have the program mapped out. 1 can conceive of no 
other wav of fixing a characteristic where we have so many Xs to 
deal with (drones). 

Query: \\'ho will tell us how to control mating? Don't all 
speak at once. If bees were not highly specialized, we would, dur- 
ing the fifty years of queen-breeding in this country, have had a 
much better bee than we now have. But I believe that there is 
some room for further development. And it will take skill to reach 
that point because of the chance we run in getting the drone mating. 
If Alendel's principle applies to bees (and I tliiiik it does) this plan 
of breeding ought to show the best results as compared with other 
plans. AMien we have an extraordinary good storing colony, we, 
of course, want to preserve that quality in future generations. 

To continually select the best queen each year for a breeder, 
regardless of what her mother or grandmother has done. is. accord- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 



209 



ing to Mendel principle, a mistake. A close study of the science of 
genetics will be, I am sure, of great benefit to bee-keepers. 
Randorph, N. Y. 



Fastening Foundation in the Sections. 

L. C. WHEELER. 

OF course, I have a foundation fastener. So have the most of 
you, at least those of you w^ho run for comb honey. But I 
wonder how the most of you have yours arranged. I've seen 
them fastened to the wall where one was compelled to stand up to 
work them. I would be tired out before I had worked half a day 
in that position. Others have them fastened to the wall in such a 
position that it allows them to sit down. This is better. But T 
don't like them fastened to a wall. I want them so I can move 
them at will according to the weather, etc. So I fastened mine to 
a bench, in such a manner that I can sit on the end of the bench 
to work it. 'With this arrangement I can move up to the stove 
when it is cold, and out by the door or window in hot weather. 

How fast can you put foundation in the sections? If you are 
not putting them in as fast as you have heard of others doing, per- 
haps it is because you have not caught on to all the tricks. I find 
that I can put them in just about as fast again as I could the first 
season I used the foundation fastener. This is because I have begun 
to catch onto the w^ay of doing it. I use a full sheet and bottom 
starter a la Miller, 
and for a long time 
the little pieces for 
the bottom bothered 
me quite a lot to 
put them in. Now 
I can put them in 
as fast as I can pick 
them up and make 
the motions. 

I grasp the piece 
of foundation in my 
right hand, between 
the thumb and fore- 
finger (see illustra- 
tion), and at the 
same time throw out 
the hot plate with 

the foot lever, drop a Foundation Fastener that is Movable. 




210- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




How to Hold the Bottom Starters. 



the foundation on 
this, following- it up 
with the thumb and 
finger, and at the 
same time bringing 
the thumb and finger 
of the left hand into 
play in the same 
manner at the other 
end of the founda- 
tion. Almost the 

instant the foundation touches the hot plate I release it with my 
foot and as it drops back out of the way the foundation drops to 
place and a slight pressure fixes it firmly. 

As I grasp the section to turn it over for the larger piece of 
foundation my two forefingers touch the section on the out sides 
about in the center, and as I draw it away from the block I release 
my hold with the other fingers and leave the section suspended 
between the ends of those two fingers. A slight touch of the long 
middle finger now will whirl it over and the whole operation hasn't 
taken a second of time, and you have the section in position for 
the large sheet of foundation. This is very easily put in, as you 
have plenty of room to grasp it and hold it while you are putting 
it in position. 

All this looks like a small matter to be talking about, but a 
very little time saved on each one will count for a lot when you 
are putting up thousands of sections each vear. 




Turning the Section. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 211 

I have the supers at my left and as fast as I put in the founda- 
tion I set them in place in the super and when I get through the 
job is complete. 

]\Iany will think it a waste of foundation to put in full sheets 
and bottom starts as I do, but I have tested it out pretty thoroughly 
the last few years and I find it pays me. It's not only that I get 
more hone}-, but I get so much more fancy honey. 

Barrvton, ^lich. 



Improvement of the Bee. 

E. S. MILES. 

^^^ HiE above topic is one of the most important now confronting 
\Jj the bee-keeping fraternity in my humble opinion. Since I 
am an old personal acquaintance of Dr. Bonney, I hope he 
will pardon my reference to him. I will say for the enlightenment 
of the readers of the Review, that I lived for a long term of years 
only about five miles from the doctor, and now" live about twenty- 
five miles from him. 

I am glad to see that the doctor has modified his views some- 
what of late on this important question. A year or two ago he 
seemed quite certain that "bees were a highly specialized animal, 
and had about reached the limit of their development." 

It is gratifying to find out that our great college professors do 
not deny us common, ignorant chaps, the hope of a little ''modifica- 
tion" of the bee. 

Had the doctor's replies been otherwise than our own, (as we 
supposed) authorities on bees such as Doolittle, Miller, Hutchinson 
and Alexander, they would have found some of their laurels but 
willow branches after all, for they all teach that bees respond readily 
to careful selective breeding. 

A I.ITTI.I: FERSONAI. EXFISBIENCi:. 

Pardon a little personal experience, which I admit in advance 
has made me a little indifferent to opinions of learned theorists. 
Fourteen years ago I began breeding from a queen whose bees 
showed a greater variation in the direction of the qualities I wanted 
in bees of anything I had seen till that time. From that one colony, 
surrounded ever since with a lot of common bees, bred on good old 
Nature's own let alone plan, I have built up by selective breeding a 
couple of hundred colonies of bees that, for suret}- of crop, for 
hardiness and ability to take care of themselves, and for non- 
swarming qualities, are at least .50% better "than anything I have 
seen thus far in my bee-keeping experience. 



212 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

BliE-KEEFING HIS SOZ.I: BUSINESS. 

In order to enable your readers to judge somewhat as to my 
competency to judge on bee matters, I will say that I have kept 
bees continuously for 19 years. For five years bee-keeping has been 
my sole occupation. And before that I kept over IG'O colonies in 
one yard for many years. This experience has proved to me that 
the bee varies a great deal in many ways, and is quite susceptible 
of improvement by selective breeding". 

I grant that not having direct control of the male parentage 
is a drawback. But what one cannot do directly is sometimes quite 
possible indirectly. And as Dr. Miller has said, we can control the 
drone parentage indirectly. It would seem to me that if such 
writers as my good friend, the Doctor of Buck Grove, would give 
some of his experiments and experiences, tell us how many colonies 
his experience covers, how extensive his investigation into the actual 
work of our American bee raisers and queen breeders has been, we 
would be better able to rightly weigh his conclusions. 

For this reason, ]\Ir. Editor, I write this open letter and hope 
this discussion will lead to more activity in breeding for improve- 
ment of our little industrious pets. 

Dunlop, Harrison County, Iowa. 



A Discussion of Those Picture Grading Rules. 

BY THE SUBSCRIBERS. 

{Continued from April.) 

^-•Jj^ I RECTOR WILCOX, of Alauston, Wisconsin, in referring 
JB/ to the illustrations given at the head of the honey quota- 
tions column has this to say : 

"In looking at tlie illustration of the three grades of sections on 
page 155, I think the selections are just right, if we are to under- 
stand they are the poorest that can be admitted into the grades 
named." 

Another subscriber, Air. William Fritz, of Canastota, New York, 
believes that we should have a more complete description of the 
sections, which would include the weights. In writing to me about 
it, he says: 

"I would like to ask you to publish on page 85 of the January 
Review pictures of each grade of honey giving size of section, width 
and what each grade should weigh. Now we have Extra Fancy, 
Fancy, Numbers 1 and 2. Do all sections weigh alike in a case of 
24, or do they vary from 12 ounces to 17 ounces per section? I am 
in the habit of grading all mv 12-ounce sections bv themselves, also 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 213 

13, 13)/., 14, 14>^. 15, lojA, IG, 16>^, so that I know what is in each 
case of 24: of weight and color. Is this right and what would you 
do with honey that varies like the above? Having those pictures 
on page 35 will help one to grade his own honey."' 

The Colorado rules have been brought quite prominently to 
the front, and in many ways are. no doubt, the most thorough of 
anv we have. I have some times wondered if the rules were not 
so strict that they were a little unjust to the Colorado bee-keepers, 
for the reason that in some cases at least their Xumber 1 honey 
has been sold in the East by the buyer as Fancy and their Xumber 
2 as Xumber 1. AA'hile this bespeaks much credit for the Colorado 
grading. I can see where it might be unjust to them, in selling a 
Xumber 1 honey at a Xumber 2 price. 

Following I am giving you the opinion of Air. Rauchfuss 
regarding the pictures. 

"Dear Sir: — Assuming that you wish us to answer questions 
contained in your letter of the .25th inst. regarding illustrations and 
specimen sections (on page 35 of Review), from standpoint of the 
honey dealer we want to say that the illustration of the fancy 
would be satisfactory to us if this represents the poorest of that 
grade and no section in that grade to weigh less than 13^ ounces. 
Honey, comb and cappings to be white. Your illustration of the 
X'^o. 1, is, according to our grading, nothing but a good, average Xo. 
2 grade, for the reason that there are some uncapped cells along 
the top, besides the row next to the wood, and on the left side, 
near the middle, is a small projection on the cappings where evi- 
dently a brace had been built over to the separator. If a section 
of this finish is built between separators it will usually not come 
up to our standard of I31/2 ounces for X'^o. 1 grade. Illustration of 
X'o. 2 shows a section entirely too light for average trade: as far a:; 
we can judge by the illustration this section would not weigh more 
than 8 ounces. 

"The objection to the use of pictures to designate grades is 
that finish only can be shown, but not color. 

"We are thoroughly in favor with your eft'orts to get uniform 
grading rules established all over the country, if such a thing is 
possible, and standards should be adopted by supply manufacturers 
for tmiform, outside dimensions of shipping cases, to do away with 
the variation in length and height of the same style of cases, which 
is quite annoying in loading cars and stacking honey in warehouse, 
besides spoiling the looks of the goods. 

"According to our opinion one of the principal causes of the 
lack of interest shown hx dealers in the big cities to handle comb 
honey, is the lack of uniformity of this article, as packed by the 
majority of producers. The bee journals have not done as much 



214 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

as they might to inform their readers as to the best methods of 
preparing the crop for market, and now is the time when this should 
be brought up. 

"To set the ball rolling, we are sending you herewith a copy 
of the grading rules and grading instructions that were adopted at 
the last annual meeting of the Colorado State Bee-Keepers' Associa- 
tion. You may publish these if you see fit and invite discussion. 
The underlying principle of these rules is, to secure the packing of 
sections of uniform color and as near uniform weight as possible in 
the higher grades. To have the lower grades of such weight and 
finish as will satisfy the dealer that caters to the masses with a 
popular priced article. To have all grades satisfactory, by packing 
nothing but good, saleable stock. 
''Yours very truly, 

"The Colorado Honey Producers' Association, 
"Frank Rauchfuss, Manager." 
(Continued in July number.) 



Effective Method of Caring for Wax at Out- 
Apiaries. 

MATHILDE CANDLER. 

' "Jl N my work, as I keep no horse, I am constantly confronted 
^ with the problem of getting along without a means of con- 
venient transportation to and from the apiary. For myself, 
I use the cars ; but for moving honey and fixtures the freight is too 
high for such a short distance, and I would need to hire a team 
anyhow to transfer to and from the depot. It will not pay, usually, 
to hire a team to do much hauling of anything less than full loads, 
and I must keep the stufif that I wish to move from place to place 
until I get enough together to make up a load. 

In the matter of supplies and honey this is not so difficult, as 
I have a good shop and have a bee-tight honey-house at each apiary 
and, so far, have never been troubled by thievish or meddlesome 
intruders ; but the saving of wax and pieces of comb which accumu- 
late, and which contain more or less pollen, and keeping it from 
being destroyed by moths until I am able to move it is quite a trick. 

USES BOXES AND BARRi:i.S. 

All odds and ends of wax and comb are collected into boxes 
and barrels, having newspapers wrapped and tied around them. 
When the weather gets hot and mothworms are sure to appear, I 
pour carbon bisulphide, of which I always aim to keep a supply on 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 215 

hand, over the top of the wax and close the barrels up tight. This 
is done several times during the busy part of the season and in this 
way I can keep it pretty w^ell until I have time to melt, or partially 
melt, it in order to reduce its bulk so 1 can send it home along wdth 
some other things that need hauling. 

At the end of the w^hite honey flow, after the comb honey has 
been taken home, the barrels of cappings and comb containing honey 
are tipped over on the honey-house floor and the door is left open 
for about a week. When 1 come agam at the end of that time 
everything is nice and dry, and the honey-house has been cleaned 
up of honey and stickiness. The cappings are put back to be melted 
in the winter and the rest of the wax and comb is melted up in 
a large tub over a blue flame oil stove. This does not require much 
looking after, except filling as the wax melts down, and can be done 
in between while I am doing something else. 

When all is melted it is dipped into gunny sacks and after all 
has drained out that will, these are hung up out in the air and sun 
and left until I can take them and the cakes of w'ax home. 

In winter I melt and remelt all w^ax and refuse that I have on 
hand, using a Hershiser press. As the wax rises it is dipped into a 
boiler set on the back of the stove, where it keeps liquid while it 
slowly settles and clarifies. 

Bee-keeping is largely a matter of little things, therefore a 
mention of my wax molds may not be too trivial, especially not to 
the busy Mrs. Bee-keeper wdiose dishes and pans have been called 
into use to serve as w^ax molds, and which require quite a little 
work to clean and scour for kitchen use again. 

CICrAB BOXES FOB WAX MOUI.DS. 

I use cigar boxes to mold the wax into cakes. All loose paper 
is first torn out and the box then dipped in cold water. A spoonful 
or two is left in the box, although this is really not necessary, as 
it alw^ays leaks out. 

A\'ax at the boiling point is too thin and will leak out like water; 
but leave it stand at the back of the stove for awhile and it becomes 
thicker, though remaining liquid, and when cold the wax brick can 
be readily turned out. 

The box can be filled eight or ten times. After that the wax 
is liable to stick to the middle of the bottom unless the spot, which 
has become waxy and will not take the water, is first thoroughl}^ 
scraped out. I prefer to throw the box away and use a new one. 
Yet I have spread a piece of paper, cut to fit and thoroughly damp- 
ened and pressed down over the bottom when it was waxy with 
good results. I think if the box were painted on the outside before 
using and loose paper on the inside pasted down with- paint, it 
w^ould last a lono- time. 



216 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Any loose paper must ahvays l)e torn out before each using; 
otherwise this becomes imbedded in the hardened wax and makes it 
difficult to turn it out. 

The ordinary cigar-box forms a two-pound brick. By putting 
a piece of tin cut just the right size exactly in the middle after pour- 
ing in the wax, I can get cakes weighing as near an exact pound as 
it is possible to get it, I think. 

These wax molds are cheap, easily obtained, convenient, and 
save work and muss ; and the bricks are in an. ideal shape for 
packing for shipment. 

Cassville, Wis. 

[Just how to keep the vvax moths from eating up the pieces of comla at the 
out-apiary is something that no doubt at some time or other has been a pro1:)lem 
to all of us. The method given by Miss Candler is certainly ingenious and should 
accomplish the purpose desired.] 



Improved Wiring Gauge. 

E. F. ATWATER. 

'•l| N wiring our frames, we find that best results are secured by 
jl using fairly tight wires, so last winter I devised the wiring 
gauge shown in the cuts. 
There is a stop at one lower corner, and another narrow wedge- 
shaped stop comes just between two wire holes, at the same end of 




Atwater's Wiring Gauge. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



217 




It "Springs In" the End Bars. 



the frame. At the opposite end is fixed a small furniture caster, 
and the distance between this caster and the wedge-shaped stop, at 
the other end, is o Ki inch less than the outside length of the frame. 

The frame is easily forced in place, by dropping one end against 
the stops, while the other rolls in past the caster, bending in the 
end-bars. The frame is then wired, and the little nails forced into 
the wood, while the frame is in the gauge, with a pair of pliers, 
with jaws bent to the proper angle, ^^'hen removed from the gauge, 
the end-bars spring in place, and the wires are as tight as could 
be desired. 

Others have also devised machines to "spring in" the end-bars, 
but so far as I have seen, they are comparatively complicated 
arrangements of springs and levers, while ours is as simple as it 
could be made and embody the necessary principles. 

The hole shown, below the caster, is to allow more finger-room 
to wind the end of the wire around the tack. 

Less time is required for the work, and the combs are decidedly 
better than before. 

Meridian. Idaho. 

[Springing in the end bars while putting in the wire in order to have the wire 
tight when completed is a new one to me. Friend Atwater says that the methods 
have been described before for doing this but 1 must confess I have never tried 
any of them. The plan outlined above looks practical to me.] 



218 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Improving Your Bees While Producing Honey. 

GEO. B. HOWE. 

(Contitmed from May number J) 

iBut I found that queens started from the egg would live four 
years, or as long as swarm-cell queens. That one day as a zvorker- 
larvae, or two or three days counted a year in the usefulness of said 
queen. Who can tell the exact age of a larvae in all kinds of 
weather, more especially in the fall or when we have cold nights? 
I can guess and that is about all. 

I am not one who wants the easy method just because it is 
cheap, for it is mighty dear in the end. Then why not rear the 
very best queens we know how, for it is the foundation of our business. 

Take an old tough comb and put it in the center of your breed- 
ing queen colony. If the comb is clean she will soon lay what 
eggs you want in it for queens. Now we want a colony as near 
the condition of a colony that is about to swarm as possible, so 
we will prepare our colony for cell building. Take a' strong colony, 
a hybrid preferred, as you can get more and larger cells. Italians 
are not the best bees for queen rearing, I find. Now shake the 
bees ofif the combs of unsealed larvae. Don't leave an open cell. 
No, not one, for if you do you will have to look the combs over 
and destroy them before the cells are ripe or ready to distribute 
to nuclei. Take the queen away at the same time you do the 
unsealed larvae. Trade the combs of unsealed brood with other 
colonies. Now you have only removed one bee from that colony 
and that is the queen. And you have lots of hatching bees and 
no end of nurse bees. Unless there is a honey flow, put a feeder on 
and every night feed a pint of half honey and water. Honey is what 
you must have to raise good queens with. Sugar syrup zvill not do, 
and the thinned honey is better than undiluted honey. 

WHEnr TO PREPARE THE COLONY. 

You prepare this colony about six to twelve hours before the 
eggs are ready to hatch from that breeding queen. Now, then, 
there is no guesswork about the age of those larvae if you looked 
to see about when the breeding queen laid in the comb. You take 
out one of the combs in your prepared colony and put the comb as 
near the center of the broodnest as you can, or you could use a 
dummy in the cell building colony if you prefer. Now I find I can 
take the queen cells as the queen hatches out and with a little swab 
and warm water clean them very quickly and better than the bees 
will do for me. First I cut the cell down to about one-fourth of an 
inch of the wooden cell cups. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



219 




Home Apiary of J. F. Burton, Vail, Iowa. 



In transferring our eggs or larvae I simply brush and shake 
the bees off and slip the comb under my coat to keep them nice 
and warm while going to and from my transferring room, for this 
room should be good and hot, lOO will do no harm. After we get our 
cells cleaned and ready we leave them where they are good and 
warm, going to our cell building colony after our young larvae 
about 24 hours after, or when the larvae are about 12 hours old. 

Now note how they have fed those larvae. They are just float- 
ing in royal jelly. Again, pick out the ones that have the most 
jelly and transfer them into your cell cups. You don't need any 
primed cell cups, you have a good big lot of royal jelly right where 
you want it. I use a quill to transfer with. A duck quill is the 
best. Scrape down the quill on one side real thin, cut off the other 
half with a sharp knife, scrape the end so when you shove it down 
to the bottom of the cell it will double up and pick about every bit 
of royal jelly out of the cell. I take a wooden toothpick and just 
slide the larvae and jelly into the center and bottom of cell. I use 
the Standard Langstroth frame, not a G frame, as the editor made 
me say. Now work as fast as you can and get those larvae back 
to the cell building colony as quick as you can. Don't forget to 
slip the frame of cells under your coat to keep them nice and warm. 
Don't be negligent. Now if you can get those cells into that hive 
before the nurse bees get into those cells to feed those larvae, you 
can do better than I can. If you have better success by letting the 
bees clean and shape the cells let them do it for you, as some claim 



220 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




that the bees will not accept 
the wide-mouthed cells. I 
have no trotible that way. 
Thev generally accept every 
cell.' 

Do not give too many cells 
early and late, 12 to 15 are 
enough. In warm weather 23 
to -10. but I rather not use 
over 30 at any time. For 
nuclei I want two frames of 
brood, bees and honey. In 
warm weather a small nuclei 
will do to mate queens with, 
but early and late in the sea- 
son too much chance for the 
cell to be chilled and that 
don't do your queens any good. 

VSH THi: 
WEST CEIiI. PROTECTOR. 

Now you want the West 
cell protectors, as you can 
slip tlie cells into them and 
stick the cell in the center of 
the comb and where the cluster is and above the frames tight to- 
gether and no harm is done the cell. .UziHiys handle the cells z'ery 
carefully when you are transferring the cells from the cell building 
colony to the nuclei. I use a small basket with something soft in 
the bottom to lay the cells on, also a warm cloth to cover them up 
to keep them warm and to shade them if there is a hot sun. Never 
set them in the hot sun. as it will not take long to ruin them. 

CAGIITG THE CEIiIiS. 

// you have to cage the cells (which I do not approve of), put 
three or four of the nurse bees that are caring for the cell in the cage 
with the cell. A queen bites the cap of her cell and sticks her 
tongue out for food, and the nurse bees feed her, and you will get 
more good queens with the nurse bees in the cage with her. She 
often kills one of the nurse bees as soon as she gets out of the 
cell. There should always be good candy in the cage for the nurse 
bees and queen. I hear some say why all that fussing. Now is it 
fussing? Do the breeders of cows neglect their calves? Well I 
should say not, or the poultry keeper his chicks ! He gives them 
the very best care and the best of feed, and develops them to the 
best of his ability. 

(Coiiiimied in July issue.) 



This Doesn't Look Like Inbreeding. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 221 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL, Managing Editor. 

Office — 230 W^oodland Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1SV9. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Discontinuances — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

Advertising rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



Get ready to send in your crop report just as soon as you 
receive the July Re\te\v. It will contain a report JDlank for that 
purpose. 



Just now, when the surplus is piling up on the hives, is a 
good time to get that "think tank" of yours started as to where, 
when and how vou are ooinor to sell that honev next fall. 



The Cause of European Foul Brood. 

Circular Xo. 157. issued May 10th, by the Bureau of Ento- 
mology, United States Department of Agriculture, and written by 
G. F. Whitem, Ph. D., treats of the cause and detection of European 
Foul Brood, and can be had by addressing the above department. 
The circular contains l(i pages and cover, G by inches. It should 
be in the hands of every bee-keeper, as too much can not be known 
concernino- this dread disease. 



Western Honey Producers' Association Has Moved. 

The treasurer and Manager. \\'. P. Southworth, of Sioux City, 
Iowa, has written me that the Western Honey Producers' Associa- 
tion has moved its headquarters from Salix, Iowa, to Sioux City, 
Iowa. Mr. Southworth advises me that this company is composed 
of bee-keepers who have joined forces for mutual benefits. We are 
glad to report this progress on the part of the producers and wish 
them abundant success in their new quarters. 



222 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

Chemical Analysis and Composition of Imported Honey From Cuba, 

Mexico and Haiti. 

A 24-page circular, with cover, was issued under the above 
heading by the Bureau of Chemistry, U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, on April 29th, and can be had at five cents per copy. This 
bulletin is of a technical nature, and the bee-keeper who does not 
understand chemistry would not get very much information from it. 



Preventing Bee Stings, 

J. F. Alunday says in The Australasian Beekeeper that he has 
noticed that when he pulled up grass or weeds with his bare hands 
before opening a hive, the bees went for those hands with vigor. 
He doesn't do it now. He says he has found it best to work with 
bees with dry hands, as free from scent as possible. One exception 
is that he has found it beneficial to blow a little smoke from the 
smoker on his hands before manipulating a hive. 



Wintering Report for Canada. 

Provincial Apiarist Morley Petit, who is also our vice-presi- 
dent, is doing good work in Canada in getting statistics on the 
honey crop. He has just compiled a report concerning the winter- 
ing of bees in Canada. Blanks were sent to 1,680 bee-keepers. 
Nearly 1,000 replied, 125 of whom were out of the business. Total 
number of colonies reported by 844 bee-keepers for the fall of 1911 
was 3,911, for May, 1912, was 2,628, this reaching a winter loss of 
15'%. This is one per cent more than was reported one year ago. 
Mr. Petit believes that the loss in Canada is even heavier than the 
15% above mentioned, realizing that a large number sent in no 
report at all. 

George W. York Goes West, 

"Wednesday, May 15th, will be our regular noonday luncheon. 
Mr, George W. York, one of our newly acquired citizens from 
Chicago, who for twenty years was editor of the American Bee 
Journal, will be our guest. Mr. York will tell us why he came to 
Bonner County to make his home. Bring your friends. The Sand- 
point Commercial Club, Eaton H. Edgerton, Sec." So reads a 
postal card from Sandpoint, Idaho, Avhich reached my desk recently. 
We are pleased to note this welcome being given our president. 

It will seem strange to think of Chicago as not being Mr. 
York's home. It will seem stranger still to think of the American 
Bee Journal without Mr. York as its editor. His efforts have been 
untiring in behalf of the bee-keepers, and he has been especially 
active in behalf of the National Bee-Keepers' Association. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 223 

However, you are still our President, and we have you located 
and we shall expect to hear from you occasionally. The Review 
pages are open to you. 

V\e wish you the best success possible in your new home. 



New Postal Rules Concerning the Mailing of Queen Bees. 

Dr. E. F. Phillips, of AA ashington, has kindly favored me with 
a copy of the new ruling concerning the mailing of queen bees. 
This ruling should do much to prevent the spread of disease through 
the mailing of queens and bees from infected apiaries, and should be 
welcomed by the bee-keeping fraternity. It is quite safe to say 
that the disease is now present in many apiaries where it would not 
have been had it not been brought there through the mails. 

The ruling is as follows: 

Office of the Postmaster General^ 

Washington. May 3, 1912. 
Order No. 6242. 

Paragraph 7, Section 49'6, Postal Laws and Regulations, is 
amended by substituting for the first clause thereof the following: 

Queen bees and their attendant bees, when accompanied by a 
copy of a certificate of the current year from a state or government 
apiary inspector to the efifect that the apiary from which said queen 
bees are shipped is free from disease or by a copy of a statement 
by the bee-keeper made before a notary public or other ofificer 
having a seal that the honey used in making the candy used in the 
queen mailing cage has been diluted and boiled in a closed vessel. 



The American Bee Journal Has a New Owner. . 

A long time ago, probably 16 or 18 years. I wrote a question 
about upper entrances and sent it to the American Bee Journal. At 
that time the "bee-fever" was developing nicely, and I waited 
anxiously for the issue which would have the question and the reply. 
It came, and the answer was written by Mr. Dadant. Needless to 
say that was the most valued issue of the American Bee Journal I 
had ever received. I also felt very grateful to the man who would 
take the time to answer me, a mere beginner, and many trips did 
I take (in fancy) to Hamilton, 111. 

But I had to wait until the Minneapolis meeting of the National 
last fall before I came face to face with the one who answered my 
question, and it seemed to me like meeting an old acquaintance. 
Although our meeting was of necessity brief, yet the impression I 
carried away with me from Minneapolis was not at all unfavorable 
to Mr. Dadant. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

\\'lien I learned that Mr. York who, since 18S(j, has owned and 
edited the American Bcc Journal^ had decided to "go west, young- 
man, and grow up with the country," I could not help but feel 
delighted that the task of piloting the old ship had fallen into the 
hands of Mr. C. P. Dadant. His experience as a producer of honey 
by the carload will give him the eyes of a bee-keeper in looking at 
the bee-keeper's problems, while his wide experience as an apiacul- 
tural writer, both here and abroad, will enable him to "tell it in a 
way we can understand." Here's my hand. Brother Dadant. I 
can't help but feel that you are the right man in the right place. 



How to "Boil Down" Your Contributions. 

The Aincrican Bcc Journal for May contains a little editorial 
asking its subscribers to "boil down" what they write. This is one 
of the hardest things for a new^ writer to do. 

^^'hen I first began writing, that advice used to stand over me 
like a club and was realh' an obstacle in getting my thoughts 
clearly expressed on paper. If I tried to write a short article the 
chances were that I would leave out a good man/ of the important 
details and still the article would contain considerable chaff. 
"Boiling down" does not necessarily mean shortening an article in 
the way some folks would understand it. Xo article is too long to 
publish, providing it contains something worth Avhile in everv para- 
graph, but not every long article is Avorth the space it occupies, and 
a short article, so far as space is concerned, may be too long to 
publish. The question then is, how to get your writings in such a 
shape that they will tell your story clearly and still use no more 
words than necessary. Let me tell you how" to do it. 

Sit down and w^-ite out the article without any thought of 
making it short. Tell your story in detail from beginning to end. 
Do not miss a single important point and never mind how many 
pages of paper you fill in writing it. Tell it as nearly as possible 
as you would tell it to a person with whom you were talking. 
Keep in mind at all times that the thing sought for is to give full 
particulars in such a way that your readers will understand them. 

Having written the article out in full, go back to the beginning 
and read it carefully. Take your pencil and cut out every 
unnecessary word or sentence. Do not cut out anything Avhich 
destroys the meaning, but chop out everything you can and still 
leave the meaning clear. When you get through you will be sur- 
prised at the amount you have cut out. Go over the article once 
more and change the sentences whercAcr possible where such change 
will shorten the sentence and still leave the meaning. After you 

{Continued on page 2j6) 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 225 

Atib tta 1BrattrI|PS 

Officers. Directors. 

George W. York, Tresident Sandpoint. Ida. E. D. Towxsexd. ( iiainnan Remus, Mich. 

MoRLEY Pettit, N'ice-Pres. . .Guelph, Ont., Can. J. M. Buchaxax Franklin, Tenn. 

E. B. Tyrrell, Secretary Detroit, Mich. Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. 

230 Woodland Ave. J. T.. Craxe Middlebury, Vt. 

X. E. Fraxce, Treas. Gen. Mgr., Plattville, Wis. F. Wilcox Mauston, Wis. 

N'aticnal Branches and Their Secretaries. 

Adirondack — H. E. Gray.. Fort Edwards, X.Y. X. Michigan — Ira D. Bartlett 

Colorado— Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. East Jordan, INIich. 

Chicago-Xorthwestern— L. C. Dadant.... Ohio— Prof. X. E. Shaw, Dept of Agr. . . 

Hamilton, 111. W " V •;; ' ^ t^ • -Columbus Ohio 

IDAHO-R. D. Bradshaw Xotus, Ida. ONT.^RIO-P. \\ . Hodgetts, Parliament BIdg 

. , r> , r- • ,- ij Ti, loronto, Unt., Can. 

Illinois— Jas. A. btone.. .Rt. 4, Springfield, 111. Oregon— H. Wilson Corvallis, Ore. 

Iowa— C. L. Pinney De Mars, Iowa. Pecos Valley— Henry C. Barron..^ 

Indiana — Walter Pouder, 859 Mass. Ave. . . Hagerman, Xew Mexico 

Indianapolis, Ind. Twin Falls — C. H. Stimson. .Twin Falls, Ida. 

MissoLRi — J. F. Diemer Lilaerty, Mo. Texxessee — T. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn. 

MiCHiGAX — E. B. Tyrrell, 230 Woodland \'ermoxt — P. E. Crane Middlebury, \'t. 

Ave., Detroit. Mich. Washington — T. B. Ramage 

MiNNESOT.\ — C. E. Palmer. 1024 Miss. St.. " Rt. 2, X. Yakima, Wash. 

St. Paul, Minn. Wiscoxsix — Gus Dittmer Augusta, Wis. 



Glass Packages for National Members. 
AA'e hope to have prices and descriptions of glass honey 
packages in time to give them to you in the July Re\'iew. As a 
feeler I might say that from present indications we \vill be able 
to get you half pound jelly glasses, packed in six dozen cases, at 
about 1.) cents per dozen. 



California State Association. 
This Association is endeavoring to get statistics on the honey 
crop by asking for reports from a number of the State Associations 
throughout the country. AMiile we appreciate this spirit of progress 
on the part of the bee-keepers, yet we cannot help but feel that if 
the California Association would join forces with the National the 
reports they will receive will l3e more valuable and more complete 
than what they can get personally. 



The Oregon National Branch. 

H. F. Wilson, of Corvallis, Oregon, who is the secretarv. advises 
me that the Oregon branch of the X. B. K. -\. has secured from 
the State Board of Agriculture space and funds for an exhibit of bees 
and bee products at their next state fair. They will also take an 
active interest in securing a new Foul Brood Bill. It seems that 
one passed the Legislature last year, but was vetoed bv the Gov- 



226 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

ernor because it did not provide for funds for carrying out the work. 
Aly gracious, boys, don't ever do a tricl< like that again. Getting 
funds out of a Legislature is something like prosecuting a damage 
suit — you ask for $10,000 if you expect to get $1,000. 

Chairman Townsend Explains the Resolutions. 

In this issue you will read a series of resolutions relative to 
the policy of the National in regard to Local and State Associations 
other than National branches. It will be seen by this very liberal 
ofifer that the management is desirous that every association in 
America become a branch and have all the advantages offered by 
the National to its members, without a cent of expense, until the 
next annual meeting. 

The resolutions themselves explain the reason for the dispensa- 
tion of dues by the National management until the different asso- 
ciations meet again, when the matter of joining the National can 
then be taken up and decided upon as each association may see fit. 

Your attention is called to the clause in the resolutions provid- 
ing that where the association takes advantage of this dispensation 
rule, the members do not have to be subscribers' to the ofBcial 
organ, the Rfa'iew, but of course they miss the important notices, 
etc., if they are not subscribers. 

Again, I would call your attention to the fact that the dollar 
received for the Review a year is all the revenue we are receiving 
to manage this great National Association. 

Another fact, of minor importance. l)ut I will mention it, is 
that the whole management, both offfcers and directors, are work- 
ing for the Association absolutely free of charge. Of course the 
Managing Editor, who puts his whole time to the work, as would be 
expected, gets some pay. 

Let us talk about the constitution adopted at ^linneapolis last 
year. There are things about that constitution which need chang- 
ing to conform to the present work and plans. This can all be 
done by the delegates at their February meeting. Likely this dele- 
gates' meeting will be held late in the month, giving ample time 
for all associations to hold their annual meetings, before the Na- 
tional, and instruct their delegates in what is wanted along the 
line of bettering the features of the National. 

There are some associations like New York and California, 
where there is an association of associations. Some provision 
should be made in the National constitution, so that such associ- 
ations can be allowed to continue with the old constitutions and 
by-laws and still be National branches. 

Remember, you are cordially invited to take advantage of the 
liberal oft'er made possible l)y the dispensation rule referred to. and 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 227 

we expect that by the time of your next annual meeting to have 
convinced you all that you cannot afford to stay out of the Na- 
tional from a dollar and cents viewpoint, and that you will all be 
with us during 1913. 

Six thousand strong by January 1st, 1914, is the slogan. 

E. D. TowxSEXD^ Chairman. 



Why Should the National Bee-Keepers' Association Buy the 
Bee-Keepers' Review? 

This is a question many will be asking at this time. All will 
doubtless admit that the usefulness of this organization will depend 
much upon the means at its disposal and economy of expenditure. 
But to have means it must have members. How shall they be 
secured? 

You may ask a member of a local branch to join the National 
organization and you may be met very promptly with the question : 
"What inducements have you to offer?" "Wliy, sir, you can attend 
the annual meeting and vote or elect a delegate to vote for you." 
"But that will cost me fifteen or twenty dollars. No. I guess not," 
"But, sir, you can get your tin cans for shipping your honey to 
market at cost." He replies that he does not produce extracted 
honey and tin cans, however cheap, will do him little good. "But, 
my dear sir," you add, "you can get the annual report." This is 
something of an inducement, but to very many bee-keepers it would 
seem rather high. 

Suppose you say that for $1.50 you can have all the advantages 
of your local organization and a good reliable journal, monthly, 
with the annual report thrown in, as well as the notices and items 
of information about the National organization with them with 
arrangements so you can save many times the cost of membership 
fee yearly in buying your yearly supplies, 

A few years ago I was asked to address the Connecticut Bee- 
Keepers' Association, ^^^^en I reached the hall I found the presi- 
dent engaged in dividing up large quantities of comb foundation 
into small lots. On inquiry, I was told how the Connecticut Asso- 
ciation could buy large quantities of foundation for much less than 
individuals could, and so when they came together they divided the 
foundation so each could get just the amount he wanted. 

Economy, in Conducting the Business of the Xational Association. 
— I notice in the last annual report of the National Bee-Keepers' 
Association that the largest bills were for printing and postage and 
mailing the annual report. Now I must confess I do not know 
very much about the publishing business, but it seems to me that 



228 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

the annual report could be published and distributed for about one- 
third the present cost if we had a regular organ through which it 
could go to its members. A part of the report might be published 
in each number of the Review for a few months and give about as 
much as the average person would care to read at one time. I 
remember the New York Tribune, some fifty years ago, used to 
print the reports of the Xew York Farmers' Club, I believe it was 
called, and those reports interested me more at that time than any- 
thing else in the paper. 

Perhaps I am a little previous as the matter of printing- a report 
of the annual meeting has not even been mentioned among the 
directors that I am aware of. But some one will say that this is 
only an experiment and a rather costly one. Well, most new meth- 
ods of doing business are experiments. This has seemed to the 
directors an experiment worth trying. \\'e expect to succeed. We 
shall certainly try very hard to do so. 

J. E. Crane, Director, 

Middleburv, A^t. 



A Way for Your Association to Become a National Branch With- 
out Waiting for Your Next Annual Meeting. 

(The following resolutions are, in a measure, self-explanatory. 
They are needed in order to quickly organize the different branches 
without waiting for their next meeting. They are given you in 
response to many requests received at this office from Association 
officers asking how their Association can be treated as a branch 
until their next meeting, when formal action can be taken.) 

Whereas, It is the desire and object of the National Bee-Keep- 
ers' Association to unite the bee-keepers of the United States and 
Canada in one vast organization and to promote the organization 
and work of branches in every state and province ; and 

Whereas, The formation of a separate National branch in anx- 
state or province where a local bee-keepers' association is already 
established would necessarily conflict with the work of the associ- 
ation ; and 

Whereas, The majority of the state and provincial associations 
did not have an opportunity to thoroughly consider the National 
plans and take such action as was necessary to become a local 
branch at their last convention, due in some cases to the conven- 
tion being held before the new National constitution was adopted, 
and in other cases the work and plans of the National not being 
thorough!}' understood ; and 

Whereas, The National Association now having purchased the 
Bee-Keepers' Review, and having an official organ of their own, it 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 229 

is desired that a National branch be established at once in each 
state and province ; therefore be it 

Rcsolz-cd. That the Directors of the National Association do 
hereby rule that it is our desire to give every local association an 
opportunity to become a National branch, wherever the state and 
provincial ofificers of the various associations will agree to act as 
officers of a National branch, with their meml^ers entitled to full 
benefits of the National, until their next regular meeting, when the 
matter is to be brought before their members for action. It is 
further 

Resolved, If in case favorable action is taken at the next meet- 
ing of any association, that association is henceforth to be consid- 
ered as a National branch, but in case they do not vote to become 
a National branch then this privilege above extended is to be imme- 
diately withdrawn and steps taken to form a National branch in 
that state or province. It is further 

Resolved, That all paid-up members in the said association 
where the officers agree to act as branch officers for the National, 
will be considered paid-up members in the National Association 
and entitled to full benefits. This, however, does not include a 
subscription to the National organ, in which the notices and reports 
are to be published and which in every case must be subscribed for 
in addition to the payment of the branch fees as provided above, 
where each member desires to be placed upon the subscription list 
and receive the Review regularly. It is understood that this sub- 
scription is not compulsory. 

Signed this 14th dav of Alav. 1913. 



The Rabbit Is Out of the Brush Heap. 

Sometimes I go hunting. \\'hen I do I quite often find in my 
travels a lot of rabbit tracks around a brush heap, and while I am 
not always successful, yet many times by climbing on top of that 
brush pile and tramping around, out pops the rabbit. 

I just knew there was a rabbit in that California brush heap. 
But the thing was to find him. My tramping around over it in the 
April number has started him, and the following letter from Harry 
Hill will show you what it is : 

Willows, Cal., April 21, IDM. 
Mr. E. B. Tyrrell, 

Sec. N. B. K..A., Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Sir. — In your April number you discuss the California sit- 
uation and I was impressed by the fact that you did not seem to be 
clearly informed as to the reasons why the California association 
withdrew. 



230 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Now I wish to state before going farther that I do not belong 
to the state association, and was not at their convention when they 
withdrew, but the matter was thoroughly discussed at our Northern 
California Association convention, and I think the reasons are 
identical. 

As you probably know, there has been considerable activity 
among California bee-keepers of late with the idea of bringing the 
different associations in the state under one head and advancing our- 
selves generally in ways impossible in our present factional condition. 

In our Northern California convention I was so fortunate as to 
be one of the members of the committee appointed to meet with the 
delegates of the other associations present and act upon organiza- 
tion and legislation. It was in this committee meeting that the 
National Association received its hardest knocks. 

J. E. Walker, secretary of the Tulare County Association, (an 
organization, I believe, which represents more territory than its 
name implies), stated that the members of his association would not 
unite with the state association unless the National Association 
were stricken out. He stated that while he personally might be 
induced to join, that the remaining members would still be irrecon- 
cilable. Mr. Walker was supported by the other delegates from 
his association and elsewhere. 

Now, here was a real obstacle to forming a new state associa- 
tion on modern lines. The National had not been of much use 
anyway, and we were informed that they had withdrawn the legal 
protection that they originally gave the members — I have never as- 
certained the truth of this statement — so why retain it at the expense 
of a real state-wide association, able to meet our needs? 

Nor were their arguments without force. The Tulare Asso- 
ciation is organized on progressive principles, and among other 
things market their crops through their association, selling in car 
lots in the east. Here is where the shoe pinched. Certain men, very 
prominent in our National Association, it appears, are also large 
buyers, and use the power of the National Association to advance 
their own interests at the expense of the producers. Personally I 
have never come in contact with the eastern markets, selling to local 
leeches instead of national ones, so cannot verify their experience 
with my own, but am satisfied that they have a real and growing 
grievance which must be thrashed out before the National can be 
of much real service to the producer. I cannot explain their troubles 
as these men can, and do not intend to try. I write to give you an 
idea of how things are shaping here, and with the hope that you 
will get in touch with Mr. J. E. Walker, Tulare, Rural Route 1, 
Box 3, who can probably make their position much clearer to you. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 231 

I am satisfied that the Northern California Association would 
have withdrawn had the matter been put to a vote, and certainly 
the delegates from the State Association were given to understand 
that if it withdrew it would be no bar to our becoming a part of it. 
As it was, the matter was laid over until our next meeting. 

Personally I would like to see the National x\ssociation develop 
into something useful to the producer, and would like to be a part 
of it if it were, which is a feeling that is probably held by most of 
the progressive bee-keepers of the state. It seems to me that as 
the interests of the producers and buyers are always opposed, that 
it would be better to limit the meml^ership of the buyers somewhat. 

Yours truly, 
■■ HARRY K.HILL. 

Here we have it in a nut shell. The California bee-keepers be- 
lieve that the National is dominated and controlled by supply men 
and honey buyers. Right here let me say as secretary, that this 
same opinion holds in some other quarters. Don't blame you one 
bit for being opposed to it, if you entertain that belief. For how 
could a bee-keepers' association be successful if it was not run by 
the bee-keepers themselves? 

But I want to say to you that the supply men and honey buy- 
ers do not control or run the National. Not if 1 know anything 
about it. ]More than that, they have not attempted to, since I have 
been secretary, at least. If there ever was a time when the National 
was run by bee-keepers, now is that time. 

Quoting from the above letter we read : "Certain men very 
prominent in our National Association, it appears, are also large 
buyers, and use the power of the National Association to advance 
their own interests at the expense of the producers." Name them. 
Friend Hill. I want to know who they are. Not an officer or 
director buys honey to any extent, unless it is Director Crane, who 
buys to care for his personal trade. But he is a producer, every 
inch of him. and is standing up for the producers' interests. If 
there are any men guilty of the charges you mention, and you will 
help me locate them, I will give their names to the bee-keeping" 
world. 

"Personally, I have never come in contact with the eastern mar- 
kets, selling to local leeches instead of National ones." AMiat do 
you mean by that? Aren't your California Co-operative Associa- 
tions, especially the one you mention, reliable? Are they leeches? 
Are you one of the co-operators who doesn't co-operate? Surely not. 

Now then, boys, if the National is not right, get in and help us 
make it right. You can't remedy it from the outside. The more 
of vou fellows who are out. the more chance for those things being 



232 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



done which you mention in your letter. I do not blame you for 
your position, believing as you do. I only blame you for not finding 
out the facts. Or, if I am hoodwinked and am being used for a 
"cat's paw" I want to know it. This is plain talk, but it means 
business. 



Some Letters I Have Received Regarding the Sale 
of the Review, 



Chicago, 111., May 9, 1912. 
Editor Bee- Keepers' Review, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Sir : Enclosed herewith you 
should find cheque for the sum of $3 
in payment of the bill you rendered 
on the 7th inst. for three months' and 
the remaining seven as noted on the 
bill. 

I also notice that the Review is novv' 
to belong to the National Bee-Keepers' 
Association. 

There can be no question as to the 
wisdom of this course so far as the 
association is concerned, and we can 
see that it is the nucleus for further 
consolidation. 

There are going to be the following 
classes in the commercial world — the 
producer, the manufacturer, the im- 
porter and a modified form of retailer. 
All other persons engaged in distribu- 
tion will be hirelings. Of course all 
are consumers. 

The young man of 25 years will see 
more changes in the ensuing half cen- 
tury than his grand-father now at 75 
years has seen in the last 50 years — 
wonderful as they have been. 

A student reading Chairman Town- 
send's address can hear the sound of 
the coming army in its entire makeup. 
Very truly yours, 
R. A. Burnett & Co.. 
173 S. Water St. 



Medina, Ohio, May 6, 1912. 
Mr. E. B. Tyrrell, Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Sir : Yours of May third has 
been received with regard to the trans- 
fer of the Bee-Keepp:r.s' Review to the 
National Bee-Keepers' Association. I 
heard in a roundabout way that such a 
move was under contemplation, but 
thought best not to say anything about 
it until I got direct confirmation from 
vou. 



I desire to assure you that the same 
cordial relations that have existed in 
the past will continue, so far as we are 
concerned and I know it will be so far 
as you are concerned. Ot course I do 
not know just what your new policies 
will be, but in any event Gleanings 
will endeavor to co-operate with you; 
that is, it hopes to offer a helping hand. 
Whether its competition will be strong- 
er under the new conditions or not 
would make no difference to us. Our 
attitude toward any journal that is 
trying to better the tause of bee-keep- 
ing in the United States should be 
friendly with the idea of the largest 
good to the largest number. 

I have prepared an editorial announc- 
ing the transfer of the American Bee 
Journal to Dadant & Son of Hamilton, 
Illinois, and the transfer of the Bee- 
Keepers' Review to the National Bee- 
Keepers' Association with you as 
managing editor. I think you will like 
what I have said. At all events, I feel 
sure it will not hurt you nor the cause 
of the National Bee-Keepers' Asso- 
ciation. 

Very truly yours, 

The a. I. Root Co., 

E. R. Root, Vice-President. 



Corvallis. Oregon, May 14, 1912. 
Mr. E. B. Tyrrell, Sec'y 

National Bee-Keepers' Association, 
230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Sir : "i'our letter of May 4th 
has just reached me, and I am heartily 
in accord with all it contains. The 
National Association having secured 
the Bee-Keepers' Review will, I be- 
lieve, be a great advancement in asso- 
ciation work. 

Very truly yours, 

H. F. Wilson. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



233 



Hamilton, III, May 7, 1912. 
Friend Tyrrell : 

Yours to hand. No, it was not a 
surprise, for I had been informed of 
what was transpiring and although 
there was nothing positive, it looked 
so plausible that I expected it. 

1 believe we can live side by side 
and help each other. You have seen 
my position at Minneapolis concerning 
the National and I propose to follow it 
up. You will see by the May number 
that I feel like urging all bee-keepers 
to join the National. 

I have no doubt that you will give 
us your support and be friendly. I wish 
to say that the A. B. J. is entirely 
independent of the firm of Dadant & 
Sons, in which I have not been active 
for seven years. 

With best wishes, I remain 
Yours truly, 

C. P. Dadant. 



Fort Edward, N. Y., May 12/12. 
Mr. E. B. Tyrrell, Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Secretary : The Adirondack 
Bee-Keepers' Association held its regu- 
lar spring meeting yesterday (Satur- 
day) and although it is now Sunday I 
feel anxious to tell you of the decision 
we came to in regard the National. 

As secretary, I did all I could to 
make matters perfectly clear to the 
members, using the letter from you, 
also the article in the Review. 

When it was brought to a vote, after 
first debating upon the matter, I had to 
record a unanimous vote in favor of 
staying with the National. 

Yours truly, 
H. E. Gray, Secretary. 



Swarthmore, Pa., May 25, 1912. 
Mr. E. B. Tyrrell: 

Dear Sir : I wish to congratulate 
you on turning the Review over to the 
National Association. The bee-keepers 
have long needed a bee journal de- 
voted to their interests alone. We 
should now make the Review the most 
powerful bee journal in the United 
States if not in the world. 

If there is any literature that I can 
enclose with my regular inquiries for 
catalogue will be pleased to send them 
out if you will provide same. 

Respectfully yours, 

Penn G. Snyder. 



Kno>:. Ind., 5/8/1912. 
Mr. E. B. Tyrrell, Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Secretary : Officers and direc- 
tors in the National Bee-Keepers' Asso- 
ciation are surely an inspiration to 
others or ought to be. They ^are house- 
hold words to bee-keepers.-' 
Yours truly, 

James ' Arnott. 



Columbus, Ohio, May 14, 1912. 
Mr. E. B. Tyrrell,' 

230 Woodland Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Sir : I am glad to have your 
letter of the 9th, and learn of the ex- 
cellent benefits oiTered to members of 
the National Bee-Keepers' Association. 
I feel sure that we will be able, under 
these inducements, to work up a very 
large membership in this state and 
would be very pleased to have a list of 
your Ohio subscribers. Together with 
the president of our association, I ex- 
pect to prepare a circular at once and 
begin a campaign for members. 

When it will not interfere with other 
duties, my apiary inspectors will talk 
membership. The Ohio Association at 
its last meeting passed a resolution 
favorable toward affiliation with the 
National Association. Any further in- 
formation that you can supply us will 
be appreciated. 

Yours very truly, 

N. E. Shaw, Secretary. 



New London, Conn., 5/9/'l912. 
E. B. Tyrrell, Managing Editor, 

230 Woodland Ave., 
Detroit, Mich. 

Dear Sir: Enclosed find postal 
money order for $1.00 being for one 
year's subscription to the Bee-Keepers' 
Review, beginning with the June num- 
ber. I have read your statement of 
the conditions influencing you in the 
sale of the Review to the National As- 
sociation, and the attitude of the direc- 
tors in the purchase of it. I am very 
much pleased and thi^i my first sub- 
scription is intended particularly to 
emphasize my endorsement of this 
action. 

Very truly yours, 

J. M. Graves. 



234 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 



y **■ 9 



t '^•^wiWi| 




NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



With a heavj- winter loss sustained, and with the market now practically bare 
of good- honey as is evidenced by the reports below, the bee-keeper should be able 
to command a pretty good price for his honey this year. We should expect it to 
equal last year's prices at least. 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey 17c to 
18c. Light amber 16c. Amber 15c. Fancy 
white extracted inc to lie. Light amber and 
amber e.xtracted Sc to 9c. Wa.x 30c. 

BL\KE LEE CO.. 
:May 20. 4 Chatham Row. 



DENVER — This market is entirely bare of 
good comb honey. Extracted honey in fair 
supply at following jobbing figures: White 9, 
light amber 8c. strained 6^ to lYzc. 

We pay 26c in cash and 28c in trade for 
clean vellow beeswax delivered here. 

THE COLORADO HONEY 
PRODUCERS' ASSN. 
May 21. F. Raushfuss, Manager. 

CINCINNATI— Market on comb honey is 
about cleaned up and practically no demand. 
E.xtracted honey has fallen otf considerably, 
fancy white table honey in 60-pound cans at 
10 cents, light amber in 60-pound cans at 8 
cents. Amber in barrels dYz cents and 7 cents 
according to quality. Beeswax fair demand at 
$33.00 per hundred. Above are selling prices, 
not what we are paving. 
Mav 21). C. H. W. WEBER CO. 



acter. A No. 1 to fancy comb is unobtainable 
and very little that will pass as No. 1 appears 
on sale. The prices for that are ranging from 
15 to 16c. E.xtracted has not been selling in 
quantity lots and the prices for it range nom- 
inally the same as for some time past, being 
from Sc to 9c for the white, and 7 to 8c for 
the various kinds of amber. Beeswax has been 
in fair supply and brings from 30 to 32c per 
lb. according to color and cleanliness. 

Yours truly, 
Mav 20. R. A. BURNETT & CO. 



TOLEDO — At this writing there is little do- 
ing in honey. Comb is about cleaned up, white 
selling at 10 to 17c per lb.; very little to offer 
at any price. Extracted white clover sells in 
small way at 10c, light amber 8c. Beeswax is 
quiet with slock coming in freely and sells at 
from 30 to 32c. 
Mav 20. S. T. GRIGGS & CO. 



K.\.NS.\S CITY — No new comb honey on 
our market and no old comb in jobbers' hands. 
Some little extracted which we quote at 8c to 
9c a lb. We quote beeswa.x at 25c to 28c a lb. 

Yours trulv. 
Mav 20. C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 



CINCINNATI— The trade in honey during 
the past week has been of a very limited char- 



CINCINNATI— This market is now clean 
and bare of comb honey, and we are pleased to 
note this fact for it gives the consumer an op- 
portunity to refreshen his appetite for the big 
fine crop that is sure to come this season. The 
demand for extracted honey has slackened 
somewhat and we are awaiting the arrival of 
the new crop. We are selling amber honey in 
barrels at 6^c to 7^c a pound, and the finest 
quality at 8^ to 10c a pound, according to the 
quality and quantity purchased. For bright 
yellow, choice beeswax, we are paying 30c a 
lb. delivered here, in cash, and 2c a lb. more 
in trade; for darker grades than the above, we 
are paying 28c or 29c. 

THE FRED. W. MUTH CO. 
"The Busy Bee Men." 
Mav 22. 51 Walnut Street. 



NEW YORK — Since our last, there has been 
no material change in the condition of the 
honey market; we really have nothing new to 
report. It is rather early as yet for new crop 
from the South, it may be a couple of weeks 
longer before we will receive any. Some little 
lots of comb honey are still coming in and find 
ready sale at former prices. The market on 
extracted is very quiet, and prices have a down- 
ward tendency all along the line. New crop 
from the West Indies is now arriving quite 
freely, and no doubt shipments will increase 
in quantity as the season progresses. Beeswax 
steady at from 30c to 32c per pound, according 
to qualitv. Yours verv truly. 

May 20.' HILDRETH & SEGELKEN. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



235 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 



BEES AND QUEENS. 

Golden Italian Queens, Nuclei, and full 
colonies. See price-list in May Review, page 
197. Isaac F. Tillinghast, Factory ville, Pa. 

For Sale. — Full colonies and nuclei. W. S. 
Frazeur, Stand 2.59, City Market, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. 



Our Queens will please you. C. W. Phelps 
& Son, Dealers in Beekeepers' supplies, Bing- 
hampton, N. Y. 

Colonies of Italian Bees in L. hives, 10- 
fr., full of stores — any time. Jos. Wallrath, 
Antioch, Cal. 

For Sale. — Bees, queens and supplies. Pure- 
blooded poultry and eggs, way below standard 
prices. A. M. Applegate, Reynoldsville, Pa. 

Nutmeg Italian Queens, after June 1, $1.00. 
Circular. A. W. Yates, 3 Chapman St., Hart- 
ford, Ct. 

Front Line Italian Queens, well bred and 
hardy. After June 1st, 6 for $4.50. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. J. B. Hollopeter, Pentz, 
Pa. 

Italian Queens. — Three band strain only. 
Tested $1.00 each; Untested $0.75; $7.00 per 
dozen. No disease. Send for price list. 

J. \V. K. Shaw & Co., Loreauville, La. 

Queens and Nuclei. — A strain of Italians 
developed for honey-gathering ability. My en- 
tire time has been given to them for 12 years. 
W. D. AcHORD, Fitzpatrick, Bullock Co., Ala. 

Choice Italian Queens, delivery beginning 
April 15. Untested, 75 cts. ; tested, $1.00. Ten 
years' experience in queen-rearing. Send your 
orders now. F. Hughes, Gillett, Ark. 

Queens. — Mott's strain of Italians and Car- 
niolans. Bees by pound, nuclei, len-page list 
free. Plans for Introducing Queens, 15 cts.; 
How to Increase, 15 cts.; both, 25 cts. E. E. 
MoTT, Glenwood, Mich. 



Italian and Carnolan Queens — Nucleus and 
full colonies; bees bj' the pound; apiaries in- 
spected for brood diseases; bee supplies; write 
for circular. Frank M. Keith, S3>4 Florence 
St., Worcester, Mass. 



Bees and Queens — Italian Queens at 75c, 
$8.00 a dozen" tested $1.00, $"l0.00 a dozen, 
Cyprians, Carniolians, Caucasians or Banats at 
$1.00. tested $1.25; 2-5 gal. cans. 5Sc; 1 lb. 
bottles, $3.75 per gross; bees, supplies and 
honey. Walter C. Morris, 74 Cortlandt St., 
New York City. 



Northern Bred Hardy Queens of Moore's 
strain of Italians ready the last of June; un- 
tested, $1.00 each; 5 for $6.00; 12 for $9.00. 
Orders filed and filled in turn. P. B. Ramer, 
Harmony, Minn. 

N'ermont Queens .^nd Bees — Three-banded 
Italian-Howe strain crossed with best honey 
gatherers I ever owned. $1.00, untested; 6 for 
$5.00; nuclei, $1.00 per frame. Add price of 
queen. H. William Scott, Barre, \'ermont. 

Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 

Finest Quality of 3 band Italian queen, 
reared in the 59th latitude. Tested: Tune, 
$3.00; July, $2.50; Aug., $2.00. Breeder: June, 
$6.00; July, $5.00; Aug., $4.00. Doz., 25% 
discount. Alexander Lundgren, 12 Tomte- 
bogatan, Stockholm, Sweden. 

For Sale. — Moore's strain and golden Italian 
queens, untested, $1.00; six, $5.00; twelve, $9.00. 
Carniolan, Banat, and Caucasian queens, select, 
$1.25; six, $6.00; twelve, $10.00. Tested, any 
kind, $1.50; six, $8.00. Choice breeders, $3.00. 
Circular free. W. H. Rails, Orange, Cal. 

Golden Queens. — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, five 
and six band, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also 
nuclei and full colonies. Send for circular and 
price list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

If you wish the best of untested three- 
banded Italian queens send us your orders — 
75 cents each, $S.00 per dozen. Safe arrival 
and satisfaction. No order too small nor too 
large to receive our prompt attention. The 
Golden Rule Bee Co., Rt. 1, Box 103, River- 
side, Cal. 

Golden and 3-Banded Italians. — lested, $1 
each. 3 (queens $2.75; 6 or more, 85c each. 
Untested, 75c each; 3 queens, $2; 6 or more, 
65c each. Bees per pound, $1. Nuclei, per 
frame, $1.25. (No disease here.) C. B. 
Bankston, Buffalo, Texas. 

Quirin's famous improved Italian queens, 
nuclei, colonies, and bees by the pound, ready 
in May. Our stock is northern-bred and 
hardy; five yards wintered on summer stands 
in 1908 and 1909 without a single loss. For 
prices, send for circular. Quirin-the-Queen- 
Breeder, Bellevue, O. 

Our Golden Italian Queens produce the 
brightest and gentlest golden bees that we ever 
had; great honey-gatherers, and not bad rob- 
bers. Our three-hand are the best of their 
kind. Price of either, untested. $1.00; tested, 
$2.00; breeders, $3.00. We will make a very 
low price later in the season. C. W. Phelps 
& Sox, Dealers in beekeepers' supplies, Bing- 
hampton, N. Y. 



You get best RESULTS from our 
Classified Liner Columns. — Try them. 



236 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



HONEV AND WAX. 



I WANT comb honey, white or light amber, 
at once. O. N. Baldwin, Baxter Springs, 
Kansas. 

Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. ' HiLDRETH & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 



Honey Cans for Sale — 5-gallon, 60-lb., 
square, screw top cans, used only once; good 
as new; in crates; send quick best cash offer; 
any number delivered. Hilltop Pure Food 
Co., Ltd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Selling Out. — Danzenbaker hives and su- 
pers, new and second hand; also bees in either 
dovetailed or Danzenbaker hives. S-frame 
dovetailed hives, including Italian queen and 
bees $4.00 each. 10-frame Danzenbaker or 
dovetailed hives, including Italian queen and 
bees, $5.00 each. Reason, other large interests 
consume my time. R. B. Chipman, Clifton 
Heights, Del. Co., Pa. 



MISCEI^I^ANEOVS. 



For Sale — 1 Yz h. p. Associated Mfg. Co.'s 
gasoiine-engine in good condition; $20.00 takes 
it. M. C. SiLSBEE, Rt. 3, Cohocton, N. V. 

Rubber Stamps made to order. Breeder of 
Leghorns, W. Wyandotts. Jeff ^L^comber, 
Gaylord, ^lich. 

Wanted — Second-hand honey extractor, ilust 
be cheap. Bee-Keeper, 1831 Fremont Ave., 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton, Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 

For Sale. — Second hand 8-frame hives, sec- 
tions, shipping cases, (iO-lb. cans, brood combs, 
foundation and wa.x, cheap. O. N. B.\ldvvin, 
Baxter Springs, Kansas. 

Wanted — Every bee-keeper to try a Boyum 
foundation fastener. See adv. on page 1G3 
May issue or send for circulars. Address, The 
BoYUM Api.\ries Co., Rushford, Minn., U. S. A. 

For Sale. — Vogeler process comb founda- 
tion, 10 frame redwood hive bodies 2oc each, 
and poultry supplies. J. Stansfield, Fruitvale, 
Calif. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 

For Sale. — Empty second-hand 60-lb. cans, 
as good as new, two cans to a case, at 25 cts. 
per case. C. H. W. Weber & Co., 

Cincinnati, O. 

Penna. Bee Keepers: Having bought supply 
business of Geo. H. Rea, can furnish complete 
line of Roots goods. Full car just in; catalog 
free. Thos. H. Litz, Osceola Mills, Pa. 

For Sale. — A brand-new Kenmore automo- 
bile, used only for demonstrating. Can be used 
for delivery or pleasure car. Will sell at a bar- 
gain. Louis Werner, Edwardsville, 111. 



REAIi ESTATE. 

Wanted. — House on 3 acres in good locality 
for bee-keeping, North-west Michigan preferred. 
Cash transaction. Address with full particu- 
lars. L. BiGELOw, Box 273, Renfrew, Ontario. 

For Rent. — 160-acre ranch with 35 stands of 
bees, 25 head of horses, and 10 milk cows. 
All fenced, good water and near school. James 
J. Cook, Real Ettate, Whiterocks, Utah. 



FOUIiTBV. 

Sicilian Buttercups — Eggs for hatching; 
circular free. D. S. Durall, Hurdland, Mo. 

Partridge Wyandottes. — Adapted to any 
climate; eggs and stock for sale. C. M. Myers, 
Winchester, Ind. 

Indian Runner Ducks, dark fawn, hardy, 
great foragers, heavy layers, pure white eggs 
15 for $1.00; 100, $5.00. Wm. Stumm, Edin- 
burg. 111. 

Pigeons! Pigeons! — Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
our specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Prize-winning S. C. R. I. Reds, thorough- 
bred White Orpington, Barred Plymouth Rocks, 
Indian Runner ducks, fawn and white; white 
egg strain; eggs. Day old ducks. David M. 
Ha.mmond, Woodside Poultry Yards, Rt. 5, 
Cortland, N. Y. 

Real Bargains — In stock 2-lb. pullets, chicks, 
eggs; heavy laving barred rocVs, S. C. R. I. 
Reds, S. C. White Leghorns, Pekin Ducks; the 
kind we all want; don't go on a strike all 
winter; catalog free. Crystal Spring Farm, 
Rt. 2, Lititz, Pa. 

Eggs— From Houdans, Buff P. Rocks, White 
Wyandottes, Buff and Black Orpingtons, Buff 
Leghorns, R. C. B. Leghorns, R. I. Reds; eggs 
$1.50 per 15, $2.75 per 30, $4.00 per 45: 
Bronze Turkeys' eggs, $2.50 per 11, $4.50 per 
22. Address A. F. Firestone, Broadwell, 
Ohio, Athens Co. 



How to "Boil Down" Your Contributions. 

(Continued from page 224.) 

have done all this, re-write your article and you will be surprised 
how much vou have shortened the article and still have not taken 



a single thins 



of value from it. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



237 



BEE-KEEPERS 



Look up your stock at once and .semi 
me a list of the supplies you need. 1 
have a large stock to draw from to 
handle your orders for Hives. Sections, 
Com'b Foundation, etc.; standard goods 
witli latest improvements fresli from 
the factory at factory schedule of 
prices. 1 have a general line of Roct'.s 
Goods constantly on liand. My facili- 
tie-! for serving you are unequalled. 

Beeswax taken in exchange for sup- 
plies or tash. 

Italian Bees and Queens 
Be SLire you have niy lltli' Catalog of 

Bees. Queens and Supi)lies. 
EARIi M. NICHOIiS, Iiyonsville, Mass. 

Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

Bright, Powerl'ul, Economical, 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in your home. If your 
dealer hasn't got thein, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
many as you want at 2.5c each. 
AGENTS WANTED EVERY- 
WM KRK. 

THE STEEL MANTLE LIGHT CO. 

■.i-.^i Huron St.. Toledo. O. 




Medium red, large red, alfalfa. Sweet clo- 
ver and grass seeds in general; also 
SEED CORN 
Several varieties and tlioroughbred. Write 
for prices and catalog apiary supplies. All 
seeds of high purity. 

F. A. SIVEI.I,. 
Carroll Co. Milleilseville, III. 

Bargains in Bee Supplies. 

The recent death of James Ileddon leaves 
us with a large amount of Bee Fixtures and 
Supplies of almost every description, which 
will be sold at a great sacrifice. Write us for 
inventory and write at once, as these goods 
will not last long at the prices we are closing 
them out at. 

JAMES HEDDON'S SONS, 
Do^va^cinc. 3Iiclii^an. 

THE 

SWARTHMORE APIARIES 

The late E. L. Pratt's Celebrated Gentil 

GOLDEN ALL OVER QUEENS 

PEDIGREED 

PENN G. SNYDER, State Apiary lospeclor 



Rear Your Own Queens. 

Send vour address and learn IIOW TO 
COMIHNE TMK REST FEATURES OF ALL 
S^'STEMS, or send .50 cents for EUREKA 
LARX'A TRANSPLAN'lER and full .lirec- 
ticr,-^. Satisfaction guaranteed. 
MARK W. MOE, 
1714 Exposition Ave., Denver, Colo. 



'Grig-gs Saves yoii Preiglit." 



TOLEDO 

For me! Is every bee-man"s guide when 
he wishes goods quick. 

Big stock Root's goods ready to shi)! 
same day order is received. 

Wholesale prices on Chick Feed, Beef 
Sciaji, ("irit. Shells, etc. 

Honey and Beeswax wanted. 

Catalogue Free. 

S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 

26 N. Erie St. 



W. H. Laws 

will be ready to take care of your queen 
orders, whether large or small, the coming 
season. Twenty-five years of careful breed- 
ing brings Laws' queens above the usual 
standard; better let us book your orders 
now. 

Tested queens in March; untested, after 
April 1st. About 50 first-class breeding- 
queens ready at any date. 

Prices: Tested, $1.25; 5 for $5.00; Breed- 
ers, each $5.00. Address 

W. H. Laivs, Beeville, Texas. 



USE THIS COUPON 

M. H. HINT & SON 

(;eneral Agents for Root's Goods 
Lansing, Mich. 

Dear Sirs: — 

Please quote me your prices on the at- 
tached list of bee supplies 1 need. Also 
send me your G4-page catalog, and a 
complimentary copy of "The Bee Keeper 
and The Fruit Grower." 



Name . 



Addre-ss. 



R. 1!. Chipman of Clifton Heights, Pa., a 
well-known bee-keeper of Delaware Cou.ity. 
Pa., owing to his wife's death, is breaking up 
his home and disposing of his bees. His stock 
of queens came from the late Pratt's "golden 
all over" queens of Swarthmore, Pa. 

He has, also, Danzenbaker and Dovetailed 
liives and supers with good Italian stock. 
S-frame colonies, $4.00; 10-frame, $5.00. 



238 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



SATISFACTORY 

RESULTS 

Will be obtained by using MANU- 
FACTURED COMB FOUNDATION, 
which embodies PURITY, TOUGH- 
NESS, TRANSPARENCY, COLOR and 
the PURE BEES WAX ODOR of the 
NATURAL COMB as made by the 
HONEY BEE. 



SUCH IS THE 

DITTMER PROCESS 
COMB FOUNDATION 

Send for Samples. 

All other Bee Keepers' Supplies at 
prices you will appreciate. We will be 
pleased to send you our 1912 Catalog, 
for the asking. 



Gus Dittmer Co, 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



PORTER BEE ESCAPE 




SAVES 
TIME HONEY MONEY 

15o each, $1.05 <Ioz. All Dealers. 

Maiiiifactiii'eil only by 

II. 4$: E. C. POUTER, LewLstown, 111. 



CARNIOLAN QUEENS 

SUPERIOR LINE BRED STRAIN 

Prices for U. S., Canada, Mexico, 

Cuba. 
Select untested, June, July, .\ug., 

Sept., $1.0() each, $9.00 doz. 
Select tested, June, July, -Vug., 

Sept., $1.51) each, $1:.'.00 doz. 
Ask for prices in lots of SO or more. 
Write for our paper "Superiority of the 
Carniolan Bee," giving description, best 
methods of management, system of breed- 
ing, etc. It's free. 

AI.BKRT (i. H.4NN 
.Srienliflc Queen Breeder, I*itts(<i\vn, N. J 




SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufadturing Sedions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 



A 



MEXICO AS 
BEE COUNTRY 



B. A. Hadsell, one of the largest bee-keepers 
in the world, has made six trips to Mexico, 
investigating that country as a bee country, 
and is so infatuated with it that he is closing 
out his bees in Arizona. He has been to great 
expense in getting up a finely illustrated 32- 
page booklet describing the tropics of Mexico 
as a Bee Man's Paradise, which is also su- 
perior as a farming, stock raising and fruit 
country, where mercury ranges between 55 
and 98. Frost and sun-stroke is unknown. 
Also a gri-al health resort. He will mail this 
book free by atldressing 

B. A. HADSELL, Lititz, Pa. 



WANTED— BEESWAX 

Will ]iay highest price. 

Cash on arrival. 

Drop us a postal 

hii.i>bz:th & si:gi:i.ki:n 

265-267 Greenwich St., 
New York, N. Y. 



Established in 1878 

Itulisu C'liiiciiMiiin 

I will sell a limited number of one, two and 
three-frame nuclei this coming season. "The 
best bees on earth," broad statement but never- 
theless true. 100% wintered. By the way, I 
am breeding queens in Houston Heights, Texas, 
as well as here in Michigan. All apiaries isol- 
ated. Prices right, and sent free. 

A. D. D. WOOD 

Kox <;i, I.aiisiiiK', ]>Iich. 

Ko.\ X'2, lloii.stou Heig'lit.s, T('.A:a.s. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



239 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young bassvvood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 



RUSH orders for 



^^ 



falcon 



ft 



o lb. 

5(1 lb. 

5 lb. 

j(i lb. 



BEE SUPPLIES 

fjiiick price-list. 

iiKKi lieeway sectimis $.5.50, .5M, $23.7.5 
Plain sections 2.5c per M less. 

per lb. 
light s.clion foundation ... iJ4c 
light section foundation .. .;5i)c 
Medium brood foundation ,57c 
Medium brood foundation .52c 
]()il Hoffman brood frames $3.00. 
10 No. 14 1-story Dtd. Hives, Cover, 
10 No. 14 1-story Dtd. Hives, cover, 
bottom, body and frames, 8- 
frame $13. .50, 10-frame $15.00. 
Dovetailed supers with inside fix- 
tures but no sections or starters, 8- 
frame, 5, $2.50; 10, $4.80; 10-frame, 
5, $2.75; 10, $5.30. 

Condensed Rush Order directions, 
sections and supers — Give dimensions 
of s;ctions. Hives and supers, state 
whether S-frame or Ifl-frame. 

Order any article not mentioned, 
send money and we will even up with 
foundation. The best price will be 
given for every article with the "FAL- 
CON" guarantee of satisfaction. 

W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

Il'hcre the good bcc-hives come from. 
Factory, Falconer, N. Y. 







o 








Look for the 


r 


Control Swarmings. 






20th Century 


• 


Control mis - mating 
of queens. 






Invention in 




Trap out the drones. 
Ventilate the hive. 






this space next 




Stop robbing. 






issue. 




All done as easy as it is 
said \vith the 






SCHATvl 


[U I 


NVENTION 




Liverpool, N. Y. 



240 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



When You Buy Lewis Beeware 
You Get... 



LKWIS Q,UAI>ITY — Which means that all Lewis Hives are made out of elcar white 
pine, and l>ewis sections made out of fine bright basswood. The material in these 
goods is the best obtainable and selected by experts. 

LKWIS WORKMAIVSHIP — The Lewis factory is ecpiipped with the latest improved 
machinery constantly watched over by experts. The I^ewis head mechanic has 
had thirty-five years of bee supply experience, the superintendent of bee hive de- 
partment twenty-nine years, the superintendent of sections twenty-eight years. 
These and many other skilled men have a hand in all the Lewis goods you buy. 

LKWIS PACKIXG — All Lewis Beeware is carefully and accurately packed — a patent 
woven w'ood and w-ire package made only by the Lewis Company, is employed largely 
in packing — this makes the package light, compact and damage-proof. 

LiEWIS SERVICE — Years ago all goods were shipped direct from the factory with 
attending high freight rates and delays during the honey season — now Lewis Bee- 
ware can be obtained almost at your own door. Over thirty distributing houses 
carrying Lewis Beeware by the carload are dotted all over the Lhiited States and 
foreign countries. Write for the name of the one nearest you. 

G. B. LEWIS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Beeware WATERTOWN, WIS. 



Make Your Own Hives 

Ree Keepers will save money by using our Foot 

" SAWS 

in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

"' W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 

384 Ruby Street, Rockford, Illinois. 





"If goods are wanted quick, send to Poudcr." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
JMy equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 
excelled. 

PAPER HONEY JARS 

For extracted honey. Afade of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis, Ind. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 



The 

National Bee -Keepers' Association 



.WILL FURNISH YOU 




Quality Cans 

At Wholesale Prices. Standard Sizes. 

Here we are with a standard can. Something you 
have never had before. Of course, you had .sixty- 
pound cans, but did you ever know what size those 
cans would be, what weight of tin they were made 
of, or what kind of a box they would be placed in 
for shipment? Of course, you didn't. You simply 
had to order sixty-pound cans and take what you got. 
Sometimes you did not get a very good can. Some- 
times the box was not strong enough to stand ship- 
ment without breakage. Sometimes you paid a big 
price for those cheap cans in the loss of honey you 
sustained through leakage. 

All Cans are carefully soldered and tested with 
compressed air under water to prevent the possible 
shipment of leakers. 

Weight of Tin used on above Cans to be not less 
than 100 lbs. per base box of 112 sheets 14 x 20 inches. 

NOTE THE INNER SEAL 

Under the present pure food laws, if you ship your honey from one State to another, 
you must guarantee its purity. With nothing but a screw cap on your cans, how do you 
know your honey would not be tampered with after it left you and before it reached the 
buyer? We are furnishing you this year a can having an inner seal. This inner seal costs 
you nothing extra and can be used or not. If used, it does not interfere with the regular 
screw cap, but when once in place it cannot be removed without destroying it. This prevents 
your honey being tampered with without detection, for, of course, after the inner seal is 
destroyed the buyer will know it is not as it left you. This certainly is an important con- 
sideration, and is furnished free on all cans ordered through the National Association. 





Send for circular giving prices, freight rates and full description to The NATIONAIi 
BEE-KEEFESS' ASSOCIATION, 230 WOOSI^AITD AVE., DETROIT, IVIICHiaAN 




-es 3o 



ROOT'S 

BEEKEEPERS 
SUPPLIES 




You may have a catalog of supplies; but if you haven't ours for 1912 you have missed 
something really worth while, and should get one at once. It is the largest and most complete 
ever published — more than a mere price list of supplies — a book that every beekeeper can read 
with pleasure and profit. Beginners will find answers to many perplexing questions, and ad- 
vanced beekeepers timely suggestions that will save them money. Old customers are writing us 
frequently letters like the following: 

Your catalog for 1912, designated ROOT'S BEEKEEPERS' SUPPLIES, is received, 
and I certainly thank you for this book. I have had your catalog on my desk for 
years, and have used Root's supplies all along. I note the enlargement and improve- 
ment in your new catalog, and notice many things I expect to add to my apiary. 

Crystal City, Texas. C. W. Cox. 

Our catalog this season also gives a full and complete list of books and booklets which we 
can supply. Many of these booklets are free, which doesn't mean that they are not worth read- 
ing, but simply that we want you to be informed on the subjects of which they treat. Send for a 
catalog, and check those in which you are interested. 



Quick Deliveries 



Next to having the best goods made, there is nothing so important to the beekeeper in the 
busy season as to have goods delivered just when they are wanted most. It isn't always possible 
to ship goods from a distant factory and have them reach destination within a day or two, as 
is sometimes necessary during the height of the season, but with distributing-houses located in 
the large shipping-centers we are able to supply beekeepers everywhere, with no loss of time 
and with minimum transportation charges. 



Send Your Hurry Orders 



to any one of the offices listed below, and let us show you what we can do for you in point of 
service. Cars are going to these branches at the rate of two or three a week, so the stocks are 
new and fresh, and we usually have just what you want. If it isn't in stock at your nearest 
branch our manager will include your order with his specifications and you may have your goods 
come in the next car, thereby saving on transportation charges and getting the goods in better 
shape than you would by local freight. 



Whatever Your Wants 



we can supply you, and, of course, there is no question about the quality of our goods. The 
name "ROOT" in connection with bee-supplies means the best of every thing in this line, and 
the best is always the cheapest, as our customers will testify. If you have never used our 
supplies you should make a trial of them this season. Once used, we are sure you will want 
no other. 

I have just received my goods, order No. 10,739. I am more than pleased with 
them. I had intended to make my hives, but when I received the sample hive and saw 
the No. 1 pine lumber from which it was made, and considering the workmanship, I am 
satisfied I can buy cheaper than I can make them; enough cheaper to save the price of 
the lumber. O. C. Mills, Barton Ldg., Vt. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

New York, 139-141 Franklin St. Chicag-o, 213-231 Institute Place 

Fliiladelphia, 8-10 Vine St. Des Moines, 565 W. Seventh St. 

St. Paul, 1024 Mississippi St. Syracuse, 1631 Genesee St. 

Washing'ton, IICO Maryland Ave. S-'W. 
Mechanic Falls, Maine 




Distributing' Depots in Many 
Iiarg'e Centers 

The A. I. Root Company 

Executive Offices and Factory 

MEDINA, OHIO 




THE CHAS. F, MAY CO., PRINTCBS, DETROIT, M ICH. 







Published MonthJt[ 



wMmmmM 



JULY 
1912 

▼" 'v ▼ 

DfTROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 



This Big Touring Car $1600 



Completely Equipped 






A Classy big" car — that will fairly fly over the roads. De- 
signed for the utmost comfort and attractiveness. Five 
passeng'er capacity. 




SEIiF-STABTER, TOO. 



^ The special features of the Cartercar make this the best 
popular priced touring car value on the market. It has the 
patented Friction Transmission which makes it far superior 
to any gear driven car from an efficiency standpoint. It 
will climb a 50% grade — has any number of speeds — one 
lever control — no jerks or jars — and without the usual gears. 
^ Four other excellent models. They are every one lead- 
ers in their class. Full floating rear axle, valve encased 
motor, three quarter rear elliptic springs, and all modern 
ideas. Let us send you catalog. 

Cartercar Company 

Pontiac, Michigan 

BRANCHES: NEW VOBK, CHICACrO, DETROIT, KANSAS CZT-S-. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 241 

Perfection in Wax Rendering 

HAS BEEN REACHED BY OUR PROCESS. 
Ship Us Your 

Old Comb and Cappings 

And Secure Highest Returns. 

Write for prices and full information. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO. 

" The Busy Bee Men " 
51 Walnut St. CINCINNATI, O. 

Comb and Extracted Honey Wanted. 



White Comb Honey 

Fancy and No. 1. 

We Need Large Quantities and 
Can Use Yours 

WRITE US 

American Butter & Cheese Co. 

31-33 Griswold St. Detroit, Mich. 



242 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



the: coast line 



CiTYorD, 



"^tr,, 



■°l>ll 






DETROIT 

CLEVELAND 
BUFFALO 

NIAGARA FALLS 



TOLEDO 
PT. HURON 

GODERICH 
ALPENA ST.ICNACE 



THE CHARMS OF OUR SUMMER SEAS 

Spend your vacation on the Great Lakes, the most economical and enjoyable outing in America, 
WHERE YOU CAN GO 
Daily service is operated between Detroit and Cleveland, Detroit and Buffalo; four trips 
weekly between Toledo, Detroit, Mackinac Island and way ports; daily service between 
Toledo, Cleveland and Put-in-Bay. During July and August, two boats out of Cleveland and 
Detroit, every Saturday and Sunday night. 

A Cleveland to Mackinac special steamer will be operated two trips weekly from June 15th to 
September 10th, stopping only at Detroit every trip and Goderich, Ont., every other trip. 
Railroad Tickets Available on Steamers. Special Day Trips Between 
Detroit and Cleveland, During July and August. 

Send 2 cent stamp for Illustrated Pamphlet and Great Lakes Map. 
Address: L. G. Lewis, G. P. A., Detroit, Mich. 
Philip H. McMillan, Pres. A. A. Schantz, Gen'l Mgr, 

Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company 



r^c^^v^^^^rv^^c^c^^^^^^c^:^^^^:^-^^v'v^ 



I. Schantz, Gen'l Mgr. '' , 

ipany K 



Special Delivery 

During this month we shall double our usual efforts in points of delivery and service. 
Early indications not having been most favorable, it is possible many beekeepers will not 
liave laid in a sufficient stock of supplies, such as sections and foundation, for the clover 
and basswood this m.onth. We are prepared to make up for this oversight by having a 
large stock of both sections and foundations on hand for instant delivery. We carry 
nothing but the Root make, which insures the best quality of everything. We sell at 
factory prices, thereby insuring a uniform rate to everyone. The saving on transportation 
charges from Cincinnati to points south of us will mean quite an item to beekeepers in 
this territory. We are so located that we can make immediate shipment of any order 
the day it is received. 

Honey and Wax 

If you haven't made arrangements for the disposition of your honey and wax lor 
this season, consult us. We buy both in large quantities, and can assure you of fair 
and courteous treatment, and a good price for your crop. 



Shipping-cases 




C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 



2 1 46 Central Ave. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



243 



IF BEES COULD TALK 

They Would Say : 

"GIVE US 

'Dadant's Foundation' 



ITS CLEAN, IT'S PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES 



If you are not using "DAD ANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DADANT & SON S, fLr/i^^*?^: 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 



BINGHAM SMOKERS 

Insist on Old Reliable Bingham Bee Smokers; for sale by all 
dealers in bee-keepers' supplies. For over 30 years the standard 
in all countries. The smoker with a valve in the bellows, 
direct draft, bent cap, inverted bellows and soot-burning device. 

Smoke Engine, 4-inch each $1.25; mail, $1.50 

Doctor, 3J/2-inch each .85; mail, 1.10 

Conquerer, 3-inch each .75; mail, 1.00 

Little Wonder, 2-inch each .50; mail, .65 

Honey Knife each .70; mail, .80 

Manufactured only by 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

Grand Raoids, 3Ii<-li. 




Protection Hive 

The best and lowest price hive on the market. This 
hive has Ys material in the outer wall, and is not 
cheaply made of }i material like some other hives on 
the market. Send for circular showing 12 large illus- 
trations. It will pay you to investigate. 

A. G. WOODMAN CO., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 




244 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




(established 1888) 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 

NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSOCIATION 
Office OF Pu BLiCATioN - - - 230 Woodlan d Aven u e 

VOL, XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, JULY 1, 1912. No. 7. 

Something About Cuba by a Resident of That 

Country. 

D. W. MILLAR. 

' ■'Jl'T is a pleasure to give you a few truths about Cuba, the richest 
Jm little country, with the most ideal climate in the world. Alany 
northern people have a wrong idea about Cuba, thinking it is 
too hot or too far away or a dozen and one other things, although 
in many cases they have never been here. It takes just three days 
from Havana to Xew York, and twelve hours to Key West, either 
way being a most pleasant and restful trip, as the service is fine. It 
never gets as hot as you have it, the average temperature in winter 
being 79, and in summer about 90, and the humidity is not nearly 
so high as in the north. The nights are always cool,, and you never 
care to sleep without some covering; there is always a cool breeze 
blowing during the day, but it never gets cold enough for a frost. 

'Most anything will grow the year around, and there are thous- 
ands of acres of the richest virgin soil still available here at $5 per 
acre up, according to location. The average cost of uncleared land 
in an English speaking colony where there are schools, churches, 
etc., as at Bartle, is about $50.00 per acre, and titles are gilt-edge, but 
price ridiculous. The average country Cuban is untrustworthy and 
is satisfied with an existence if he don't have to work for it. It is 
second nature with the average uneducated native to steal, and the 
country people are usually illiterate and among themselves most 
immoral, but to Americans friendlv, on the surface, and a most hos- 
pitable people so far as their ability and comprehension will permit. 
The government is rotten, and no doubt should be short-lived. 



246 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Everybody wants to be president, and l)nt few are capable or hon- 
est enough to merit such honor. Foreigners will be in no danger 
vvheiT Uncle Sam is again forced to step in and take up the reins, in 
my opinion. 

EXPORTS, IMPORTS AND RESOURCES. 

Cuba's exports are about equal her imports, and much is 
shipped here that could easily be produced. For instance last year 
she imported of potatoes $1,250,000, milk $1,1?(;,043. flour $3,688,000, 
lard $4,154,863, hams .$(;00,035, wines $2,000,000, cotton goods, $10,- 
500,000, shoes $3,500,000 all of which with the possible exception of 
flour could be produced or manufactured here but of course it would 
take capital. 

Cuba has the richest iron mines in the world, and the largest 
sugar mill, capacity 5i33,000 bags of 32'5 lbs. each. Sugar is king 
here, exportations last year being $121,000,000. Tobacco comes next 
with exports last season amounting to $35,000,000. There are also 
many large cattle ranches, as there is plenty of grass the year 
around, and no other feed is required. Xot much is done in hog 
raising, although nature produces an abundance of good food, and 
they are always worth 10 to 14 cents a pound on the hoof. This 
is a good business as you will see by the importations of lard and 
hams. Eggs are always worth five cents each in the cities, and. 
poultry does well if properly handled. There is nothing in raising 




A Cuban Hotel at Bartle. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



247 




Riding Through Mr. Nickcrson's Orange Grove, near Bartle. 

northern vegetables and small stuff here at present, except for one's 
own use, but good money can be made raising plantain, yams and 
yucca, which the natives eat, and which are superior to our Irish 
potatoes when one becomes accustomed to them, and knows how 
to prepare them properly to eat. Bananas do not do v/ell. Coffee 
is good, but cocoa is not profitable; two and three crops of corn 
can be raised yearly, but the yield is light. 

CITRUS FRUITS. 

This year has opened up the eyes of many skeptics who had 
little faith in citrus fruit groves, and the returns prove beyond a 
doubt the big profits that are possible, and anyone with a few acres 
of good land properlv planted and cared for until five years old, will 
be independent. 

Some have just now reached this stage. Mr. T. R. Towns, of 
Holguin. oft'ers for sale 3(35 days in a year grape fruit, etc., and is 
making monthly shipments all over the world. He has no patent 
on this, and others can with the same energy he has expended do 
likewise, and the meaning of this is apparent. 

Bees work .365 days in a year here, and never ha\e to be fed. 
A colony will produce from 15 to •?() gallons yearly at 50 cents a 
gallon to say nothing of your increase and queens if you go into the 
whole thing. Fruit trees and bees go together. The bees are good 



248 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



in polonizing the trees 
and will bring in some- 
thing" to live on from 
the start, and are easily 
handled. 

SOME OF THE DRAW- 
BACKS. 

When one says there 
are many good oppor- 
tunities in Cuba, it is 
not true. There are 
n.one worth taking 
chances on for the 
])(ior man. He is far 
l)etter off in the north. 
If one understands 
Spanish well he can 
get a,long, but if not 
he must, to pay him 
for coming, have money 
enough to live on until 
he gets over the idea 
of revolutionizing the 
island and showing 
the natives and old- 
timers how they should 
do things like they do 
up north, and after — 
if he don't go home — 
to finance whatever he 
undertakes until it pays 
out. If one has plenty 
of money it is a fine 
place to live part of 
the time, and one could by exercising care make no mistake, in my 
mind, in investing now, for we will be under the protection of the 
Stars and Stripes before long, I hope, and if duties are removed, as 
we expect, this country will be only too small. 

Our railway service is very poor, but of course will improve 
v/ith everything else, as we learn. It is quite convenient to speak 
Spanish. If one locates in an English community and goes into 
agriculture, he acquires a working knowledge of it very quickly, 
but to go into business or when you must transact business with 
Spanish speakers it is ver}- necessary to understand, for they will 
take advantage of you in every wa}^, and they are as clever as they 



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What a Four Year Old Orange Tree did for Mr. Powell. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



249 



make them. There are always plenty of interpreters, but you can't 
always trust them. In the cities scarcely any important store is 
today without someone who speaks English, and the hotels also are 
adopting it in many places. The better classes are sendmg their child- 
ren to English-speaking schools, either here in Cuba or in the States. 
It is expected that during the coming summer a large new col- 
lege will be erected at Bartle for the higher branches in both Eng- 
lish and Spanish. Oriente province, in which Bartle is located, is 
the richest in Cuba, although not developed as is the western end of 
the island. Any young man with a little capital can, if he gets 
good land at the right price, come here and if he sticks to his knit- 
ting in a few years be independent. Living is not expensive, and it 
takes little for clothes, as you see from the cut, for but few are 
worn in the countrv districts. 



NOT A GOOD COUNTK.Y 

POR NORTHERN" WOMEN 

AND CHIIiDREN. 

Outside the large 
cities Cuba at present 
is no place for wo- 
men, as it would soon 
pall on one with any 
taste for refinement, 
and it is, in the rural 
districts, a poor place 
to bring up children, 
as they pick up the 
language quickly and 
cannot help hearing on 
all sides the vilest talk 
imaginable. 

The average horse 
is very poor, and good 
horses or mules bring 
fancy prices. 

The wild fruit of 
Cuba is of many va- 
rieties, some of Avhich 
is always to be had 
the year around. The 
game is plentiful, such 
as deer, quail, guineas, 
pigeons, wild hogs, 
etc., and the fishing 
on the coast and in 




Mr. Miller and Mr. Meenen Examining the Bees. 



250 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




Of Course, They Wanted to See the Queen, and Mr. Miller is Gratifying their Wish 
in His " Reina" Apiary, Bartle, Cuba. 



some interior streams cannot be surpassed. There are to my knowl- 
edge no poisonous reptiles here — that is, fatally poisonous — and 
you seldom see any in the interior, and no more insect pests than 
in any of our undeveloped northern countries, and you are not 
bothered by mosquitoes, etc., if one has proper screens on his house. 
A very good little home can be built for $500. 

There are two seasons here, the rainy and dry. Northern sum- 
mer is our rainy season, and sometimes it rains every day, usually 
between 11 o'clock and 2. The ])alance of the day the sun shines. 
Winter is the dry season, and it does not, during this period, rain 
more as a rule than is needed for vegetation. Of course the seasons 
every year are not alike. 

There are 25,000 acres in the Bartle properties, of ver}^ fine 
land as a rule. Santiago, one of the principal cities of Cuba, is 130 
miles to the east, on the south coast, and Antilla about the same 
distance on the north coast, and there is train ser\'ice, both passen- 
ger and freight, to either place daily, and from both places excellent 
regular boat lines to all ports of the world. 

There are also many other good English colonies all over the 
island, a few of which are La Gloria, Heradura, Ocean Beach, Los 
Palacios, Santiago de las Vegas. Florida, Ytabo. Placetas, Riverside, 
Cieba Mocha, La Atalaya, Canet, Bayte, Aneaja and Paso Estancea. 

In nearly all of Cuba the water is very good, and it is as a 
whole comparatively healthy if one takes care of himself. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 251 

In the western part of Cuba, where the fine tobacco is grown, 
thev have been unfortunate in the way of wind storms which have 
at times done much damage; the eastern end, however, has escaped 
these, the geography of the country being a protection against such 
calamities. 

SCHEMES OF THE I.AND SHARPS. 

]\Iany land companies have circulated booklets and other liter- 
ature to help sell their land at falmlous prices to inexperienced peo- 
ple in the north, who in many cases know nothing about agriculture, 
even at home, and that kind of people don't belong here, but they 
make good easy picking for the land sharks, who care only for the 
cash they can get ; one's success here being of little concern to them. 
The writers of this misleading and false literattire are tisually those 
who have spent a very short time here, and their knowledge of Cuba 
is usually what some smooth individual has told them for the pur- 
pose best suited to himself. There is much poor land here as well 
as good, and it is hard sometimes to distinguish, so that a stranger 
should go very slow and be very careful, as I know- of no Canadian 
or English colonies where they would not take advantage, in order 
to sell land, of your lack of knowledge of conditions and values; 
probably not so much in the way of actually lying about what can 
be done, but in being very careful not to tell what cannot be done, 
and leaving a stranger in ignorance as to difficulties and objects to 
be overcome with only plenty of time and capital. 

Any English colony with an honest management and the right 
kind of settlers (who could and would do something) could be run 
so that there would be profit to all, provided each colony or several 
could be formed into a co-operative body that would pull together, 
but through the greediness and crookedness of the promoters or 
their pensioners many good places have been seriously handicapped, 
otherwise their population would have been increasing yearly more 
rapidly. 

SETTI.EMENTS ABE IMFBOVINCf. 

However, it is a pleasure today to see most of this class of the 
old heads of these settlements down and out. and tlie settlers re- 
maining are now going ahead and will, without doubt, come out all 
right. In the beginning most Americans were fruit crazy and could 
not think of anything else, consequently many have had to drop out 
and those who have now pulled through to success have -earned it. 
Today other crops are being grown so that something will be com- 
ing in to help along while the trees are developing. Many are tak- 
ing to bees, which are very profitable (and it has to be acknowledged 
that a grove of fruit trees, of any kind, will yield much more and:: 
better fruit if the pollen has been distributed l^y bees while gather- 



252 THE BEE-KEEPERo REVIEW 

ing the nectar from the blossom), others poultry, pigs, etc., but 
there is still a great open field in any of these projects. 
Bartle, Oriente, Cuba. 

fjust at present Cuba is having her troubles, and I am now wondering just 
how near Mr. Millar's gness will come regarding intervention by the United 
States. His letter wae written last April, which shows a pretty good knowledge 
of conditions there, judging by the latest developments. 

I am not personally acquainted with Mr. Miller, and having never been in 
Cuba I cannot personally vouch for the statements made, but the fact that both 
sides of the question are so frankly given in the above letter leads me to believe 
it is an honest statement of facts. It will be read with interest by all interested 
in that country.] 



The Value of Drones to the Swarm and Bee-Keeper. 

ARTHUR C. MILLER. 

^^^ HE drones, those much maligned members of the bee com- 

\Jj munity, are really among our best friends and helpers. We 

strive to prevent their occurrence, destroying them in every 

stage of growth, and we tolerate only a few as a necessary evil 

We should change our views and our practices. 

The drones are most interesting fellows once you come to know 
them. You would hardly think of looking for belligerency among 
them, and yet in their own way they are not lacking in spirit, in 
evidence of which note how they box and bite and how insistent 
they are that they be properly fed. As evidence of what some 
would call their brotherly or foster-paternal solicitude, notice when 
the cluster contracts during a cold storm how the drones pack 
closely over the surface of the outlying brood. Xo, oh no, not to 
keep it warm, but to keep themselves warm, which is also the cause 
of workers acting likewise, as can be readily demonstrated. 

How many of you are familiar with the peculiar odor of drones? 
A hundred years ago that odor was thought to be the principle 
which vitalized the eggs in the combs. 

Wiiile drones afford most interesting material for nature stu- 
dents, you practical bee-keepers onh^ want to know how they may 
be of value to you. Let us see. 

By the markings of the workers the purity or impurity of the 
stock is almost universally determined. The drones are even more 
essential to us in deciding on the purity of the queen. And just 
here I wish to ask you to distinguish between the purity of a queen 
and the purity of her oft'spring. \\'e speak of an Italian queen 
mated to an Italian drone as "pure," and of a queen from pure an- 
cestors mated to a drone of another race as "impure," but so 
applied the term is most misleading, for really the queen and her 
male offspring are pure while her female offspring are not. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 253 

To investigate by experiment we will raise a lot of queens 
from Italian stock such as is called pure, that is to say, one produc- 
ing" uniformly banded workers but variable drones. 2^1 ate some of 
these queens to drones from the same stock and some to blacks. If 
the experiment is on a suflficiently large scale the first lot will be 
found to contain some passing as purely mated, as judged by their 
worker offspring' and some as mismated, even though we are sure 
that no other drones were in reach. Of the so-called purely mated 
ones a few may be found to produce uniformly colored and marked 
drones and the others drones of varied marking. 

Of the queens mated to the black drones there will be found a 
similar conditions as to drones, but there will also be found this: 
the queens producing uniform drones will also be producing uniform 
though dark workers, while the queens producing the miscellaneous 
types of drones will also be producing a miscellaneous lot of workers. 

In the foregoing experiment absolute uniformity in any case 
can scarcely be expected, as the queen possessed variable potentials. 

In the Italian by Italian mating we cannot tell whether the 
drone in each case was from a queen producing uniform drones or 
not, and so we cannot be sure whether the queen we classed as im- 
purely mated was mated to an "irregular" drone, or she herself 
possessed the irregularity. Were it possible to treat queens as we 
do higher animals we could tell by the methods used with them. 
But with the Italian by black mating we know the drones were pure, 
so that all we have to consider is the relation of variation in the 
worker offspring to variation in the drone off"spring. It will be seen 
that where the drones were uniform in color and markings the 
workers were also uniform, but with queens producing non-uniform 
drones it is not so. \Miy is this so? Because the queen of sup- 
posedly pure stock carried impure blood, to use current language. 

To make the matter a little clearer, let us take a queen of a 
golden strain of known purity, a real thoroughbred, and mate her to 
a black drone also a thoroughbred. The resulting female offspring 
will be the most beautiful banded Italians one could ask to see, 
while the drones will be uniform Goldens. I know of but one or 
two bee men who would fail to pass that queen as a purely mated 
Italian of high quality. But we must go a step further. We must 
raise some queens from her, and we will mate them to golden 
drones of the parent stock, not her drones, lest someone sa}^ they 
were contaminated by her mating. Now what are the offspring? 
Some queens giving fairly uniform Golden workers, some giving 
banded Italians more or less uniform, and some giving a mixture. 
The queens of the first and second class will be found to produce 
drones of a fair degree of uniformity — not absolutely uniform, 



254 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

neither very irregular, while those of the third class range from 
Goldens to Blacks. 

If you have followed me you will see that uniformity of drone 
offspring indicates pure parentage of the queen, while lack of uni- 
formity of the drones means impure ancestry. Queens of pure 
ancestry will breed true to drones of their stock, while those of 
impure ancestry will rarely do so either to drones of their own 
stock or to drones of thoroughbred stock. 

And now you can understand why some seasons you have so 
many of what you call mismatings. Your queen stock is not 
thoroughbred. 

Providence. R. I. 



Getting the Bees to Clean Up Cappings. 

WM. KERNAN. 

OX page 310, of the 1909 Review, Mr. J. Crane gives a plan for 
getting the bees to clean up cappings, by putting the cappings 
in pails or kegs for the bees to work on. As this is apt to 
cause considerable annoyance in an apiary, the thought occurred to 
me, why not place the cappings in boxes in the colonies in upper 
stories? 

Last summer I oot several small drv goods boxes and tried this 
as an experiment, and it seems to be a good thing, probably better 
than netting or washing the cappings, and I don't know as it takes 
any more time or laJDor, and the honey is all saved. 

The boxes should be a little smaller than the inside of a hive 
body. A few nails may be driven part way in the bottom of the 
box to keep from killing" bees when lowering the box and also a 
cleat should be nailed across the top of the box, to carry it by. The 
boxes can be placed on colonies storing honey during the summer, 
but late in the fall it is probably not a good thing to disturb the 
colonies by slow feeding, as they are not apt to form m a cluster 
for wintering. 

FEEDERS AGAIN. 

Last spring I wanted to do a little stimulative feeding, and I 
was not quite satisfied with any of the feeders. I got a few cans 
and was making pepper-box breeders of them. Right beside me in 
a box was a lot of new SV^-lb. friction top honey cans. I tried a 
few of them and I found they w^ere fine. The way I used them was, 
1 took a piece of building paper the size of a hive and cut a small 
hole in the center and placed the inverted can over the small hole 
and the bees came up in the hollow in the can top. I found that 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 255 

just a few small holes in the can top was sufficient for slow, stim- 
ulative feeding. But for fast feeding for winter stores a larger fric- 
tion top can can be used or two of them on a colony, and quite a 
lot of small holes can be punched in the lid. The can may be raised 
a little higher by cutting a circle out of a piece of heavy pasteboard 
and placing it under the can. 

Early in the spring a colony can be kept very warm by putting 
leaves or chaff on top of the paper around the feeder, and the feed 
can be kept warm in this way by using a hive body on top. 
Dushore, Pa. 

[Please take note that the boxes of cappings are not placed on top of the hive, 
out in the open, where bees from all colonies can reach them. They are placed in 
an upper story, and are only accessible to the bees in the hive in which they are 
placed. 

At first I thought that there would be some danger from robbing by this 
plan, but if they are first put on in the evening I don't know but the danger would 
be small. Of course if it was done during a honey flow therewould be no danger 
at any time. You can easily try it out. anyway. In a private letter Mr. Kernan 
writes me that he has tried the plan two seasons and likes it very well.] 



Ridding Supers of Bees. 

L. R. DOCKERY. 

'^WX the July issue of the Review for 1909, [Mr. Elmer Hutchin- 
Jjl son, Mr. S. E. Miller and Mr. F. B. Cavanagh had much to 
say about ridding extracting supers of bees. Each one had a 
system different to the others. 

I suspect from the way they do things that all of them use a 
full depth hive body for a super. If so I should think Mr. Hutch- 
inson's is the most perfect system. However, Mr. Miller's is the 
most like our own. We use the ideal super 5J/s inches deep, which 
has many advantages over a full depth one. \\'e have no use for 
queen excluding honey boards and bee escapes. A\ ith this super 
only a few puff's of smoke are needed to drive most of the bees 
down and out before taking it off'. 

A trick we have learned, is to wait until the working force has 
gone to the field before beginning the operation of taking off the 
supers. In doing this we avoid the robbing nuisance. Then we 
begin first by taking off' the cover and blowing a few whiff's of 
smoke down between the frames. Then I turn to another, taking the 
cover off, giving them some smoke down between the frames, and 
then to another and another, until there are five or six with their 
covers off', and all having been smoked, most of the bees have gone 
down. I then return to the first one that I gave a smoke shock 
and give them another, and treat the others in a like manner, then 
aofain I return to the first, and if all the bees are not out I give 



256 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

them some more smoke. Then take off the super and stand on end, 
bu\t stand it in such a position that the sun does not strike the 
honey, as it would melt the combs before I am ready to carry the 
supers into the extracting house. I proceed in this way until we 
have off as many supers as we can extract during the day, and no 
more, as all that would be left over night would be troublesome to 
extract. 

Now before carrying the supers into the extracting house a 
fourth round is made with the smoker, giving all a little smoke. 
This rids them almost entirely of bees. Then they are immediately 
carried to the extracting house. During the course of extracting, 
if any brood should be found it is put in an empty super provided 
for the purpose, and at the end of the day, this super or supers is 
put back on some of the weaker colonies, or new colonies formed. 
However, while taking the supers off a close watch is kept on them 
and if at any time robbing should commence they are at once car- 
ried to the extracting house and stacked in a criss-cross sort of way 
in the lightest place possible, so that the few remaining bees will 
pass out. 

Goliad, Texas. 



A Discussion of Those Picture Grading Rules. 

(Continued from June) 

'^^S'X continuing the discussion of the grading rules, I can do no 
jl better than to now give you the latest rules adopted by the 
Colorado State Bee-Keepers' Association. They are as fol- 
lows: 

FANCY WHITE. 

"Sections to be well filled, comb firmly attached on all sides 
and evenly capped, except the outside row. next to the wood. 
Honey, comb and cappings white and not projecting beyond wood. 
Wood to be well cleaned ; no section in this grade to weigh less 
than 13J/2 ounces. 

No. 1. 

"Sections to be well filled, combs firmly attached on all four 
sides and evenly capped, except the outside row, next to the wood. 
Honey white or very light amber ; comb and cappings from white to 
slightly off color. Comb not projecting beyond the wood, wood to 
be well cleaned; no section in this grade to weigh less than IS^^ 
ounces. 

CHOicz:. 

"Sections to be well filled, combs firmly attached and not pro- 
jecting beyond the wood and entirely capped, except the outside 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 257 

row next to the wood. Honey, comb and cappings from white to 
amber, but not dark. Wood to be well cleaned; no section in this 
grade to weigh less than twelve ounces. 

No. 2. 

"This grade is composed of sections that are entirely capped, 
except row next to wood, weighing from ten to twelve ounces, also 
of such sections that weigh 12 ounces or more and have not more 
than 50 uncapped cells altogether, which must be filled. Comb and 
cappings from white to amber in color and not dark ; wood to be 
well cleaned. 

No second hand cases to be used for any of the above grades. 

ZIXTBACTED HONEV. 

"]\Iust be thoroughly ripened, weight 1'3 pounds per gallon. It 
must be well strained and packed in new cans. It is classed as 
white, light amber and amber. 

STRAINED HONEY. 

'Ts honey obtained from combs by all other means except the 
centrifugal extractors and is classed as white, light amber, amber 
and dark and must be thoroughly ripened and well strained. It 
may be put up in cans that previously have contained honey. 

GRADING INSTRUCTIONS. 

''The aim of establishing grading rules is to secure uniformity 
in the methods of packing and grading and thereby make it pos- 
sible to put on the market a product of such excellence that careful 
buyers will pay top prices for it. 

"A few brief directions are deemed necessary to the parties 
doing the actual work of preparing, grading and packing. 

"In removing filled supers the smoker must be kept well filled 
so no ashes will spot the cappings. Robber bees must be kept from 
them and when piling supers up in the honey house, one or several 
sheets of newspaper should be used between supers, to catch any 
possible drip and keep out dust and ants. 

"The shipping case adopted as the standard by the Colorado 
State Bee-Keepers' Association is the double tier case with glass 
front, holding S-t sections, 4^'" x 4>:j/' x l^/g" each. L'se slim cement 
coated flat-head nails one inch long for nailing cases, put the best 
looking side of grooved front strips to the outside and select the 
best and smoothest finished boards for covers. If bottoms or cover 
boards should project, they must be planed off. This is necessary 
for proper loading. A sheet of plain paper goes into the bottom of 
the case, forming a tray. On top of this belongs a sheet of corru- 
gated cardboard, corrugations up. On top of the lower tier of sec- 



258 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

tions goes another paper tray and cardboard. Generally a sheet of 
corrugated cardboard is also furnished to lay on the top tier of sec- 
tions. If this is not the case and plain paper is used, it must not 
be permitted to stick out of the case. 

The mark of the grade of honey must be put into both hand 
holes of each case, as follows : 

Fancy W'hite — Must be marked XX in hand holes. 

N^umber One — 'Must be marked X in hand holes. 

Choice— Must be marked — in hand holes. 

Number Two — Must be marked 11 in hand holes. 

"Sections must be well scraped. This means that all propolis 
(bee glue) and beeswax must be removed from the edges and out- 
sides of all sections of honey. Some use a short, very sharp butcher 
knife with broken off point. Others prefer a smaller knife with 
square edge, kept square by the frequent use of a file. Sections that 
are badly mildewed must be put into the cull honey. 

"The cleaning and grading of honey must be done in a well 
lighted place, but not in the direct rays of the sunlight. A well 
ventilated and screened room with one or several large north win- 
dows is the ideal. No grading should be done by artificial light, 
because neither artificial light nor strong sunlight will enable a per- 
son to grade comb honey properly, owing to its transparency. A 
large bench or table is needed to give plenty of room for the work 
and the placing of shipping cases to pack the various grades in. 
Except for the fancy white, it is necessary to hai'e several cases for 
each grade on the bench so that honey of the same shade and finish ivill 
he cased together. Even in the number two grade the packing of 
various shades of color in one case is bad work. 

"To avoid errors in casing, each grade should always have the 
same space on the bench, and cases should be marked with grade 
before covers are nailed on. 

"If possible one person only, with a good eye for color, should be 
entrusted with the work of grading the crop. The other work may 
be done by any number of persons. This plan secures uniformity 
of grading and places the responsibility for this most important 
work on one person. The grader should be provided with a copy 
of the grading rules and specimen sections, two or three of each, 
the poorest that are to go into each grade. Have these specimens 
properly marked and kept before the grader at all time, with instruc- 
tions not to put anything into a grade poorer than the specimens, and 
if in doubt about a section to put it into the next lower grade. 

"A sensitive spring scale, with large dial, plainly indicating )^ 
ounces, is needed for the weighing up of doubtful sections. A 
scale especially adapted for the work can be bought for $1.50. After 
using- the scale for a short time most graders will find that but a 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 259 

small part of the crop needs to be weighed, as they soon get very 
efficient in judging weights. 

^'Tlic front sections of honey in a case must be alike in color and 
finish and be a true representation of the contents. 

"Comb honey not permitted in shipping grades: 

Honey packed in second-hand cases. 

Honey in badly stained sections. 

Honey showing signs of granulation. 

Leaking, injured or patched up sections. 

Sections containing honey dew. 

Sections with more than 50 uncapped cells, or a less number of 
empty cells. 

Sections weighing less than the required weight. 

"Such honey may be sold around home or rendered. 

"Don't put off: case comb honey as soon as taken from the 
hives and market while weather is warm. The early market is usu- 
ally the best. 

"Don't haul without springs and don't allow cases to get soiled 
or dusty. 

"Don't ship comb honey, in less than carlots. unless packed in 
carrier crates, holding eight cases each, with straw in bottom. 

"Don't ship by express, except very short distances. Freight is 
cheaper and just as safe. 

"Notice — As practically all bee-keepers are now using separa- 
tors between each row of sections, no provision is made in the 
grading rules for half and non-separatored honey. 

TO EXTBACTi:]} HONEV FBOSUCEBS. 

''Do not get honey contaminated by excessive use of smv;>ke. 

"Be sure honey is thoroughly ripened and well strained before 
putting into cans. 

"Put (60') sixty pounds net in each five-gallon can. 

"Adopt the plan of marketing each extracting with a different 
number or letter, as there is usually a variation of color and flavor 
in the different extractings. If a good-sized sample is kept of each 
lot with the mark and number of cans in lot on it, it is easy to 
satisfy an intending purchaser as to quality and color. 

"Cases should be nailed with T-penny cement coated box nails, 
and for long distance local shipment the ends should be strapped 
with band iron or wire. 

"The grading of any article, honey not excluded, is a simple 
matter if the person doing the grading will follow the golden rule 
and put himself in the place of the buyer." 

(Continued in August Review.^ 



260 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL, Managing Editor. 

Office — ^230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Discontinuances — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. .-\t the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

Advertising rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



The thing that makes the trouble is not so much what actually 
happens, but what we fear may happen, and it is fear and imagina- 
tion that cause panics. — CJws. Austin Bates. 



The July installment of the article by G. B. Howe is omitted 
because, owing to a rush of work, ]\Ir. Howe did not get his manu- 
script to me in time. It will appear in the August number. 



The Honey Crop According to Present Indications. 

Letters that I am receiving indicate that many are getting a 
heavy crop of honey, but the trouble is that there are but a few 
bees to gather it. ^^'e see no reason as yet why the prices obtained 
last vear should not be realized this. 



Tin Shipping-Cases for Comb Honey. 

John S. Semens, of Tra\-erse, Colo., suggests the use of tin 
shipping cases for the shipment of comb honey, to be used in place 
of wooden ones. He suggests that the National get some tin ones 
made, of the right size to hold 2-i sections, double tier, with corru- 
gated paper between the tiers, besides a sheet at top and bottom. 
Then he thinks these cases could be returned to the producer for 
refilling. 

Artificial Lighting-Places for Swarms. 

Eugene E. Eraser, of Big Rapids, Alichigan, keeps his swarms 
at home on a city lot by providing a unique artificial lighting place. 
This is simply a small tree planted upside down. Dig up a small 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 261 

tree, maple preferred, and plant it with the roots in the air, about 
six or eight feet above ground. He finds that it makes an excellent 
lighting place for his swarms, one the bees readily select, and one 
from which the bees can be easily hiyed. 



Making Candy for Queen-Cages Without Using Honey. 
In talking with a queen breeder a short time ago about the new 
postal ruling, in which one must either have an inspector's certili- 
cate of inspection, or make afifidavit before a notary that the honey 
used in mailing cages was boiled, before one could mail queens, he 
said that he believed the time near when honey would not be used 
at all for that purpose. He explained by saying that he was using 
a candy made of sugar. The syrup is made of granulated sugar, 
and then powdered sugar is added to make the dough. To prevent 
crystalizing he adds a little glycerine. 



The Hardest Fight You Have for Success is With Yourself. 

In telling of a long, hard struggle for success the other day, 
the teller said the hardest struggle he had was with himself. And 
what was true of him is no doubt true of all of us. Many times 
we are on the point of giving up. Everything seems to go against 
us. Help which we expected fails to materialize. All forces seem 
to be united to crush us to defeat. But through it all the biggest 
enemy is our own feelings. How easy it is to give up. to take the 
easier course, to say "It's no use.'' Then is when w^e need to give 
ourselves a good threshing. If we can conquer ourselves, we can 
conquer all the other obstacles. 



Using Second-Hand Cans for Honey. 

Last winter I had occasion to buy a few cans of extracted 
honey, from a prominent bee-keeper who I knew produced a good 
article. This man had stated to me some time before, which I had 
forgotten at the time, that he used second-hand cans, and never had 
any complaints, and could see no reason for using new ones so long 
as the others gave satisfaction, and cost so much less. 

It happened that this honey was candied, and with a heavy 
knife and hammer I proceeded to remove the tin from the honey. 
When the tin was removed I had a beautiful brown-coated pile of 
white extracted honey before me. I wish that bee-man could have 
been present and seen it. He could have sold it for "russet honey," 
from its color. All because the "just-as-good-as-new second hand 
can" had been rusty. 



262 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Xow I didn't complain to that man, consequently he can still 
say he has had no complaint, but I will remember that I can't bank 
on his honey being first-class. I wonder if those cans haven't lost 
him other sales. 

Those Comb Honey Grading Rules. 

Elsewhere in this issue is continued the discussion regarding 
grading rules. When it is all finished it will at least prove one 
thing, and that is that we need something uniform, and a uniform 
interpretation of them. Some think we can not secure uniform 
rules, but I would like to know why. Is a comb of honey any dif- 
ferent because it is produced in California instead of Maine? I be- 
lieve we can get uniform rules, when we are willing to get together 
and not want a little set of rules for our personal benefit. 

Here is what I would propose: Have the directors of the Na- 
tional Bee-Keepers' Association select a committee of three experi- 
enced comb honey producers, familiar with grading. Have the 
honey buyers also furnish a committee of three. Have this com- 
mittee of six meet at the next National convention,^ and draw up a 
set of uniform grading rules, and then all v/ork to standardize those 
rules. 

Binding the "Review" With Nails. 

In a private letter from Mr. \\\ H. Eveleth, Salix, Iowa, he 
tells me of a neat and inexpensive way to bind your Reviews. 

Take one year's numbers of the Review, pile them up in order, 
and then select some nails of just the right length to reach nearly 
through the pile of Reviews, but not quite. Remember, the nails 
must not reach clear through. 

Now take some common cloth or binding tape and fold it up sc^ 
it is just about ^ inches wide. Use this to drive the nails through 
so the heads won't pull through the outside covers. By using a lit- 
tle care you can drive four or five nails that will reach nearly 
through the whole set from each side, near the back edge, (about 
9^-inch from the edge ) and you have a strong, serviceable volume, 
and the best of it is that when you want to refer to a particular 
copy that number isn't missing and can't be found, which is often 
the case when loose copies are piled away on shelves, etc. 



Is the Isle of Wight Disease in America? 

The old saying that there is nothing new under the sun seems 
to be continually verified. Just as we begin to believe we have dis- 
covered a new disease, we find that it is an old one under a new 
name. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 263 

The English Board of Agriculture has issued a report on the 
Isle of Wight disease, during C\Iay. and a copy has just reached 
me. In reading a report of the S}'mptoms, written by G. \\'. Bulla- 
more and W. Maiden. ]\L D.. I found that they considered the Isle 
of Wight disease and Paralysis the same. They report different 
kinds of paralysis, and even bring in spring dwindling as one form. 

If this is so, we have had the Isle of Wight disease here for 
years. Only a short time ago I was talking with one man who win- 
tered 100 per cent, of his colonies, and then lost 40 per cent by 
spring dwindling, this spring. It may be that paralysis is a niore 
deadly disease than we have thought it to be. 

It will be interesting to know more of these investigations, and 
whether the above supposition will be verified. The book men- 
tioned contains 144 pages and cover, and can be had for one shilling, 
English money, by addressing Board of Agriculture. 4 Whitehall 
Place, London, S. W. 



Crop Report Blanks. 

In this issue, on page 279, you will find a crop report blank. 
Cut it out, fill it out carefully with pen and ink, and then return 
it to me. 

When these blanks are returned, the information they contain 
will be carefully tabulated, and from them we should get a pretty 
good knowledge of crop conditions. This information will also be 
supplemented by a review of market conditions, and the whole con- 
densed into a crop report that will be invaluable to each member. 
This will then be sent to each member, probably in a circular, and 
will give you valuable information regarding the sale of your honey. 

But I must warn you to report the facts as they are, and not 
to add to or take from the actual figures. It is only by actual 
figures that true conditions can be ascertained. And don't delude 
yourself into thinking that if you withhold your report buyers 
will not know conditions, for they have been working all summer 
to get statistics, and you are the one v/ho needs the posting. A 
knowledge of true conditions will not hurt any one. 

Another thing — each National branch can get out a booklet, 
such as the '^Michigan Association gets out. if they desire. I will be 
pleased to furnish the Secretary with the proper information from 
these reports to enable the booklet to be gotten out, without going 
to the expense of sending out other report blanks. One branch has 
already signified its intention to get out a booklet this fall. Michi- 
gan members will please remember that this report will be used for 
their booklet, and not fail to fill out and return the blank. 



264 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

SHjF Natinnal Ir^-K^^p^ra' AsHnrtatinn 

Anb Us IJrattrliPH 

Officers. Directors. 

George W. York, President. ... Sandpoint, Ida. E. D. Townsend, Chairman Remus, Mich. 

MoRLEY Pettit, Yice-Pres. . . Guelph, Ont., Can. J. ^I. Buch.\nan Franklin, Tenn. 

E. B. Tyrrell, Secretary Detroit, Mich. Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. 

230 Woodland Ave. J. E. Crane Middlebury, Vt. 

N. E. France, Treas. Gen. Mgr., Plattville, Wis. F. Wilcox Mauston, Wis. 

Ilfational Branches and Their Secretaries. 

Adirondack — H. E. Gray.. Fort Edwards, N.Y. New Jersey— E. G. Carr....New Egypt, N. J. 

Colorado — Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. N. Michigan — Ira D. Bartlett 

Chicago-Northwestern— L. C. Dadant V ' "^ • %• -A^^®' Jordan, Mich. 

Hamilton, 111. Ohio — Prof. N. E. Shaw, Dept. of Agr 

Idaho— R.' D.' BradshawV.'.'.V. '.'.'. . .Notus, 'ida'. ^ • • • • • " ■ii\- ' :/ ' '^^ -Columbus Ohio 

1 T AC. Ti.. . a ■ c ^A ^^^ Ontario — P. W. Hodgetts, Parliament Bldg., 

Illinois — Jas. A. Stone. . .Rt. 4, Springfield, 111. = Toronto, Ont., Can. 

lowA — C. L. Pinney Le Mars, Iowa Oregon — H. Wilson Corvallis, Ore. 

Indiana — Walter Pouder, 859 Mass. Ave... Pecos Valley — Henry C. Barron 

Indianapolis, Ind. Hagerman, New Mexico 

Missouri — J. F. Diemer Liberty, Mo. Twin Falls — C. H. Stimson. .Twin Falls, Ida. 

Michigan— E. B. Tyrrell, 230 Woodland Tennessee— J. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn. 

." Ave., Detroit, Mich. N'ermont — P. E. Crane Middlebury, Vt. 

Minnesota — C. E. Palmer, 1034 Miss. St.. Washington — J. B. Ramage 

St. Paul, Minn. Rt. 2, N. Yakima, Wash. 

Wisconsin — Gus Dittmer Augusta, Wis. 



Send in Your Proposed Changes to the Constitution. 

In the next issue Chairman Townsend will have something to 
say regarding some proposed changes in the constitution, and as 
these proposed changes must be placed before the Branch Secre- 
taries at least ninety days before the meeting of Delegates, each of 
you should lose no time in sending them in. Personally I believe 
that they should all be published in the Review, but question the 
advisability of taking up their discussion before the Delegates meet. 
I refer, of course, to their discussion through the pages of the jour- 
nals. My reasons are that lack of space would not permit a fair 
discussion of them. It would be a splendid thing, however, for 
them to be taken up at the different branch meetings, and thor- 
oughly discussed there. Send in your proposed changes. 



Legal Help for National Members. 

The impression seems to have gone out that under the new 
constitution the National Association can not gi\e its members 
legal help. I don't understand it that way. 

]\Iy understanding is simply this. The Association does not 
specifically promise legal help to members. This I would consider 
wise, as it does not attract those to membership who might take 
advantage of that feature. ^Ir. France, if I remember correctly, 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 265 

stated that when the Association paid all the legal costs of suits, 
there were a good many more than when the rule was adopted 
to only pay half. So if no promises were held out to help in law- 
suits, the members would be more cautious than ever as to how they 
started lawsuits. 

But this does not mean that the directors could not help any 
deserving member in legal matters. In fact I have had a request 
recently from a member who kept bees in town, stating neighbors 
tried to get the Council to pass an ordinance to prohibit the keeping 
of bees in the city. I wrote the Council, through the City Clerk, 
and gave them previous decisions. I have heard nothing further so 
presume the ordinance did not pass. I also have another request 
along the same lines, and will give it my attention. 

Another member wrote me that he had sent some money to an 
advertiser some time ago, and complained because he had been in- 
formed that the National would not help him get his money or 
queens. I replied stating that I was glad he had written me, that 
we were glad to take up such cases, and also wrote the advertiser. 
A later letter from the member showed that he had secured satis- 
faction, and he naturally wondered why he had been told. the Na- 
tional would not help. 

I am writing this without taking it up with the directors, and 
they may hold a different view from the abo\e, but I believe I am 
voicing the sentiments of every director when I say that the Na- 
tional will always help a member in every reasonable way, so far 
as it is in its power to do so. 



Summer Meeting of the New Jersey Branch. 
Secretary E. G. Carr wishes me to announce that they will hold 
their summer meeting on Friday, July 12th. at the apiarv of member 
C. H. Root, of Red Bank, N. J. All bee-keepers welcome. 



Fighting Foul Brood With a Railroad Train. 

"All aboard for the Institute Special." and we climbed on, at 
Bay City, ^lichigan, Friday, the 14th, for a trip through Northern 
^Michigan. 

Here is how it happened. Our State was out a Foul Brood 
Inspector for this year. The one we had last year had secured 
another position. The State Dairy and Food Inspector understood 
that he had to have a recommendation from the Michigan Associ- 
ation in order to place a new man in charge. So I went to Lansing. 

When I got there I found that the Agricultural College was in- 
tending to send a train through Northern ^^lichigan with exhibits 



266 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

and speakers. 1 had always wondered why l:)ees were not repre- 
sented on those trips, or at Farmers' Institutes. After a certain 
amount of digging I was introduced to Prof. L. R. Taft, who has 
charge of Farmers" Institute work, and who was arranging and had 
charge of the Institute Special, and he kindly agreed to include me 
as one of the speakers. The object was to try out a plan I had, 
and see just how much interest there was in bee-keeping. 

So that is why I was on the train. And I am more than pleased 
with the result. The trip is not yet finished, and I will probably 
write more about it for the August number, but I want to tell you 
a few things I discovered. 

First, I discovered that we as bee-keepers have a lot of help 
lying around waiting for us to ask for it. For instance, I found 
that if I would prepare the copy, that the State \vould print for me 
a lot of placards, calling the people's attention to the disease known 
as foul brood, and telling about the law^ governing it. But they 
could not distribute them for us. 

So I took a lot of them with me on the trip, and left a dozen 
at each stop with some one who would see that tiiey were posted 
around the place. Then while riding from one place to another I 
happened to overhear the Industrial Superintendent of the railroad 
we w^ere riding on. and who was with us while we were on his road, 
talking to an Institute man about how they (the railroads) could 
distribute placards for the college if they w^ould only get them out. 
Instantly I was all attention, and I got up close and began asking 
questions. I showed him one of ours, and after reading it he said 
if I would furnish him with enough to send all their agents located 
on their main lines, he would see that they were distributed free. 

Now, if the Michigan Central would do this, what would hinder 
the other lines from doing the same? They reasoned that anything 
that would help the farmer along production lines would, of course, 
help the transportation companies; hence it would be to their ad- 
vantage to co-operate. 

So I am going after every Railroad Company doing business in 
Michigan. If I succeed I will soon have warnings regarding foul 
brood posted in every railroad town in Michigan, at no expense to 
the bee-keepers. Now if I can do that m Michigan it can also be 
done in every state in the union, and with this information before 
them it should do much to stop the spread of disease. I will be 
glad to mail a copy of the placard to officers of local or state bee- 
keepers' associations, or to foul brood inspectors, if they wish one. 

But about my talk on that institute train. I told of the annual 
production of honey in Michigan, then explained that the honey 
was only a part of the product of the honey bee, for we must credit 
a large part of the fruit crop to it for its work of carrying the 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 267 

pollen from tiower to flower. Then I told them I was on the train 
because there was an enemy to the bee in ^lichigan. that it had 
been reported in 3.5 of the (iS counties in lower Michigan, and ended 
up by showing them a sample of the disease. I had good attention 
all along the line. 

If you would like to tr}- this plan in your State vvrite me for 
further particulars. 



Local and State Officers Acting as Branch Officers, 

A letter received since the June issue of the Review, reminds 
me that I did not make it clear in that issue, that where local ofB- 
cers agree to act as branch officers, they in no way abridge the 
powers or liberties of their associations. 

By reading the resolutions carefully, you will notice that the 
plan is to have these officers act as branch officers until their next 
meeting. This is done because in many instances the local associa- 
tions did not have an opportunity to act on becoming a National 
Branch at their last meeting, or did not have time to give the matter 
careful consideration. According to the action of the directors at 
their January meeting, each member to the National w^as to be a 
member of a local branch. The object of this is apparent to all. for 
if they could join direct many would do so and neglect their local 
association. In order to carry out the provisions of the constitu- 
tion, and build the National of branches instead of individual mem- 
bers, it is necessary to protect these branches. 

But a complication arose where members would send in their 
$1.50 from a state that did not have a branch. ]\Iany times the 
member did not know that his association did not belong, and re- 
quested membership in it. The $1.00 was all the National was to 
have, and there would be 50c to turn over to some branch. Either 
we had to place that member in a branch outside his state, or organ- 
ize a branch in his state, unless we could get the state officers to act 
as branch officers until the next meeting of that association. 

It appears that the statement that a branch would be organized 
in a state where the local association refused to become a National 
branch, has been taken as a threat. That was not the intention, 
and I am sorry if it was so considered. I was trying to place the 
matter before you in a way so you could see the conditions con- 
fronting us. '^Members of the National naturally like to belong to 
a branch where they can attend the meetings. If that branch is 
out of their state it is hard for them to do so. 

I might add that some of the branches named in the Review 
have not taken formal action as vet, but thev are being considered 



268 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

as branches as their officers have consented to act as branch officers 
until their association has a chance to consider the matter at its 
next meetino'. 



Director Wesley Foster Gives Some Excellent Reasons for the 
Purchase of The Review. 

Fclloiv Bcc-Kccf'crs — The National Bee-Keepers' Association is 
in business for the bee-keepers. It is your organization, and you 
have the opportunity to receive the advantages. Btit you have not 
the right to ask "What benefit is the National to me,'' only. You 
must also ask yourself: "\Miat benefit can I be to the National?" 
The National Association is partly an attempt and partly a realiza- 
tion. I can find bee-men over the whole country who have said 
that the National was no good to them, and it was partly because 
they were no good to the National. If you are not willing to take 
the benefits of the National partly on faith, you are not at heart a 
co-operator and the logical thing for you to do is to withdraw from 
all associations. 

But if you will sit down and figure prices on <:ans and freight 
rates and take up with Mr. Tyrrell the problem of selling your 
honey, it will not be long before you will begin to realize the ben- 
efits. Then there is national and state legislation on bee culture 
that the National is working on. Yoti should belong, if for no other 
reason than that you want to help. 

The Review is now yours, and we want you to make every pos- 
sible use of it. Get new subscriber-members, advertise your bees, 
queens, etc., for sale in the classified cohunns and induce your neig^h- 
bors to patronize the Review. 

If during the coming year you are not able to get ideas from 
the Review worth five times what the membership amounts to, it 
will be because you "know it all" or are incapable of applying new 
knowledge. But there are very few of the latter kinds of bee-men, 
and we know that the National and the Re\iew are just coming into 
their own. I am glad that I have had a little to do with bringing 
about the coalition. 

As one of the directors, I have favored an official organ, such 
as we now have in the Review, from the first. There is one reason 
that is uppermost in my mind now, why we need such an organ. 
Heretofore, we have had no mouthpiece of our own, through which 
we could say the things to each other that should be said. The 
privately owned journals could hardly be expected to fight some of 
the more disagreeable battles for us and then stand the chances of 
financial loss by losing patronage. If the National gets into a strug- 
gle with some common enemy of bee-keepers it should have a 
mouthpiece through which the membership can be apprised of the 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



269 



situation. Tlie Xational at the present time does not contemplate 
any dangerous encounters, and hopes to employ its efforts in build- 
ing instead of fighting. 

For every dollar you pay for a bee journal, the advertiser planks 
down an additional dollar, which you finally pay ; for the ad\-ertiser 
gets the dollar out of you when you buy his goods. So e\'ery dollar 
bee paper or other journal costs you two dollars, probably more, 
for the advertiser would not continue to advertise if he did not get 
more than his money back. You can enhance the assets of the 
Association very materially by patronizing the Rfa'ievv advertisers, 
advertising yourself and getting all the members you can. The 
Review is expected to be an effective membership builder and to 
return a profit to the Association, furnishing a fund to go after 
larger game. At the present time we are not expecting large re- 
turns except in the way of enlarging the membership. 

The Reniew will be published for the members. Advertisers 
will be admitted to grace the advertising pages so long as they 
have a golden rule proposition to present to the members. You 
cannot help the Association more than by writing at once of any 
dishonesty on the part of any advertiser. 

The Review will deal with the science, practice and progress of 
bee-keeping. As much thought will be crammed into each page as 
the paper will hold. The National Association will work through 
the Review for Xational grading rules, and the business side of 
honey marketing. A\'e will not forget the enthusiastic amateur or 
the nature loving bee student. And with it all we will work for 
the building up of the co-operative spirit among bee-men. This is 
the most hopeful thought of the times. \\'e are beginning to realize 
that the people can manage their own aff'airs if they get started 
right, and are not too impatient of results. 

Weslev Foster. 



Rear Your Own Queens. 

Send vour address and learn HOW TO 
COMBINE THE BEST FEATURES OF ALL 
SYSTEMS, or send 50 cents for EUREKA 
LARVA TRANSPLANTER and full direc- 
tions. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

MARK VV. MOE, 
1714 Exposition Ave., Denver, Colo. 

WANTED 

FANCT WHITE COMB AND IJX- 
TBACTES HONEY 

Please write to us at once if you have any 
to spare, stating how much and price you 
expect to get. 

THE PIERCE BROS. CO., 

551 Woodward Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 



CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 

in 

Honey, Beeswax, Maple Sugar and 

Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 

THE 

SWARTHMORE APIARIES 

The late E. L. Pratt's Celebrated Gentle 

GOLDEN ALL OVER QUEENS 

PEDIGREED 

PENN G. SNYDER, State Apiary Inspector 
SWARTHMORE, PA. 



270 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 



FANCY 



NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



BOSTON. — Last season's crop of honey is 
all closed out and fancy new white comb we 
expect to sell here at 20 cents per lb., and we 
want the first that can be obtained for our best 
trade. Communications in regard to honey is 
solicited. White extracted, 10 to lie per lb.; 
w-a.\, 30c. 

June 25. BL.\KE-LEE CO. 



KANSAS CITY, MO.— Our market is en- 
tirely bare of comb honey. We think now No. 
1 white comb honey would sell for $3.50 or 
$3.75 per case of 24 sections. We are selling 
old extracted white at 8c and 9c per lb. Bees- 
wax 2oc to 2Sc per lb. 

June 24. C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 



TOLEDO— At this writing there is little do- 
ing in honey. Comb is about cleaned up, white 
selling at 16 to 17c per lb.; very little to offer 
at any price. Extracted white clover sells in 
small way at 10c, light amber Sc. Beeswax is 
quiet with stock coming in freely and sells at 
from 30 to 32c. 
May 20. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 



CINCINNATI— Market on comb honey is 
about cleaned up and practically no demand. 
Extracted honey has fallen off considerably, 
fancy white table honey in 60-pound cans at 
10 cents, light amber in 60-pound cans at 8 
cents. Amber in barrels Gyi cents and 7 cents 
according to quality. Beeswax fair demand at 
$33.00 per hundred. Above are selling prices, 
not what we are paying. 
May 20. C. H. W. WEBER CO. 



CHICAGO — The trade in honey during 
the past week has been of a very limited char- 
acter. A No. 1 to fancy comb is unobtainable 
and very little that will pass as No. 1 appears 
on sale. The prices for that are ranging from 
15 to 16c. Extracted has not been selling in 
quantity lots and the prices for it range nom- 
inally the same as for some time past, being 
from 8c to 9c for the white, and 7 to 8c for 



the various kinds of amber. Beeswax has been 
in fair supply and brings from 30 to 32c per 
lb. according to color and cleanliness. 

Yours truly. 
May 20. R. A. BURNETT & CO. 



DENYER, COL.— Old crop comb honey all 
sold. We expect ths first or the new crop by 
the middle of Jvily if weather conditions are 
favorable. We have a good stock of very fine 
extracted honey which we are quoting in a 
jobbing way at 9c for strictly white, 8c for 
light amber, 644 to lyic for strained. We 
pay 20c in cash and 28c in trade per lb. for 
clean yellow beeswax delivered at Denver. 
Yours very truly, 
THE COLORADO HONEY 
PRODUCERS' ASSN. 
June 25. F. Rauchfuss, Manager. 



CINCINNATI.— There is very little demand 
for honey at the present time; nevertheless, for 
the fancy comb honey we have we are getting 
$3.75 a case from the wholesaler, and $4.00 
from the retailer. Light amber honey in large 
quantities we are selling at Gyi to 7J^c per lb. 
and fancy table at from 8"^c to 10c, according 
to the quantity and quality purchased. Owing 
to the great loss of bees, no doubt there will 
be a fall in the price of beeswax, and only for 
the choicest wax can we pay 28c to 29c per 
pound delivered here. 

THE FRED W. MVTK CO. 

"The Busy Bee Men." 

Tune 19. '51 Walnut St. 



NEW YORK. — Nothing new in comb honey; 
small shipments of new crop are coming in 
from the South and are selling at from 13c to 
16c according to quality. E.xtracted honey. — 
Arrivals of new crop from the South are now 
coming in quite freely, as well as from the 
West Indies. Prices are rather unsettled as 
yet, ranging all the way from 70c to 90c per 
gallon, according to quality. Reports from 
California are rather conflicting, some of them 
estimating this year's crop at 500 cars, while 
others claim a very short crop. No offerings 
have been made as yet that we know of, and 
no prices established. Beeswax steady at from 
30c to 31c. 

June 24. HILDRETH & SEGELKEN. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



271 



O 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 



=o 



BEES ANI} QUEENS. 



Golden Italian Queens, Nuclei, and full 
colonies. See price-list in May Review, page 
197. Is.\AC F. TiLLiNGHAST, Factoryville, Pa. 

A Limited Number of Leather Colored Ital- 
ian Queens for Sale. Warranted purely mated, 
$1.50. Geo. B. Howe, Black River, N. Y. 



Colonies of Italian Bees in L. hives, 10- 
fr., full of stores — any time. Jos. Wallrath, 
Antioch, Cal. 

For Sale. — Bees, queens and supplies. Pure- 
blooded poultry and eggs, way below standard 
prices. A. M. Applegate, Reynoldsville, Pa. 

Nutmeg Italian Queens, after June 1, $1.00. 
Circular. A. W. Yates, 3 Chapman St., Hart- 
ford, Ct. 

Front Line Italian Queens, well bred and 
hardy. After June 1st, 6 for $4.50. Satis- 
faction guaranteed. T. B. Hollopeter, Pentz, 
Pa. 

Italian Queens. — Three band strain only. 
Tested $1.00 each; Untested $0.75; $7.00 per 
dozen. No disease. Send for price list. 

J. W. K. Shaw & Co., Loreauville, La. 

Queens and Nuclei. — A strain of Italians 
developed for honey-gathering ability. My en- 
tire time has been given to them for 12 years. 
W. D. AcHORD, Fitzpatrick, Bullock Co., Ala. 

Choice Italian Queens, delivery beginning 
April 15. Untested, 75 cts. ; tested, $1.00. Ten 
years' experience in queen-rearing. Send your 
orders now. F. Hughes, Gillett, Ark. 

Golden Italian Queens — L'ntested. war- 
ranted $1.00 each; si.x for $4.50; twelve for 
$8.00. Good reports where tried for Black 
brood. J. B. Case, Orange, Fla. 

Northern Bred Hardy Queens of Moore's 
strain of Italians ready the last of June; un- 
tested, $1.00 each; 5 for $6.00; 12 for $9.00. 
Orders filed and filled in turn. P. B. Ramer, 
Harmony, Minn. 

\'ermont Queens and Bees — Three-banded 
Italian-Howe strain crossed with best honey 
gatherers I ever owned. $1.00, untested; 6 for 
$5.00; nuclei, $1.00 per frame. Add price of 
queen. H. William Scott, Barre, Vermont. 

Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 



Queens. — Mott's strain of Italians and Car- 
niolans. Bees by pound, nuclei. 1 en-page list 
free. Plans for Introducing Queens, 15 cts.; 
How to Increase, 15 cts.; both, 25 cts. E. E. 
Mott, Glenwood. Mich. 



Italian and C.arnolan Queens — Nucleus and 
full colonies; bees by the pound; apiaries in- 
spected for brood diseases; bee supplies; write 
for circular. Frank M. Keith, S3J/2 Florence 
St., Worcester, Mass. 



Our Golden Queens produce beautiful 
golden bees, that are great honey gatherers and 
very gentle, and our leather colored will please 
you. (Government inspection). C. W. 
Phelps & Sox, 3 Wilcox St., Binghampton, 
N. Y. 

For Sale. — Moore's strain and golden Italian 
queens, untested, $1.00; six, $5.00; twelve, $9.00. 
Carniolan, Banat, and Caucasian queens, select, 
$1.25; six, $6.00; twelve, $10.00. Tested, any 
kind, $1.50; six, $8.00. Choice breeders, $3.00. 
Circular free. W. H. Rails, Orange, Cal. 

Carniolan Queens. — Bred from best im- 
ported stock. Many colonies can be manip- 
ulated without the use of smoke or veil. L'n- 
tested, one for $.75, six for $4.50, twelve for 
$8.00. Tested, one for $1.00, six for $5.00, 
twelve for $10.00. William Kermax, Dushore, 
Pa., R. D. 2. 

Bees and Queens — Italian Queens at 75c, 
$8.00 a dozen; tested $1.00, $10.00 a dozen; 
Cyprians, Carniolians, Caucasians or Banats at 
si. 00, tested $1.25; 2-5 gal. cans, 58c; 1 lb. 
bottles, $3.75 per gross; bees, supplies and 
honey. Walter C. Morris, 74 Cortlandt St., 
New York City. 

Golden Queens. — N'erj- gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, golden 
to tip queens, that should produce golden to tip 
workers, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also nuclei 
and full colonies. Send for circular and price 
list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St.. Phila- 
delphia, Penna. 

If you wish the best of untested three- 
banded Italian queens send us your orders — 
75 cents each, $8.00 per dozen. Safe arrival 
and satisfaction. No order too small nor too 
large to receive our prompt attention. The 
Golden Rule Bee Co., Rt. 1, Box 103, River- 
side, Cal. 

Golden and 3-Banded Italians. — lested, $1 
each. 3 queens $2.75; 6 or more, 85c each. 
L'ntested, 75c each; 3 queens, $2; 6 or more, 
65c each. Bees per pound, $1. Nuclei, per 
frame, $1.25. (No disease here.) C. B. 
Bankston, Buffalo, Texas. 

Quirin's famous improved Italian queens, 
nuclei, colonies, and bees by the pound, ready 
in May. Our stock is northern-bred and 
hardy; five yards wintered on summer stands 
in 1908 and 1909 without a single loss. For 
prices, send for circular. Quirin-the-Queen- 
Breeder, Bellevue, O. 

For Sale. — North Carolina-bred Italian 
queens, bred for business: none better for 
honey-gathering; good recommendations com- 
ing in almost every day. I have Root's and 
Moore's strain, Davis', Quirin's, Laws', and 



272 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 



choice imported breeders, to get my fine honey- 
gathering strain from. I breed all queens in 
full two-story colonies running over with bees 
at all times. I do not keep anything but the 
red-clover and the goldens in my yards. Try 
them and see for yourself. Untested, 75 cts. ; 
doz., $7.00; tested, $1.25; select tested, $1.50; 
extra select tested. $2.00; select breeders, $3; 
extra select, $5. H. B. Murr.w, Liberty, N.C. 

HONEY AND WAX. 

I \v.\NT comb honey, white or light amber, 
at once. O. X. B.^ldwin, Baxter Springs, 
Kansas. 

Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. Hildreth & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

MISCEI^IiANEOVS. 

Frame Manipulation made easy with "The 
Dandy" hive-tool; 20 cents postpaid. H. 
Benke, Pleasantville Station, N. Y. 

Rubber Stamps made to order. Breeder of 
Leghorns, W. Wyandotts. Jeff ^L-icOMBER, 
Gaylord, Mich. 

Wanted — Second-hand honey extractor. Must 
be cheap. Bee-Keeper, 1831 Fremont Ave., 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton^ Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 

Aluminum Hive Numbers (IJ^-in. high) 2c 
each. Fig. 50. or more l^c. Postpaid, incl. 
brass nails. Henry Benke, Pleasantville Sta., 
N. Y. 

For Sale. — Second hand 8-frame hives, sec- 
tions, shipping cases, GO-lb. cans, brood combs, 
foundation and wax, cheap. O. N. Baldwin, 
Baxter Springs, Kansas. 

Wanted — Every bee-keeper to try a Boyum 
foundation fastener. See adv. on page I6t! 
May issue or send for circulars. Address, The 
Boyum Apiaries Co., Rushford, Minn., U. S. A. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 

For Sale. — New 60-lb. cans, two in a case, 
lots of 10 cases, 60c each; 25 cases, 59c each. 
50 cases 58c each, 100 cases 57c each, F. 
O. B. factory in O. or 111. Quotations fur- 
nished on anything in cans; give quantity 
wanted. Large contracts enable us to make 
low prices. A. G. Woodman Co., Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 

Selling Out. — Danzenbaker hives and su- 
pers, new and second hand; also bees in either 
dovetailed or Danzenbaker hives. 8-frame 
dovetailed hives, including Italian queen and 
bees $4.00 each. 10-frame Danzenbaker or 
dovetailed hives, including Italian queen and 
bees, $5.00 each. Reason, other large interests 
consume my time. R. B. Chipman, Clifton 
Heights, Del. Co., Pa. 



B.J1AI, ESTATE. 



For Rent. — 160-acre ranch with 35 stands of 
bees. 25 head of horses, and 10 milk cows. 
All fenced, good water and near school. James 
J. Cook, Real Estate, Whiterocks, Utah. 



POVI.TKY'. 



Sicilian Buttercups — Eggs for hatching; 
circular free. D. S. Durall, Hurdland, Mo. 

Pigeons! Pigeons!— Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
our specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Prize-winning S. C. R. I. Reds, thorough- 
bred White Orpington, Barred Plymouth Rocks, 
Indian Runner ducks, fawn and white; white 
egg strain; eggs. Day old ducks. David M. 
Hammond, Woodside Poultry Yards, Rt. 5, 
Cortland, N. Y. 

Real Bargains — In stock 2-lb. pullets, chicks, 
eggs; heavy laying barred rocks, S. C. R. I. 
Reds, S. C. White Leghorns, Pekin Ducks; the 
kind we all want; don't go on a strike all 
w-inter; catalog free. Crystal Spring Farm, 
Rt. 2, Lititz, Pa. 

Eggs — From Houdans, Buff P. Rocks, White 
Wyandottes, Buff and Black Orpingtons, Buff 
Leghorns, R. C. B. Leghorns, R. I. Reds; eggs 
$1.50 per 15, $2.75 per 30, $4.00 per 45; 
Bronze Turkeys' eggs, $2.50 per 11, $4.50 per 
22. Address A. F. Firestone, Broadwell, 
Ohio, Athens Co. 



Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

Bright, Powerful, Economical. . 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in your home. If your 
dealer hasn't got them, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
many as you want at 25c each. 
AGENTS WANTED EVERY- 

THE STEEL MANTLE LIGHT CO. 

aSi Huron St.. Toledo, O. 




BEE-KEEPERS 

Look up your .stock at once and send 
me a list of the supplies you need. I 
have a large stock to draw^ from to 
handle your orders for Hives, Sections, 
Comb Foundation, etc.; standard goods 
with latest improvements fresh from 
the factory at factory schedule of 
prices. I have a general line of Root's 
Goods constantly on hand. My facili- 
tie-: for serving you are unequalled. 

Beeswax taken in exchange for sup- 
plies or cash. 

Italian Bees and Queens 
Be sure you have my 1912 Catalog of 

Bees. Queens and Supplies. 
EASI. M. NICHOI.S, Ityonsville, Mass. 



You get best RESULTS from our 
Classified Liner Columns. — Try them. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



273 



PORTER BEE ESCAPE 




SAVES 
TIME HONEY MONEY 

15o each, $1.05 doz. All Dealers. 

3Ianiilactured only by 

R. & E. C. PORTER, Lewistown, 111. 

SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufaduring Sedions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 

MEXICO AS 
A BEE COUNTRY 

B. A. Hadsell, owe of the largest bee-keepers 
in the world, has made six trips to Mexico, 
investigating that country as a bee country, 
and is so infatuated with it that he is closing 
out his bees in Arizona. He has been to great 
expense in getting up a finely illustrated 32- 
page booklet describing the tropics of Mexico 
as a Bee Man's Paradise, which is also su- 
perior as a farming, stock raising and fruit 
country, where mercury ranges between 55 
and 98. Frost and sun-stroke is unknown. 
Also a great health resort. He will mail this 
book free by addressing 

B. A. HADSELL, Buckeye', Ariz. 



Bargains in Bee Supplies. 

The recent death of James Heddon leaves 
us with a large amount of Bee Fixtures and 
Supplies of almost every description, which 
will be sold at a great sacrifice. Write us for 
inventory and write at once, as these goods 
will not last long at the prices we are closing 
them out at. 

JAMES HEDDOIV'S SONS, 
Duwa^'iac, Michigan. 



W. H. Laws 

will be ready to take care of your queen 
orders, whether large or small, the coming 
season. Twenty-five years of careful breed- 
ing brings Laws' queens above the usual 
standard; better let us book your orders 
now. 

Tested queens in March; untested, after 
April 1st. About 50 first-class breeding- 
queens ready at any date. 

Prices: Tested, $1.25; 5 for $5.00; Breed- 
ers, each $5.00. Address 

AV. H. Laws, Beeville, Texas. 




SUPERIOR LINE BRED 

CARNIOLAN QUEENS 

During July, at the close of 
the clover and basswood flow, 
is the best time to do general 
re-queening. Carniolans are the best 
bees to continue rearing brood througli 
the dearth of nectar during the summer, 
thus insuring strong colonies for the 
buckwheat and fall honey flow. 

Prices: Select untested, $1 each, $9 per 
doz.; select tested, $1.50 each, $12 per 
doz.: Breeders, $5. 

Ask for our paper "Superiority of the 
Carniolan Bee." IT'S FREE. 
ALBERT G. HANN 
Scientific Queen Breeder, Tittstown. N. J. 



Established in 1878 



Italian 



faiieasian 



I will sell a limited number of one, two and 
three-frame nuclei this coming season. "The 
best bees on earth," broad statement but never- 
theless true. 100% wintered. By the way, I 
am breeding queens in Houston Heights, Texas, 
as well as here in Michigan. All apiaries isol- 
ated. Prices right, and sent free. 

A. D. D. WOOD 

Box 01, Lansing', Mieli. 

Box S-, Houston Heights, Texas. 



WANTED— BEESWAX 

\\\\\ pay highest price. 

Cash on arrival. 

Drop us a postal. 

HIIiDRETH & SEGELKEN 

265-267 Green-wicli St., 

New York, N. Y. 



274 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



QUEENS OF 

MOORE'S STRAIN 

OF ITALIANS 

PRODUCE WORKERS 

That fill the supers quick 
With honey nice and thick. 



Tliey have won a woi'ld-wide rep- 
utation for honey-grathering, hard- 
iness, gentleness, etc. 

Untested riueens, $1.00; six, 
$5.00; 12, $9.00. 

Select untested, $1.25; six, $6.00 
12. $11.00. 

Safe arrival and satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

Circular free. 



J. P. MOORE 

Queen Breeder, 
Route 1, Morgan, Ky. 



Bee-Keepers 



I will be in the market for 
large quantities of 

Clover and tiasswood 



H 



oney 



Again serve your own interests. 

Send me a sample and get my 

offer before you make a 

mistake. 



H. C Ahhrs 

West Bend, Wis. 



Sections and 
Foundation 



These are the things the bee- 
keeper needs now in a luirry. That 
is why you sliould consider 

INDIANAPOLIS 

as it is the greatest inland railroad 
center in the world. Witli this ad- 
vantage, together with our complete 
stock of first quality goods, we are 
able to fill your order "by next 
train," whicli ineans the same day 
It is received, at tlie longest. We 
furnisli Lewis goods at factory 
prices. Order now. 



The C. M. Scott Co. 

1004 E. Wasliington St., 
INBIANAFOIiIS, INDIANA. 



SATISFACTORY 

RESULTS 

Will be obtained by using MANU- 
FACTURED COMB FOUNDATION, 
whicli embodies PURITY, TOUGH- 
NESS, TRANSPARENCY, COLOR and 
the PURE BEES WAX ODOR of tlie 
NATURAL COMB as made by the 
HONEY BEE. 



SUCH IS THE 

DITTMER PROCESS 
COMB FOUNDATION 

Send for Samples. 

All other Bee Keepers' Supplies at 
prices you will appreciate. We will be 
pleased to send you our 1912 Catalog, 
for the asking. 



Gus Dittmer Co. 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



275 



RUSH orders for 



ii 



falcon 



ft 



BEE SUPPLIES 

Quick price-list. 

1000 Beeway sections $.5.50, 5M, $23.7'5 
Plain sections 2.5c per M less. 

per lb. 
5 lb. light section foundation. . .04c 
50 lb. light section foundation. . .59c 
5 lb. Medium brood foundation 57c 
50 lb. Medium brood foundation 52c 
100 Hoffman brood frames $3.00. 
10 No. 14 1-story Dtd. Hives, Cover, 
10 No. 14 1-story Dtd. Hives, cover, 
bottom, body and frames, 8- 
frame $13.50, 10-frame $15.00. 
Dovetailed supers with inside fix- 
tures but no sections or starters, 8- 
frame, 5, $2.50; 10, $4.80; 10-frame. 
5, $2.75; 10, $5.30. 

Condensed Rush Order directions, 
sections and supers — Give dimensions 
of sections. Hives and supers, state 
whether 8-frame or 10-franie. 

Order- any article not mentioned, 
send money and we will even up with 
foundation. The best price will be 
given for every article with the "FAL- 
CON" guarantee of satisfaction. 

W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

Where the good bee-hives come from. 
Factory, Falconer, N. Y. 



WANTED 



Extracted Honey 



I buy directly from the beekeepers 
and sell it directly to consumers, and 
am therefore always in a position to 
pay you the best price for your honey. 

It will therefore pay you before you 
sell your ' crop to send me samples of 
the different grades of honey you have 
and the amount you have of each kind 
and how put up, and quote ma the 
price you ask for each kind delivered 
in Preston. I pay cash on arrival of 



M. V. FACEY 

PRESTON, FiriLiMOBX: CO., 

MINN. 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young basswood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 



Michigan Honey 
Wanted 



We buy heavily every year. 
Have dealt with a good many 
members of the Michigan As- 
sociation. Cash paid. Write us 
at once, stating what you have, 
how put up, and price. 



F. P. Reynolds h Co. 

Woodbridge and Griswold Sts., 
DETROIT, MICH. 



276 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Why Not REAR Your Own QUEENS? 

Doolittle's "Scientific Queen-Rearing" and the tf^ ^ ^^^^ 
American Bee Journal for 1912— Both for Only ^XmWW 

Kvery Bee-keeper Should Have Both Book and 
Bee-Papef. 

DOOLITTLE'S "Scientific Queen-Rearing" book 
contains 126 pages, and is bound in leatherette 
with round corners. It tells in the clearest 
way possible just how the famous queen-breeder, 
Mr. G. M. Doolittle, rears the best of queen-bees 
in perfect accord with Nature's way. It is for 
lioth amateur and veteran in bee-keeping. As all 
know. Mr. Doolittle has spent some 40 years in 
rearing queens and producing honey. He has no 
superior as a queen-breeder. You can learn to rear 
fine queens by following his directions. Read up 
now before tlie bee season is here. 

You will not regret having this book, which also 
gives his management of the bees for the produc- 
tion of honey. 

The book, and the American Bee Journal for 
1912, for only $1.00, is certainly a big bargain for 
you. Send the $1.00 now, and we will begin your 
subscription with January 1, 1912, and mail you 
this book. Sample copy of the Bee Journal free. 





.\ddi'ess 

AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL, 



HAMILTON, ILL. 




Shaf er Meets You '^eZ". 
Face to Face 



I Want You to Know 




That you are losing big, hard dollars every day that you continue to sell your honey the ordinary 
way. I put my system before you. It's been tried and tested. It's defeated cheaper competition 
at every turn. It's created a new way. One sale makes more. Your customers will tell their 
friends. You will increase your profit on every section and sell four to one because 

lt*s Modern, lt*s Clean, If s Sanitary, It's Attractive, It's Proven a Success 

Send for complete FREE sample of successful selling plan to 

W. S. SHAFER, Dept. B., 2311 N Street, South Omaha, Nebraska. 



USE THIS COUPON 



M. H. HINT & SON 

General Agents for Root's Goods 

Lansing:, Mich. 

Dear Sirs: — 

Please quote me your prices on the at- 
tached list of bee supplies 1 need. Also 
send me your G4-page catalog, and a 
complimentary copy of "The Bee Keeper 
and The Fruit Grower." 



Name 

Address. 



"Grigrg's Saves you Freight." 

TOLEDO 

For me! Is every bee-man's guide when 
he wishes goods quick. 

Big stock Root's goods ready to ship 
same day order is received. 

Wholesale prices on Chick Feed, Beef 
Scrap, Grit, Shells, etc. 

Honey and Beeswax wanted. 

Catalogue Free. 

S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 

26 N. Erie St. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



277 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 

" SAWS 

in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 

384 Ruby Street, Rockford, Illinois. 




"If goods are wanted quick, send to Pouder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
jMy equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 
excelled. 

PAPER HONEY JARS 

For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis.Ind. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 



When You Buy Lewis Beeware 
You Get... 



LEWIS QUALITY — Which means that all Lewis Hives are made out of clear white 
pine, and Lewis sections made out of fine bright basswood. The material in these 
goods is the best obtainable and selected by experts. 

LEWIS WORKMAIVSHIP — The Lewis factory is equipped with the latest improved 
machinery constantly watched over by experts. The Lewis head mechanic has 
had thirty-five years of bee supply experience, the superintendent of bee hive de- 
partment twenty-nine years, the superintendent of sections twenty-eight years. 
These and many other skilled men have a hand in all the Lewis goods you buy. 

LEWIS PACKING — All Lewis Beeware is carefully and accurately packed — a patent 
woven wood and wire package made only by the Lewis Company, is employed largely 
in packing — this makes the package light, compact and damage-proof. 

LEWIS SERVICE — Years ago all goods were shipped direct from the factory with 
attending high freight ratts and delays during the honey season — now Lewis Bee- 
ware can be obtained almost at your own door. Over thirty distributing houses 
carrying Lewis Beeware by the carload are dotted all over the United States and 
foreign countries. Write for the name of the one nearest you. 

G. B. LEWIS COMPANY 

Manufacturers of Beeware WATERTOWN, WIS. 



278 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



The Shamu Patent Roller Entrance 

HIVE BOTTOM 



Makes Bee-Keepingf Pleasant and Profitable 

for Both 
^ Amateur 

and Professional 




spring and for Robbers' Small Entrance. 



Because it . . . 



Keeps colony warm for 1)reeding up l)y shutting out cold winds, snow 
and sleet in early spring months. 

Allows for feeding in a honey dearth without heing ii\terrupted. 

Controls swarming. 

Protects against robher bees. 

Insures mating queens with the right kind of drone to suit the bee- 
keeper. 




Showing the Large Entrance to Hive on Rollers 
when Desired. 

Enables you to separate the drones from the worker bees without con- 
flicting with the working of the hive. 

Allows for ample ventilation in the hight of the honey flow. 

Can be instantly closed so that bees may be moved from one yard to 
another, or in and out of cellar. 



The price is reasonable and the 
comfort, profit and satisfaction 
from its use repay you many times 
over. 




Price $l.oO f. o. b., Liverpool, „. . „ . . , . ., a, ,i j^ 

NT \- Arlrlr^cc ^11 rnmmiin i.-p- Showing Feeder and Ventilator. Also Used for 

J\. \. Address all communica- Store Room for Extra Boards and Roller 
tions to when Not in Use. 

Dr. CHAS. G. SHAMU 



Box 48 



Liverpool, N. Y. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 279 



n 



Fill out this Crop Report Blank at once, and send 
it to The National Bee -Keepers* Association, 
230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 



At the January meeting the Board of Directors passed a resohition that 
the Secretary should get a crop report from every memlier of the National 
Association, and from it compile a report to he sent to every memher, giving 
him the facts concerning the honey crop, as well as some information con- 
cerning the markets. Do not hesitate to report the facts promptly and 
honestly, as they will he used for your good. They should reach this office 
not later than juiv 2.5th. 



Name 

Address 

Numher colonies, spring count? .....Will you have 

comb honey for snle? How put up? 

h'rom what source gathered? 

Estimated amount? Will you have extracted honey for sale? 

How put up? 

F"rom what source gathered? 

Estimated amount j' Have vou bees for sale? 

How many colonies? Do you wish to buy bees? ;.... 

When? How many colonies? 

Have you beeswax for sale? How many pounds? 

How many colonies did you have in the spring of 1911? 

How many spring of 1912? How many pounds of 

honey did you produce in 1911? How manv in 1912? 



All subscribers to the Review, as well as all members to the "National," are asked to 
fill out and send in this report. It will be the only way that we can give you definite 
facts concerning the honey croji, and thus arm you with the information you must have to 
be able to intelligently set a price upon your honey crop this year. 

Yours truly, 

E. B. TYRRELL, Secretary. 



280 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



This Can for 20 cts., in Crates of 50. 

F.O.B. Detroit. 




For this same can, packed two in 
a box, the price is 60c per box. 
Note the paneled sides, the inner 
seal, and remember the tin is heavy. 
Size of can, 9^ square by 1 3^3 
inches high, with 1 % inch cork 
lined, inner seal, screw cap. 



ThisPait for Pa cfs., in Crates of 100. 

F.O.B. Detroit 



A friction top pail. Put in the 
honey, push down the cover, and you 
have no leakage. Size of pail, 6^3 
inches in diameter by 7 inches high. 




Write for descriptive circular giving 
full particulars, prices, and freight 
rates, to 

Ttie National Bee-Keepers' Association 

230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Mich. 




.^ 



r 



No. so 



No. 51 



No. 52 



No. 53 



Glass Packages 

For Honey. 

According to instructions given by the Board of Directors, we have 
made arrangements with one of the largest glass manufacturers to fur- 
nish our members with glass packages this year. Only four sizes were 
selected, and it is hoped that as large orders will be sent in as possible, 
for what we do this year will determine whether we can get even better 
arrangements next year. On car lots either for these lour sizes or for 
any special size, write and we will see if we can get you a still closer 
price. 

No. 50 Jar holds one pound of honey. Has tin screw cap. Packed 2 
dozen in a corrugated paper case, at 85c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. 

Xo. 51 .Jar holds % of a pound of honey. Tin screw cap. Packed 2 
dozen in a corrugated paper case, at G5c per case. F. O. B. Pittsburgh. 

No. 52 Jellie, holds % pound of honey. Tin cap. Packed 2 dozen in 
a corrugated paper case, at 40c per case. Packed 4 dozen in a case 
at 70c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. Per barrel, 13c per dozen, plus 
50c for the barrel. 

No. 5.3 Squat Jellie, holds }4 pound honey. Tin cap. Packed only in 
cases holding G dozen, at 90c per case, or by the barrel at 13c per 
dozen, plus 50c for the barrel, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. A barrel holds 
from 20 to 25 dozen jellies. 

Be sure and send in your orders in plenty of time, sending cash with 
the same. These prices for members and subscribers only. 

THE NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSOCIATION, 



v.. 



230 Woodland Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 



.J 




ROOTS 

BEEXEEPERS 
SUPPLIES 




You may have a catalog of supplies; but if you haven't ours for 1912 you have missed 
something really worth while, and should get one at once. It is the largest and most complete 
ever published — more than a mere price list of supplies — a book that every beekeeper can read 
with pleasure and profit. Beginners will find answers to many perplexing questions, and ad- 
vanced beekeepers timely suggestions that will save them money. Old customers are writing us 
frequently letters like the following: 

Your catalog for 1912, designated ROOT'S BEEKEEPERS' SUPPLIES, is received, 
and I certainly thank you for this book. I have had your catalog on my desk for 
years, and have used Root's supplies all along. I note the enlargement and improve- 
ment in your new catalog, and notice many things I expect to add to my apiary. 

Crystal City, Texas. C. W. Cox. 

Our catalog this season also gives a full and complete list of books and booklets which we 
can supply. Many of these booklets are free, which doesn't mean that they are not worth read- 
ing, but simply that we want you to be informed on the subjects of which they treat. Send for a 
catalog, and check those in which you are interested. 



Quick Deliveries 



Next to having the best goods made, there is nothing so important to tlie beekeeper in the 
busy season as to have goods delivered just when they are wanted most. It isn't always possible 
to ship goods from a distant factory and have them reach destination within a day or two, as 
is sometimes necessary during the height of the season, but with distributing-houses located in 
the large shipping-centers we are able to supply beekeepers everywhere, with no loss of time 
and with minimum transportation charges. 



Send Your Hurry Orders 



to any one of the offices listed below, and let us show you what we can do for you in point of 
service. Cars are going to these branches at the rate of two or three a week, so the stocks are 
new and fresh, and we usually have just what you want. If it isn't in stock at your nearest 
branch our manager will include your order with his specifications and you may have your goods 
come in the next car, thereby saving on transportation charges and getting the goods in better 
shape than you would by local freight. 



Whatever Your Wants 



we can supply you, and, of course, there is no question about the quality of our goods. The 
name "ROOT" in connection with bee-supplies means the best of every thing in this line, and 
the best is always the cheapest, as our customers will testify. If you have never used our 
supplies you should make a trial of them this season. Once used, we are sure you will want 
no other. 

I have just received my goods, order No. 10,739. I am more than pleased with 
them. I had intended to make my bives, but when I received the sample hive and saw 
the_ No. 1 pine lumber from which it was made, and considering the workmanship, _ I am 
satisfied I can buy cheaper than I can make them; enough cheaper to save the price of 
the lumber. O. C. Mills, Barton Ldg., Vt. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

Kew York, 139-141 Franklin St. Cliicagro, 213-231 Institute Place 

Philadelphia, 8-10 Tine St. Des Moines, 565 VT. Seventh St. 

St. Paul, 1024 Mississippi St. Syracuse, 1631 Genesee St. 

Washing-ton, 1100 Maryland Ave. S-W. 
Mechanic Falls, Maine 



Distributing" Depots in Many 
Iiarg-e Centers 

The A. I. Root Company 

Executive Offices and Factory 

MEDINA, OHIO 





THE CHAS. F, MAY CO., PRINTERS, D ETROIT, M ICH . 





^ — ' Pilfi1i«tiQ/4 \l\r\niU\ii 



PubJishGd Mont% 




AUG. 
1912 

"•^ "▼- -V 

DETROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 



This Big Touring C ai' $ 1600 

Completely Equipped 

[aJciejccajir 



A classy big- car — that will fairly fly over the roads. De- 
signed for the utmost comfort and attractiveness. Five 
passengfer capacity. 




SEIiF-STARTER, TOO. 



^ The special features of the Cartercar make this the best 
popular priced tourinp' cs value on the market. It has the 
patented Friction Transmission which makes it far superior 
to any gear driven car from an efficiency standpoint. It 
will climb a 50% g:--,' -has any number of speeds — one 
lever control — no jerks or jars- ■'^d .c the usual gears. 

^ Four other excellent ^ are every one lead- 

ers in their class. Full floating rear axle, valve encased 
motor, th-ee •j.aitc. rear elliptic springs, and all modern 
ideas. Let us send ,ou catalog. 

Cartercar Ciinpany 

, - wi/ "iuc, Michigan 

BRANCHES: NEW T02'" , CHXCAaO, DETROIT, KANSAS CITY. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 281 



SURE. Ql D COMBS ARE 
VALUABLE 

If Shipped to Us for Rendering. 

We Extract 99V2 Per Cent of Wax 

And then pay you Highest Market Prices 
Or 2 cents additional in Trade. 

YOU CANT APPROACH THAT FOR PROFIT. 

We need great quantities of Comb and Extracted Honey. 

Write us. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO. 

" The Busy Bee Men " 
51 Walnut St. CINCINNA7I, O. 



White Comb Honey 

Fancy and No. 1. 

We Need Large (s^uantities and 
Can Use You^s 

WRITE US 



American Butter & Cheese Co. 

31-33 Griswold St. Detroit, Mich. 



282 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



'^LtVELANOHI 



THE COAST LINE 



City or D| 



'^, 



'°n 



j-iiife 



DETROIT 

CLEVELAND 
BUFFALO 

NIAGARA FALLS 






TOLEDO 
PT. HURON 

CODE RICH 
ALPENA ST.ICNACE 



>\\^>\n\^n\n\\\v::>ana::: 



THE CHARMS OF OUR SUMMER SEAS 

Spend your vacation on the Great Lakes, the most economical and enjoyable outing in America. 
WHERE YOU CAN GO 

Daily service is operated between Detroit and Cleveland, Detroit and Buffalo; four trips 
weekly between Toledo, Detroit. Mackinac Island and way ports; daily service between 
Toledo, Cleveland and Put-in-Bay. During July and August, two boats out of Cleveland and 
Detroit, every Saturday and Sunday night. 

A Cleveland to Mackinac special steamer will be operated two trips weekly from June 15th to 
September 10th. stopping only at Detroit every trip and Goderich. Ont.. every other trip. 

Railroad Tickets Available on Steamers. Special Day Trips Between 
Detroit and Cleveland, During July and August. 

Send 2 cent stamp for Illustrated Pamphlet and Great Lakes Map. 
Address: L. G. Lewis, G. P. A., Detroit, Mich. 
Philip H. McMillan, Pres. A. A. Schantz, Gen'l Mgr. 

Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company 



522SSS5S5SS55S55S55SSSSSSSSSSS 




Special Delivery 

During this month we shall double our usual efforts in points of delivery and service. 
Early indications not having been most favorable, it is possible many beekeepers will not 
laid in a sufficient stock of supplies, such as sections and foundation, for the clover 



have laid in a sufficient stock of supplies, such as sections and toundation, tor tne clove 
and basswood this month. We are prepared to make up for this oversight by having 
large stock of both sections and foundations on hand for instant delivery. We carr 
nothing but the Root make, which insures the best quality of everything. We sell a 
factory prices, thereby insuring a uniform rate to everyone. The saving on t 
charges from Cincinnati to points south of us will mean quite an item to b 

4-1-.i.~ ♦■ii.-.-if ^.-T, \Afo n ,-c. c/^ l/-ionto/l t-linf wrf^ ^nn I'naL-.i iminPr^iatp clTintTIPnt f 



We sell at 

transportation 

^ nnaii to points souin oi us win mean quuc au iicm lu beekeepers in 

this "territory. We are so located that we can make immediate shipment of any order 

the day it is received. 



Honey and Wax 



If you haven't made arrangements for the disposition of your honey and wax tor 
this season, consult us. We buy both in large quantities, and can assure you of fair 
and courteous treatment, and a good price for your crop. 

Shipping-cases 

lb sell your crop to the best advantage it must be well put up in attractive style. 
We have shipping cases that answer every requirement of looks and utility. Small pro- 
ducers who sell their crops locally will be interested in the cartons in which comb honey 
is put up to sell to the fancy customers at top-notch prices. We have honey-cans, too, in 
cases for those who produce extracted honey. In fact, there isn't anything we don't have 
that the beekeeper needs, cither to produce his crop or help to sell it. 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 



2 1 46 Central Ave. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



283 



IF BEES COULD TALK 



They Would Say: 

"GIVE as 



'Dadant's Foundation' 



IT'S CLEAN, IT'S PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES " 



If you are not using "DAD ANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DADANT & SON S, I*lT.',!?5°i'I: 
A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 



The Shamu Patent Roller Entrance 

HIVE B OTTOM 

Makes Bee-Keeping Pleasant 
and Profitable for Both Ama- 
teur and Professional Because 
It . . . 

Keeps colony warm for breeding 
up by shutting out cold winds, snow 
and sleet in early spring months. 
Allows for feeding in a honey 
~'_j dearth without being interrupted. 

Controls swarming. 
Protects against robber bees. 
Insures mating queens with the 
Drone Escape in Place; also Queen and Drone right kind of drone to suit the bee- 

Excluders turned in. keeper. 

Enables you to separate the drones from the worker bees without conflicting with the 
working of the hive. 

Allows for ample ventilation in the hight of the honey flow. 

Can be instantly closed so that bees may be moved from one j'ard td another, or in 
and out of cellar. 

The price is reasonable and the comfort, profit and satisfaction from its use repay you 
many times over. 

Price $1.50 f. o. b. Liverpool, N. Y. Address all communications to 




DR. CHAS. G. SHAMU 



Box 48 



Liverpool, N. Y. 



284 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSOCIATION 

Office OF Pu BLiCATiON ... 230 Woodlan d Aven ue 

VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, AUGUST 1, 1912, No. 8. 

Importance of Specialization. 

M. V. FACEY. 

' "Jl X the August Review, ^Ir. Demuth takes exception to my say- 
Tl ing that a certain bee-keeper with 300 colonies of bees en- 
gaged in the honey business to his loss, with the remark that 
this man had too little to do instead of too much. It seemed to 
him that possibly my business as a dealer may have influenced my 
point of view. 

If ^Iv. Demuth will take the trouble to look back over my writ- 
ings he will find I have been more of a bee-keeper than a dealer, 
handling from 500 to GOO colonies, besides extending repeated help 
to my farmer friends. In doing this work I did all my work with- 
out help at all times except during the surplus season, when I had 
my extracting crews. 

Aly experience in the bee and honey line has been rather varied 
and extensive. The result of experience has been to make a thor- 
ough believer in specialization of me. The successful specialist in 
bee-keeping is the result of education, experience and development. 
Xo person can launch into bee-keeping as a specialist from the be- 
ginning. He first has his small yard in connection with his farm. 
his poultry or some other source of income, by which he can turn 
his penny. In this way experience is gained, then more bees are 
added, less work in other lines, then more bees and more bees until 
all attention, all work, all thought and energy is concentrated upon 
the bees. How many hees should the specialist keep? This will 
depend upon the subject. One person may only succeed in handling 
300 or possibly 400 colonies, another 500, another 600 or more,- but 



286 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

that number will necessarily depend upon the operator and must be 
determined by him. One law the bee-keeper, as a bee-keeper, should 
set down as a law unchangeable and settled : That is, that all other 
work and every other interest must yield to the demands of the bee 
3'ard. If you are going- to make a real big success of your bees you 
have to give them your best thought and then more thought, and do 
not be satisfied until all your bees are doing their very best. 

It makes me tired sometimes when I see a bee-keeper satisfied 
with half the crop of honey which should be his and making believe 
that he is getting the best crop possible. The call to get more bees 
is right. The more bees the better until the beeman has all the bees 
he can handle, but whoever, in his ambition for numbers, fails to 
get the best out of his bees and fails to unravel the secret by which 
the continuous energy of bees is sustained, is hardly the successful 
bee-keeper. 

In securing the largest possible yield — and the large yield really 
involves no more work than the smaller one — bee-keepers have much 
to learn yet. Neither will they learn until they dare to be, if nec- 
essary, unconventional to think for themselves, and Xo dare to strike 
off along new lines if necessary. What I am trying to mipress upon 
my readers have been abundantly proven by my experience of this 
year. 

I do not keep bees as largely now as in the past. Last spring I 
had fifty colonies in our yard. I sold eight of these colonies, and 
increased the remaining 42 colonies to 100 colonies, v/hich are each 
occupying from two to three stories. I sold 17 queens and pro- 
duced over 5,000 pounds of surplus honey, ripened and capped in 
the hive before extracting. If you write to any of my neighbors 
or any one in Southern Minnesota, you will find that our past season 
has been very poor, with not exceeding half a crop of honey. En- 
tire time occupied, about two weeks. Had I not paid due attention 
to the uniform inspiration of my yard with energy, I would have 
been well pleased with 50 pounds per colony. 

WHV IiARGZ: BEE-KEEFIIRS CANNOT SEIiIi THEIB HONEV. 

I have always advised the small bee-keeper to market his own 
honey. Most of them can do it and should. By selling it them- 
selves, I mean by other ways than wholesaling it. But the man 
with the 300 colonies was busying himself with all his might in the 
honey business and neglected his bees. He was doing a lot of 
work, but he spread himself out so much, and sought to cover so 
many things, that he left many loose ends. He sold his honey and 
made two or three hundred dollars more upon it, but he lost his 
bees. He had the ability to properly care for and save his bees, he 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 287 

had the ability to sell his honey. He sold it and lost his bees. 
Did he gain or lose? 

BEE-KEEPING AND HONET-SEIiIiING BOTH SFECIAIiTIES. 

I know something of bee-keeping and I know something about 
selling honey. My experience has taught me that either occupation 
requires the very best there is in a person. If you are going to suc- 
ceed as a bee-keeper you will give that work precedence to every- 
thing else. Everything else will be neglected for your bees, and you 
win. I am not writing this for the one who loiters or forgets. A 
bee-keeper can never be his best, and forget. If he is sufficiently 
alive he ought to make more from his 300 colonies than his neigh- 
bor with all his varied interests. 

If you are a dealer the same holds. Let no man think he can 
make any great success as a dealer in honey and not give the work 
the very best there is in him. His business is his constant thought, 
his ambition, his endeavor and when we have done our best there 
are many problems ahead of us awaiting our solution. No man is 
versatile or capable enough to do justice to both. He is a less 
efficient bee-keeper than he might be by being a dealer; he is less 
efficient as a dealer by being a bee-keeper, and in the honey business 
no person can afford to be less efficient. He should be more effi- 
cient and still more, and there is ample scope for all the thought 
and energy and intelligence he has to spare. 

HOW BEE-KEEFEBS HAVE I.OST BV BETAIIiING THEIB OWN CBOF. 

There has been no great gain to bee-keepers in the past in re- 
tailing their own crop. There are but few sections of the country 
untouched by the depressing influence of the "direct from bee- 
keeper" honey, and in some sections they have been selling it at 
retail for less than wholesale prices, while a great many retail their 
honey at less than a cent per pound advance over the wholesale 
price. The depressing effect of this habit is so great that were it 
not for it bee-keepers might now be receiving at wholesale as much 
for their honey as we mail order dealers receive for our honey, and 
were it not for the fact that many bee-keepers — perhaps the major- 
ity — do not understand grading their honey, prices would be lower 
than they are now. 
Preston, jMinn. 

[Those of you who read Mr. Demuth's article will remember that I indorsed 
what he said. And now I am willing to indorse what Mr. Faccy says. The fact 
is that both of these gentlemen are together on the main point, and that is "spe- 
cialization." 

Mr. Demuth found that when he had but little to do, he took as much time 
to do it as when he had a lot to do. In the latter case he was obliged to systemize 
his work, and work along definite plans. Mr. Facey started out as a bee-keeper, 
and tinally drifted to honey selling. He finds that either job is big enough for 



288 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



one man, and from what he writes I know that he works along definite Hnes, or 
by a system. 

But what I want you to notice most, is the fact that selling honey is a busi- 
ness. Too many pay but little attention to the selling end. Others do not ask or 
get the price they should. Each man is trying to be a salesman, when but few 
are capable. 

This very fact is one cause of the farmer not getting his proportion of the 
selling price for his produce. It is also true of the bee-keeper. When he gets 
together with his brother bee-keeper, and picks one man to do his selling for him, 
then will he reap his full reward, and not before.] 



Adventures of a Queen. 

F. L. POLLOCK. 

'^^^ HE queen in question was an Italian and came from a south- 

\^j ern breeder. She arrived in May, and was introduced to a 

hybrid colony, which promptly balled her. I rescued her by 

dropping the ball into a cup of water, and tried again, and this time 

she was accepted. 

Later in the summer, when opening the hive, I found her balled 
again. Again I saved her, but the colony did not seem to do well, 
and I supposed that she had probably been injured so as to be of 
little use. 

Her colony was wintered in the cellar, got dysentery rather 
badly, and came out very weak in the spring. I had been absent 
from the yard one day in April, but, on returning late in the after- 
noon, I found that this colony Avas being robbed. Knowing that 
they were too weak to fight 1 carried the hive into the cellar, but 
when I examined them next morning I found that the robbing had 
been done. All the honey had been carried ofY, the brood destroyed, 
but, strangeh', the queen was still alive, with about a hundred bees 
with her. 

The colony was done for, however, so I carried the frame oi 
bees and the queen to another yard, where a colony had become 
queenless during the winter and was very weak. About ten daA^s 
later I looked into the hi\'e, and found that I had intervened too 
late. There were not more than two dozen bees left, scattered all 
through the hive, and the queen was all alone on a comb, but laying 
eggs with apparent tranquility. 

It was another colony gone, but I picked up the queen and 
dropped her into another queenless colony. This one had only re- 
cently lost their queen, and had plenty of stores, but only two 
frames of bees and one of brood. It was in a ten-frame, chaff-packed 
hive. 

I covered them up warmly, contracted the entrance, and left 
them alone, expecting them to die, for I felt sure that that queen 
had endured too many hardships of life to be of much further value. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 289 

About a month afterwards I noticed a great many l)ees coming 
and going from this hive, and fancied that it might be dead and 
being robbed. I opened it and was amazed. 

I do not he when I say that there were fully eight frames solid 
with live bees, and seven frames full of brood. That long-sufifering 
queen must have started at once laying to her full capacity, and the 
hive was so warmly packed that a few bees were able to take care 
cf a great deal of brood. This shows again the value of spring 
protection. 

That queen had traveled a thousand miles in a mailing cage, 
had been balled twice, had two colonies killed under her. been rob- 
bed out once, and survived to build up one of the best colonies in 
the yard out of a weak nucleus. I am going to use her for a 
breeder this year. 

StoufYville, Ont., Can. 



A Discussion of Those Picture Grading Rules. 

BY THE SUBSCRIBERS. 

{Continued from July.) 

• ^ y^ \\'E.STERN subscriber, who does not want his name used, 
^„^\, takes an unfavorable view of the illustrations shown and 
also criticises in a measure the rules adopted by the Col- 
orado Association. He says in part as follows : 

"I am sorry to see you print above (juotations of honey, the 
illustration you do as to grading. I suppose you use the eastern 
grading rules as to basis for the cuts. Having graded nearly ac- 
cording to Colorado rules for years, we cannot but think it puts 
Colorado and western honey at a disadvantage in selling to dealers. 
Your Fancy is exactly like Colorado Number 1. Your Number 1 
is Colorado Number 3, and )^our Number 2 is Colorado culls. Re- 
gardless of all rules. I would not case up and offer for sale, except 
as culls, a sample like the one you call Number 'I. It is a lower 
grade than ought to be offered on the market at all, as it is a dis- 
appointment to any case buyer and to the poor customers who do 
not feel they can afford 20c or 25c for a cake of honey. This would 
naturally cost him 3 2c to 15c to let the dealer out whole, and the 
purchaser would be paying about 50c a pound for what he buys of 
real honey. 

"Then any dealer who has bought such Number 2 will not pay 
much for Number 2 again, and our good Number 2 will be sold 
accordingly. It creates fraud and mis-representation to have several 
systems of grading in the country, and I had hoped the National 
would revise its rules, so as to come nearer to the ordinarv run of 



290 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




Mr. J. Allan's Oakleigh Apiary with residence in the rear and honey house at the right. Mr. Allan is 

one of New Zealand's leading bee-keepers and is president ot the 

Southland Bee-Keepers' Association. 

crops, using- fancy only for perfect sections of honey. The Col- 
orado rules are a little too strict in some ways, not elastic enough 
as to weight to suit all conditions, as I have had finely finished 
white honey that would fall ^^2 to 1 pound below the Number 1 
weight, requiring Number 2 grade to be assigned it. This wrongs 
the producer, as practically in poor years we may not have a case up 
to full weight in 1,000 cases, but according to Colorado rules, we 
would have to drop 25c to 35c a case, in price, on account of one 
pound shortage. I think there should be some way of grading this 
as Number 1 and indicating the weight. The dealer who retails 
his honey by the cake gets full price, and the producer ought not to 
lose more than the actual shortage in the weight according to the 
class or grade to which the quality and finisii of the honey would 
justly entitle it. But to allow any honey to be put in a case for 
general market as poor as 3'our sample of Number 2 would be a 
detriment to all producers, as when you allow so bad a sample to 
be put into a case, there are so many bee-keepers of so many ideas 
as to what is fair in selling, it is likely there would be a mixture 
of culls sold for Number 2 as to disgust every one who would g^et 
a case of it, while Ijy holding a Number 2 to a good fair weight, 
but allowing some imperfections in finish it enables producers to 
sell at a fair price what would otherwise be on hand to dispose of. 
Possibly would call Number 1 such a grade, but Number 1 to most 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



291 



people means Xumber 1 regardless of a Fancy, and as we have to 
sell mostly to people who have not a technical education in honcA- 
production, it would seem that the Colorado rules are better than 
your illustrations are numbered, and if weights were attached to 
Colorado gradings, so as to allow a light Xumber 1, and a Xumber 
3 to take honey not below 12 ounces in weight, but in some ways 
not up to Xumber 2, it would fit the conditions of production better 
and the reasonable rights and expectation of the average purchaser." 

While we are discussing the Colorado rules, let us read what 
Director Foster has to say regarding the same. 'Sir. Foster has not 
only had experience in producing honey, but also knows what it is 
to be on the road as a traveling salesman selling the honev to the 
trade. His views can not help but be based upon experience. 

"The discussion of the pictures used in the Review at the head 
of the honey quotation page, has brought out some good points. 
And I will try and add a few more. The idea of using pictures to 
show the way to grade comb honey has been used by the Colorado 
State Bee-Keepers' Association for a good many years, and has 
worked well except that weight and color cannot be shown to ad- 
vantage. In the main it is a success. The comb honey producer 
should use a top and bottom starter, and from the appearance of the 
three sections in the picture no bottom starters were used. The 




A frame of Queen Cells from the Apiary of Mr. Robert Gibbs of Southland, New Zealand. 

Mr. Gibbs was formerly a New Zealand government expert, but has now 

taken up queen rearing privately. 



292 



THE BEE-KEEPERS REVIEW 



so-called Number 2 shows the result to a frightful degree. AMiether 
3^ou grade by the Colorado rules or any other rules T believe that 
any intelligent person will agree with me that no section the comb 
of which is attached only half way down on one side and but a 
third on the other, and not coming closer than an inch to the bot- 
tom, should be classed in any sliipping grade. It would not even 
ship safely in one of ]\Ir. Crane's paper cases. I do not believe in 
classing culls as grades at all. One man told me that if we adopted 
such strict grading that he could not sell half his honey. My an- 
swer was that his producing methods were forty years behind the 
times. If half of one's honey is such as this so-called Number 2, it 
is the fault of the bee-keeper and not that of the rules. 

"The section called Number 1 has a few open cells besides 
those of the outside row next to the wood, which according to the 
Colorado rules disqualifies it from the Number 1 grade, but I might 
say that the fact is there is a good deal of honey no better capped 
than this goes into the Number 1 grades. Bee-men are unwilling to 
see the unsealed cells, it seems. A few mistakes are made by fail- 
ing to look on both sides of a section when grading. 

"The Colorado rules now recognize four shipping grades, which 
admits of more of the honey being uniform in the cases than when 
there are but three grades. The nearer we can come to having 
every section like the others in the case the better will the buyers 
he satisfied. 




Apiary of Mr. Wm. Turns of Montague, Mich. These bees are 
kept in the heart of town. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



293 




The place where J. B. Holsinger of Johnstown, Pa., keeps sweet. 
A nice looking apiary, friend Holsinger. 

"You say that the Colorado rules might be unjust to the Col- 
orado bee-men when Number 1 honey is sold as fancy grade. There 
may be something in this but very little. Colorado honey sold intel- 
ligently brings as near what it is worth as any. We now have a 
fancy grade, however, which is just our Number 1 white, called a 
fancy grade. It may help the buyers some in knowing what they 
are getting. Of course now our Number 1 grade may be sold as 
fancy too, but if the principle of giving the buyer no better goods 
than he expects from the average honey producer is adopted by all, 
where is the improvement in methods to come in? There is one 
thing sure : the bee-keepers of the country never march as one solid 
phalanx. There are some who have to do the pioneering in intelli- 
gent grading, and out in the west we have found that it pays when 
the buyers once find out what you have got. Maybe you will get 
the shiftless man's price one year, but it don't last forever. 

■'I believe that National grading rules are a possibility, but they 
should recognize the standard section, full separatored and packed 
in the double tier shipping case only. Grading rules cannot be made 
for every size and style of section. 

"The Colorado rules may not be perfect, but they have been 
adopted, amended and discussed by more extensive producers than 
any others. They are the result of experience both on the producing 
and selling side with the market at the best price ever in mind." 

Mr. Isaac V. Lobdell, of Troy, N. Y., is well pleased with the 



294 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

cuts shown, saying- that "It is an object lesson that will help won- 
derfully in the matter of grading." 

Another subscriber, Mr. C. S. Gailbreath, of Beresford, Florida, 
writes : "Those cuts at head of grading rules are just the thing. 
\Miy was it not done before? \\'e learn more from a glance at the 
picture than we could from reading the rules many times." 

Mr. R. B. Slease, of Roswell, New ^Mexico, does not favor the 
pictures as shown. In writing me he says: "I have been intend- 
ing to write you about those sections of honey you have been show- 
ing on the grading proposition, ever since I first saw them, but 
have kept putting it off till now. What you show as fancy is noth- 
ing more than a fair Xo. 1. Your No. 1 is strictly a No. 2, and 
should not go in No. 1 under any circumstances, and your No. 2 is 
a cull not fit to go on the market at all. All such sections should 
either be cut out and run through the capping can or extracted and 
used as bait sections." 



Improving Your Bees While Producing Honey. 

GEO. B. HOWE. 

{Contihticd from June iiiiiiiber.) 

Environment has much to do with your queens. Remember 
that and do not be careless if others are. You will find it pays to 
do things right, even in queen rearing. 

NON-SWARMING BEES. 

Is it impossible to breed a non-swarming strain of bees? Now 
let us take this matter up in a sensible way, and look at both sides. 
Do you think that just because you used an incubator to hatch your 
chickens, that you would get a non-setting strain of poultry? 

Some seem to think that because we rear our queens artificially 
by using cell cups that we will soon get a strain that would not 
swarm. I would like to ask any bee-keeper that don't believe it 
possible to breed a non-swarming strain of bees, "Hozu long has he 
been breeding from a strain of bees that are not given to swarming, 
or seldom swarms?" After breeding bees for six 3^ears, I thought I 
had got practically a non-swarming strain, as in the six years they 
did not swarm any to speak of. 

Then judge of my surprise, and I might soy disgust, on the 
seventh year to have them swarm for a couple of days as though 
they were possessed. It was a)i unusual season, and was reported 
one of the worst seasons on record for swarming. 

It rather changed my mind on non-swarming bees, but should 
it? I knoiif now that I should have expected it, for the reason bees 
will swarm as well as hens zvill set, if you give them the right con- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 295 

ditions. You can easily see that the poultry keeper has the best of 
the bee-keeper. He can control his males in his breeding, also their 
food. 

We surely will never get non-swarming bees until we use queen 
mothers that have a record of not swarming; also using drones of 
the same strain. The incubator will not help in the least, nor 
Avill artificial reared queens help about breeding non-swarming bees. 
But you ivili have to breed and rear your queens from colonies not given 
to swarming. I have had one experience which has greatly encour- 
aged and strengthened my belief in breeding for non-swarming. 

I had a queen, No. 116, I reared about 50 daughters from her, 
and not one of them ever swarmed. I had some of those queens 
four seasons and I never found a larvae or o^gg in a queen cell. I 
would have had more of those queens, but they were too cross. If 
I had known what I know now, I would have given them a better 
trial. I learned right there even if a queen or colony was quite cross 
and not gentle to handle it paid to breed from her, as I find that 
we sometimes get our most gentle colonies from them. That is, if 
we have the right drones to mate with them. 

The bee breeder must keep a record of all colonies to a certain 
extent. I have for the past few years been very particular after I 
put a queen cell into a colony or nucleus to be sure that she hatched 
and was accepted all right, and then followed up to know that she 
was laying in 10 or 12 days, at which time she is clipped, and then 
J knoii.'. There is no guess work about it. It will surprise some 
10 learn that at certain times bees are very reluctant about accept- 
ing even a queen hatched from a cell in their own hive, and will 
insist on rearing a queen from their own brood. I do happen to 
know that we have better honey gatherers than we did 15 or 20 
years ago, with the poor seasons and foul brood. I think that with 
the common strains of bees that we had then, there would soon be 
fewer bee-keepers left. There are very few of the common stock 
left. Foul brood has cleaned the most of them up. A\'e will and 
must breed bees that will resist this scourge, foul brood. When 
one of these bee-keepers says the black bee is good enough for him, 
I notice as soon as foul brood strikes his apiary he soon finds out 
to his sorrow that he is soon out of the bee business. 

Yours for better bees. 

Geo. B. Howe. 

[This installment completes, judging by correspondence received from my sub- 
scribers, one of the most interesting and valuable articles on queen rearing that has 
appeared in the bee journals for a long time. Mr. Howe is certainly making a 
success of bee-keeping from a honey standpoint. In the series of articles just 
finished he has given to the bee-keeping world his secrets, so that all may profit by 
his past exprience. 

While there is bound to be differences of opinions and there will no doubt be 
exceptions taken to some of the positions held by Mr. Howe, yet there is no question 



296 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



but what he has brought up some vahiable thoughts and that the article just con- 
cluded is worth a good deal to the bee-keepers. 

I have had a number of complimentary letters from the subscribers concerning 
what Mr. Howe has written. We shall hope to read more from his pen in the 
future.] 



Capping Melters — Bottom Boards — Stone Cellars. 

E. T. BAINARD. 

^^^ O the extracted honey producer nothing" has l)een more 
4^^ awkward than to have his honey house littered with tub or 
barrel draining cappings, all exposed to dust and the ever 
keen robber bee. The capping melter is certainly a welcome 
machine as it is, even though the honey that goes through it is of 
poorer grade. Buckwheat or other darker honeys may not be in- 
jured, but our lighter grades of clover are injured in color. 

I don't think the heat alone is the cause, but it is the slumgum 
or, possibly, the hot wax that discolors the honey, especially when 
compelled to separate in a gravity separator. The- current through 
this separator is downward in the direction of the How of honey 
and the heavier particles of dirt found on the bottom of a cake of 
wax could be drawn down and through the separator with the tiow 
of honey. At any rate, the honey after candying had a dirty scum 
on top, showing that honey, like warm milk, will take tip impurities 
while cooling. 

The capping melter we used the past season was made with 
two 16-inch round boilers, one inside of the other and water space 
between, but the melting surface is far too small, and the outlet on 
one side insufficient for the rapid escape of the melted product, as 
the partly melted mass of cappings moves towards the outlet and 
blocking it, even though no screen is used. In my estimation a 
capping melter shotild contain a large numl)cr of water tubes, 
similar to a steam radiator or a water cooler on an automobile, and 
the honey to escape from several openings near the bottom and 
to cool at once in small vessels. 

ANOTHER BOTTOM BOARD. 

In the February Reniew, Mr. Lee Beatipre describes a bottom 
board that I have used for years, but I am discarding it for a better 
one, for two reasons : I prefer a bottom board Avithout any front 
projection that is just the same size as the hive; rtrst, easier to 
move bees with and, second, better for wintering. The dead bees 
drop away quicker. The main board for the bottom is n>4 inches 
wide by 18^2 inches on the under side and lT,?s inches on the top 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 297 

side, the front being cut back on a bevel. The two side strips are 
J/g inches thick, 1^ inches high and 19^8 inches long. The back 
bottom cleat is J^ inches thick, 1^2 inches wide and 13^4 inches 
long, nailed under the back end. The front cleat is similar, but is 
2}'2 inches wide. As this forms part of the bottom Roor a strip >}-^ 
inches thick and 113'2 inches long closes the opening at the back 
end on top. When completed this bottom board is 13^4 inches wide 
and 197/8 inches long, the size of the Hedden hive. The entrance 
is 1^4 inches deep at the front, but only }i inches under the 
frames. 

For Avintering outside we close the ends of the entrance, but 
leave the center IJ4 inches deep by about o^i inches long. The 
bridge over the entrance in the outside w^intering case is about 3 
inches deep, nailed to the bottom of the outside packing case, and 
is about 4 inches wide. A storm door with several small holes in 
it keeps out wind and mice. 

STONE Ci:i.I.ARS. 

Years ago my father built a root cellar with walls about 18 
inches thick of solid stone. It would keep out very little frost. A 
second wall 8 inches thick of sawdust was built inside, leaving an 
inch air space. This improved it, but the mice got into the sawdust 
and destroyed the dead air space. Finally the sawdust was thrown 
out and earth banked up on the outside up to the eaves. The frost 
does not go through the earth. Stone offers the least resistance to 
frost of any of the building materials. For a cellar, cement blocks 
with air spaces would have been much warmer and drier. 

Lambeth, Ont., Canada. 



Breeding for General Improvement. 

LEO ELLIS GATELEY. 

"^^ft HAVE read wuth interest those articles in the January and 
Tl February issues, but am at a loss to understand how anyone 
can, in the light of what has been accomplished, view with 
doubt the ultimate result of the present research for an improved 
type of honey bee. That the different varieties, strains and individ- 
ual grades of bees, with which we are at present familiar, are sus- 
ceptible to all sorts of crossing and modifications, can no longer be 
doubted except by those who have made no eft'orts in such direc- 
tion. 

The mutableness of the species is admitted by Mr. Newell in 
stating that while the golden strain of Italians has probably been 
established through a continued course of selection, no reason exists 



298 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

for doubting that mutations were involved. Of the fact that years 
of close selection has made this distinctive strain what it is, there 
can be no doubt, but that mutations were used should also be evi- 
dent for the mutability of the Italian has been repeatedly demon- 
strated. 

FABTHENOGENESIS A HEI.F. 

The parthenogenetic development of the male bee is considered 
by some to be a great hindrance to rapid work in securing an im- 
proved type, but should rather be the greatest of all aids, as it obvi- 
ates the necessity of seeing that all drone producing colonies are 
headed by queens of pure mating. 

Though the mating problem is truly a serious one, it is by no 
means so difficult as to be any bar to real progress. W'here another 
extensive apiary is in close proximity and furnishing hordes of in- 
ferior drones, of course an effectual l^arrier to progress is presented. 
The only relief from such a contingency is to move, ^^'ith but few 
other bees within a radius of three or four miles, such will soon 
become Italianized and prove no hindrance to operations. Not 
always is it the case, but the drones used in fertilizing queens should 
and can, owing to parthenogenesis, be all the descendants of one 
mother, which is, of course, the breeding queen used the preceding 
year. When desirable to add new blood, to avoid consanguinity, 
or to try out another stock of bees, it should be introduced through 
the medium of the drones. 

SEI.ECT HONEV-FBODUCIITG STOCK AS BBEEDERS. 

Without doubt the most serious difficulty that is encountered 
in this work is to make intelligent selection of breeding queens. No 
queen should be used as a breeder unless her workers are above the 
average as honey gatherers and right here is where a mistake will 
be made, unless most discriminating judgment is used, and one has 
a practical knowledge of the natural laws surrounding the produc- 
tion of honey. Colonies that store above the average are generally 
those in which brood-rearing was so regulated that it had a strong 
force of workers of the right age and at exactly the critical moment 
to take advantage of the flow and may be either blacks or hybrids. 
Strictly, therefore, in regard to high yields one needs be governed 
largely by the conditions of the colony as a whole, at the time of 
selection, and also its previous management. Plainly, if one is not 
thoroughly familiar with the scientific points involved in the pro- 
duction of honey, he will be most certain to select a queen to be- 
come the head and cornerstone of his entire apiary that is not a 
mutation in the sense he expected. 

The golden Italian strain marks an epoch in breeding for im- 
provement and the builders of it are worthy of the utmost praise. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 299 

In comparison, however, with the darker strain, such as is imported 
from Italy, the yellow bees usually fall below the average in all 
points except color. It is the opinion of some that the breeding 
of this abnormal amount of color has weakened the bee in vitality, 
but this view can not be substantiated. An error has been made in 
breeding for color only and slighting the more important points of 
general improvement. Let us begin such improvement with this 
bee, and it will soon become the equal of any. 
Ft. Smith, Ark. 



A Few Further Thoughts of Co-operation. 

JAMES K. HEDSTROM. 

V^<%ITH tariff protection to shut out foreign competition in most 
Vit^ lines of business and production, there exists as never 
before a great need for co-operation. There is too mucli 
lack of trust and competition between ourselves. 

The Orange Growers' Association of California is a grand ex- 
ample of what can be done by co-operation ; the members all agree 
that only from within can this great organization be disrupted. 
Today they are in a position to demand and receive fair treatment 
at the hands of the railroads ; recent reductions in freight rates 
prove this. Their influence is felt as far as Washington, D. C, 
when there is talk of reductions in tariff on oranges and lemons. 

They are respected by Republicans and Democrats alike. Grow- 
ers of other fruits have enjoyed temporary or partial success only 
because they were not thoroughly organized ; there were just enough 
independent growers on the outside tlwt zvcrc not taken care of, to 
pull down the association price. 

Bee-keeping is becoming more of a specialty than ever before. 
!\Iore men are casting loose from other lines and "keeping more 
bees." In other words, there are not so many bee-keepers but more 
bee specialists. 

NATZONAI^ DESERVES SUPPORT. 

The National deserves credit for what it has done and deserves 
the support of every bee-man in the United States to become one 
of the largest business organizations in the Avorld. Bee-keepers have 
kept together in a social way remarkably well. Now is the time 
to get down to business — if you will pardon the expression — cut out 
"chewing the rag." Alarket your honey through the association, 
grade fair and square and according to standard, then the buyer 
cannot force the price down by putting your honey in a lower grade. 

The association must sell your honey if you are to receive the 
best price for it. The association must represent you, as you are a 



300 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

part of the association, otherwise we are no Ijetter off than now. 

The large buyers of honey made $-10' per ton on most of the 
California honey last year. The association would have to be 
very poorly managed not to save the greater part of this sum to the 
bee-keepers. 

FREIGHT RATES. 

Through co-operation, acting together, tlie Pecos Valley Bee- 
Keepers' Association received a reduction in freight rates. The 
Colorado Bee-Keepers' Association has successfully marketed its 
members' honey and outsiders' for the last ten years. vSee what is 
being done right in our own ranks. 

In California the rate on one ton of honey is just the same as 
on a carload ; here is room for improvement. Through co-operation 
the bee-keepers would be in a position to correct the many inequal- 
ities existing. They would receive the respect that other large bus- 
iness concerns receive, and would receive further consideration on 
account of their voting power. The waste in business methods in 
the United States is enormous, and especially in be«-keeping. Then 
the bee-keepers have to stand to lose for this waste; every penn}^ 
wasted means so much less for your honey. If Smith produces one 
ton of honey he should receive just as much per ton as Jones who 
produces ten tons. If Smith does not care to produce more than 
one ton that is his aft'air. Co-operation will not eliminate individ- 
ual effort, but it will give weak and strong alike a square deal. 
If you do not treat the small bee-keeper as your equal he v/ill be- 
come your superior by selling to your competitor. P'urther, it is 
not fair to ask the man who keeps a few bees (4 or 5 hives) to pay 
membership dues but he is more than willing to pay his proportion 
per ton for marketing his honey. It is to the interest of the big 
fellow to take care of this little fellow. 

Calabasas, Cal. 

[Let me call j'our attention to one sentence in the above article which is worthy 
being cut out and pasted up in our room as a motto. That sentence is, "If you do 
not treat the small bee-keeper as your equal, he will become your superior by 
selling to your competitor." 

Read this over and then think about it. How often extensive honey producers 
forget the importance of the small bee-keeper when considering their affairs. An 
old farmer, living near ray boyhood home, often made this remark, "While the big 
guns shoot the heaviest, the little ones scatter all over." What he meant was that 
we must not overlook the fact that a whole lot of apparently unimportant people 
have more influence, as a rule, than a few of the big ones we generally pick out 
as leaders. 

Co-operation ceases to be co-operation the minute we forget the smallest ones 
in the ranks. It is the duty of the many working together to throw the protection 
■of this united effort over the least important in the organization.] 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 301 



Published Monthly 
E. B. TYRRELL, Managing Editor. 
Office — 230 U'oodla?id Ave., Detroit, Michigan 
Associate Editors: 
E. D. TOWNSEND, Northstar, Mich. WESLEY FOSTER, Boulder, Colo. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post ofifice at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

DLscontinuanoes — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

Advertising rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



An Editorial Board of Review. 

The members of the National will welcome the information 
that Ave now have an Editorial Board. This broadens the scope of 
our journal, taking it from the ranks of a one-man publication. The 
editorial field can be much better covered by three editors than one, 
and it will give me, as your Secretary, a much better chance to 
push the business end of your association. I am glad to have the 
.support of two such good men as Mr. Townsend and Mr. Foster. 



Committee on Grading Rules. 

Acting on Director Townsend's suggestion I will take up the 
matter with the buyers regarding a committee to represent them 
at the next convention and hope to be able to announce their names 
in the September Review. This is getting the matter down to a 
"definite action and should accomplish some results. 



Gleanings Helps The Review in Its Fight for Uniform Grading 

Rules. 

I was pleased to note in July 15th Gleanings an editorial sug- 
•gesting the very plan of establishing a set of uniforni grading rules 
that I had proposed in the July Review. It is a peculiar coincidence 
that both editorials mentioned were written without the knowledge 
that the view taken was in accord with the other's views. I cer- 
taining appreciate having the assistance of CAcanwgs in this matter, 
.as I am still of the same belief that I had when I started the discus- 



302 THE BEE- KEEPERS' '" K\V 

sion and that is that a set of Uniform Grading Rules is possible, the 
opposition to the contrary notwithstanding-. 

Please note what Director Townsend has to say regarding this 
in this issue. 

Crop Report Blanks. 

A great many have not filled out and sent me their crop report 
blank published in the last Review, so I am inserting the blanks 
again in the August number wnth the request that every reader who 
has not already done so, fill out and send me the blank at once. 
This will give me an opportunity to give you a much better report 
of crop conditions in the September number. 



Producing, Preparing, Exhibiting, Judging Bee-Produce. 

Recently there came to my desk a little book of 168 pages, ex- 
clusive of the advertising pages, and bound in a heavy paper cover, 
bearing the above title. It was written by Wm. Herrod, F. E. S., 
Jr., Editor of the British Bee Journal, and Apiacultural Advisor to 
the Colonial office. I can without hesitation pronounce it a complete 
treatise on the subjects named, and it is well worth securing by any 
one at all interested in bee and honey exhibits. 

The book contains 15 chapters as follows : 1. Introduction. 2. 
The Judge. The Exhibitor. Duties of Secretaries and Stewards. 
3. Advice to Exhibitors. Advantages and Inducements of Exhibit- 
ing. 4. Points to be Observed and Methods of Judging. 5. Judging 
by Points. 6. Producing and Preparing Extracted Honey. 7. Pro- 
ducing and Preparing Comb Honey. 8. Producing and Preparing 
Wax. 9. Producing and Preparing By-Products with Recipes. 10. 
Observatory Hives, Appliances, Trophies, and Scientific Exhibits. 
11. Packing Exhibits. 12. Despatching Exhibits. 13. Showing as a 
Means of Disposing of Honey. 14. Rules, Regulations and Sched- 
ules. 15. Attractive and Educational Work. 

The large number of illustrations which the book contains makes 
the descriptive matter very clear by showing in picture what is told 
in print. As an illustration, a description is given, together with 
illustrations, showing how to produce special designs in comb honey, 
something which is found on many of our state premium lists, but 
which practically no bee-keeper knows how to produce. The price 
of the book is not given, but it can be purchased from the British 
Bee Journal, 23 Bedford St., Strand, W. C. 



How to Reach Those Who Don't Take Bee Journals. 

In Gleanings for July the loth, Mr. P. C. Chadwick, of Redlands, 
Cal., wonders how to reach the bee-keepers who don't take the 
bee journals. This is a problem that has been discussed by many 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 303 

in the past and is one of much importance to the bee-keeping 
industry. 

I believe that one of the best methods of reaching this class 
of producers has been overlooked and entirely ignored in the past. 
That method is through the institute work done by the state agri- 
cultural colleges. So far as I know Michigan has never had an 
institute worker in behalf of bee-keeping up to the present time. 
Every year she sends a special instruction train through the state, 
carrying exhibits as well as lecturers to talk to the farmers on 
different topics. ^ly trip with that train this year demonstrated to 
me that it was a splendid means of reaching the small bee-keeper 
and of emphasizing the importance of the honey bee to the farmer 
and business man. 

So I would suggest. Friend Chadwick, that to reach the man 
in California who does not take a bee journal, that you take this 
matter up with your state officials and arrange for a lecturer on 
bee-keeping in the institute work. In addition, don't forget your 
association of farmers' clubs, and if it becomes necessary I honestly 
believe that a man can at least pay expenses to get up a good 
lecture and travel from town to town giving lectures and demonstra- 
tions in bee-keeping. The thing to guard against in these talks is 
not to try to cover too much ground and also be sure that your 
hearers do not get the impression that bee-keeping is a royal road 
to wealth. In other words, don't attempt to influence every one 
to keep bees. 



The Honey Crop This Year. 

The crop report blanks, which were sent you with the July 
Review, have only partially been returned. In many cases it was 
too early for the sender to give an estimate. This report is not to 
be considered final, as a more definite report will be given in the 
September number, but so far as they have been sent in up to July 
30th, conditions are as follows : 

Throughout the eastern part of the United States, or the clover 
belt, the crop has been a great deel heavier than last year. This 
in spite of the heavy loss of bees last winter. Illinois, ^Michigan, 
Wisconsin, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York [Maryland, 
A^ermont, Xorth Carolina and Xew Jersey, have all had a heavy flow 
of honey. From present reports the crop in Michigan will be only 
about one-sixth more than last year, as the winter loss seemed 
exceptionally heavy in this state. Canada reports an increase over 
last year. In considering these reports we must not forget that 
they are from the better class of bee-keepers, and that undoubtedly 
a great deal more honey will be consumed in home markets, owing 
to the fact that there will be no competition from the small farmer 



304 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

bee-keeper, whose bees were practically wiped out last winter. 
Minnesota reports about the same amount of honey as she had 
last year. 

A different story, however, is told from the West. California and 
Oregon both report practically a failure. Colorado is yet to be 
heard from, as it was too early for their report. Idaho has about 
the same as last year, Utah a trifle more, and Montana considerably 
more. Iowa and Missouri both report heavy crops. From the 
South we find Alabama a failure, Arkansas one-half less and Texas 
at least one-sixth less. 

It must be understood that these figures are based on the crop 
secured last year, which in the East was practically a failure, so 
that while a good deal more clover honey is reported for this year, 
it would probably not be more than an average crop, taken one year 
with another. Then considering the fact that some of the western 
states report a failure, it would seem that those who have some 
honey to sell should realize an average price for the same, but 
little, if any, less than was received last year. 

With the honey reaching the highest price a year ago, con- 
sumption was cut off to a certain extent, but this was at the later 
part of the season, when the prices were raised above normal. 

I hope to be able to give you a more definite report next month, 
as all of the crop reports should be in by that time. 

I don't want any producer to get scared on reading the above 
and sell his honey at a low price. Either get a fair price now or 
wait until you get the September Review giving further reports. 



What Has the Harvest Been? 

This is a question that interests both the producer as well as 
the dealer in honey. The dealer, with his numerous ways of finding 
out, already knows long before the producer, who has been alto- 
gether too busy producing the crop to think much along the line 
of turning his product into cash. Now that the crop is upon the. 
hive at least, the producer begins to think "what has the harvest 
been?" and what about the price to ask for the crop that has taken 
him toward a year to produce, taking into consideration the getting 
his bees over the last hard winter, which was no small job, when a 
half of the bees in the northern states either died outright or were 
so reduced in numbers that they were of very little use as surplus 
honey gatherers during the season. Another point to be taken into 
consideration this year is, bees died much further south the last hard 
winter than usual. Almost the whole scope of the clover belt 
suffered this loss, so in considering the prospects of the extent of 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 305 

the clover crop of surplus honey at this time, it would be necessary 
to about double the product of those that did winter and get into 
shape for the harvest, to make this year's crop as large as a year 
ago, which was the smallest on record. 

It is true that very large yields of honey per colony have been 
harvested in some locations this season, but the number of colonies 
that were strong enough to gather a normal quantity of surplus 
honey this year were very few indeed. It is my opinion that the 
better grades of both comb and extracted honey for table use will 
be about the same as a year ago, and we are asking the same price 
for ours with the expectation of its selling rather better than a 
year ago, as the quality of Michigan honey is much better this year 
than last. 

The fact is, it has been several years since we have had such 
a normal flow of honey as this year, and the honey seems corre- 
spondingly better for this reason. What is true in Michigan is 
likely true all over the clover-producing region. What I have said 
about the quality of the clover honey is equally true of the 'Mich- 
igan raspberry and basswood. Rich, ripe, that exquisite flavor so 
much relished by the discriminating public is prevalent this year. 
This "quality" feature will surely go a long ways toward creating 
a demand for this year's crop of honey. The producer who sold 
his better grade of white extracted honey suitable for table use a 
year ago for less than 9^2 cents to 10 cents per pound, on track, 
can now take out his pencil and figure up his loss, for he surely 
lost the difference, aside from making it "just a little harder" for 
his brother bee-keeper to get the price for his honey. Comb honey 
should bring about twice that of extracted was the way we used 
to figure when we were producing comb honey. 

Brother, it is up to you. The situation is in your hands. You, 
the most of you at any rate, still have your crop of honey on hand, 
much of it still upon the hive. You can have the market price for 
your hard-earned product, or you can part with it at a cent or two 
below the market, the dealer pocketing the difference. Which will 
you do this year? Your selling below the market will not help 
the consumer one whit, for the dealer is wise enough to look out 
for number one, when once the honey is in his hands. Demand 
a good fair price for your product this year, brother. It's yours 
for the asking. 

The dealer is not your enemy, far from it ; really he is your 
very best friend, but he is human, and will buy at the best figure 
he can — it's natural, it is business. All one need do is to meet him 
half way. You have the opportunity this fall. 

E. D. TOWNSEND. 



306 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

Officers. Directors. 

George W. York, President. ... Sandpoint, Ida. E. D. Townsend, Chairman Remus, Mich. 

MoRLEY Pettit, Vice-Pres. . . Guelph, Ont., Can. J. M. Buchanan Franklin, Tenn. 

E. B. Tyrrell, Secretary Detroit, Mich. Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. 

230 Woodland Ave. J. E. Crane Middlebury, Vt. 

N. E. France, Treas. Gen. Mgr., Plattville, Wis. F. Wilco.x Mauston, Wis. 

(rational Branches and Their Secretaries. 

Arizona Honey Exchange New Jersey— E. G. Carr New Egypt, N. J. 

G. M. Frizzell, Tempe, Ariz. N. Michigan — Ira D. Bartlett 

Adirondack — H. E. Gray.. Fort Edwards, N.Y. East Jordan, Mich. 

Colorado— Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. Ohio — Prof. N. E. Shaw, Dept. of Agr 

Chicago-Northwestern— L. C. Dadant Columbus, Ohio 

Hamilton 111 Ontario — P. W. Hodgetts, Parliament Bldg., 

Idaho— R.' D." BradshavV. '.'.". '.'.".'.'. . . Notus, 'ida! ^ • • • • • • ' \Vr-\ Toronto, Ont., Can. 

Illinois— Jas. A. Stone. . . Rt. 4, Springfield, 111. Oregon— H. Wilson Corvallis, Ore. 

Iowa— C. L. Pinney Le Mars, Iowa Pecos Valley— Henry C. Barron 

Indiana— Walter Pouder, 859 Mass. Ave. . . Hagerman, New Mexico 

Indianapolis, Ind. Twin Falls — C. H. Stimson. .Twin Falls, Ida. 

Missouri — J. F. Diemer Liberty, Mo. Tennessee — J. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn. 

Michigan — E. B. Tyrrell, 230 Woodland N'ermont- P. E. Crane Middlebury, Vt. 

Ave., Detroit, Mich. Washington — J. B. Ramage 

Minnesota — C. E. Palmer, 1024 Miss. St.. Rt. 2, N. Yakima, Wash. 

St. Paul, Minn. Wisconsin — Gus Dittmer Augusta, Wis. 



An Editorial Board for The Review. 

By authority of Rule No. 20, the Board of Directors have 
appointed Mr. Wesley Foster and E. D. Townsend as Associate 
Editors of the Bee-Keepers' Review, to act until the delegate meet- 
ing in February, or until their successors shall be elected. They 
take up the reign of duty with the September, 1912, number. 

E. D. Townsend, Chainnan. 



Now for National Grading Rules. 

In the July Review, Editor Tyrrell suggests the advisability of 
having a committee appointed to meet at the next National meeting 
in February, to draw up a set of Uniform Grading Rules for Comb 
Honey. The scheme is to have the board of directors of the Na- 
tional select three experienced comb honey producers, who thor- 
oughly understand the grading of comb honey, to meet with three 
experienced comb honey dealers who understand the requirements 
of the market, and the six formulate a set of grading rules that it is 
hoped will be accepted as a uniform set by both the producer and 
dealer. 

As chairman of the Board of Directors, I promise the hearty 
support of the board in this matter, and that we will only be too 
willing to do our part and have our three of the committee on the 
ground at the next meeting of the National, in February, 1913. I 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 307 

would further suggest that three alternates also be appointed by- 
each of the parties. 

There is so little time bet^veen now and our February meeting', 
and so much to do in the line of discussion on this subject, I would 
suggest that the secretary of the National, Mr. Tyrrell, appoint three 
honey dealers of influence, the first one mentioned being chairman, 
as is customary, as a committee to take this matter up with the 
dealers, and determine who shall be their representatives. 

It will be unnecessary for me to say that the pages of the Re- 
view will be open for this discussion ; it is open, and has been for 
some time, as the readers know. 

At least one bee journal has offered its service in this matter, 
and it is to be hoped all the journals will lend a helping hand in the 
matter of uniform grading rules for comb honey. 

E. D. TowxsFND^ Chairman. 



Co-operative Bee-Keeping Among Farmers. 

It is a well-known fact that there are hundreds of farmers who 
are attempting to keep a few colonies of bees, giving them no care 
and securing but little, if any, surplus. These colonies are also a 
damage to the man who wishes to make bee-keeping a business, be- 
cause they are a source of spreading bee diseases in many cases. 
There are still other hundreds of farmers who would like to keep 
bees, but are afraid of the stings or have not the time or inclination 
to give them the proper attention. Again there are many bee-keepers 
who are anxious "to keep more bees,'" but who lack the means for 
doing this. 

Xo one will question the advantage of having bees in the neigh- 
borhood where fruits and seeds are grown. Many will question the 
advantage of having them scattered around a few colonies in a place 
in inefficient hands. 

What would prevent one, then, from starting a Co-operative 
Farmers' Apiary? Suppose you call a meeting of the farmers in 
your neighborhood at some central point, say in a public school- 
house. Talk to them regarding the advantages of the bee to the 
fruit and seed crops, the disadvantage of each farmer trying to han- 
dle a few colonies, and get as many interested as possible. You 
will no doubt find many who would like to keep bees, and then 
suggest that an apiary of fifty to a hundred colonies be formed in a 
central portion of the neighborhood. Let the farmers either con- 
tribute the bees or else furnish money to buy them. Figure out how 
much it would cost to establish an apiary including the bees, 
surplus receptacles, honey-house and extractor if they are used. 
Divide this total cost into as many parts as you will have hives of 
l)ees in the vara. Let each farmer take from one to not more than 



308 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

five parts or shares. If a farmer wishes to turn in bees as his share, 
have a certain fixed price for those bees, but do not pay an exorbi- 
tant price for them. 

This yard is then to be placed in charge of a competent bee- 
keeper on shares, the bee-keeper getting one-half and the farmers 
the other half of the crop produced. The farmers' part will be 
divided into as many divisions as there are colonies of bees and each 
one given his or her proportionate share. If one-half of the bees 
should die the coming winter, proper increase would be made and 
the total honey crop would again be divided into the same number 
of equal shares as there were colonies in the yard when the apiary 
was first established. 

It is no more than fair for me to say that I don't know of the 
above plan ever being put in operation, but I can see no reason why 
it could not be made to work. There will be some details to work 
out, and if any one desires to undertake it I will be glad to corre- 
spond with them and oft'er any other suggestions which may occur. 
The benefit of the plan would be that you would still give the 
farmer a chance to keep bees, but they would be kept in a scientific 
manner in charge of a competent person. 



The Washington Branch Passes a Resolution of National Interest. 

The following resolution was read at a well-attended meeting of 
the Washington State Bee-Keepers' Association, held at Wapato, 
Washington, May 25, 1912, and, after a general discussion, was put 
to a vote and carried unanimouslv. 

Whereas, Foul Brood, an infectious disease of the honey bee in 
its larval state, has been spreading at an alarming rate during the 
past six or seven years, and, 

Whereas, The essential cause, a bacillus, or microorganism, has 
to be carried from one locality to another by some agent to which it 
attaches itself, chief of which has been the extensive mailing of 
queen bees and their attendants, and, 

Whereas, Queen breeders without special training do not under- 
stand the details of sterilizing objects, such as the queen cages, their 
hands, implements, clothing, etc., and as boiling the honey used in 
the mailing cages without other precautions would be a false safe- 
guard and furnish no assurance of safety to the purchaser and calcu- 
lated to do mischief because it is now indorsed and sanctioned by a 
ruling of the post office department, and. 

Whereas, Honey properly sterilized by boiling would be taken 
by unsterilized hands using an unsterilized spoon or other instru- 
ment, put into an unsterilized cage, a queen and her attendants 
without any knowledge as to condition is put into the cage and by 
the present ruling is accredited as safe to the purchaser; and, 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 309 

irJicrcas, In our economic conditions the general welfare of the 
bee-keeping industry is -vastly of more importance than is the rear- 
ing of queens. 

.VoTc. therefore, be if Resolved, That we, the ^^'a^hing•ton State 
Bee-Keepers' Association, in convention assembled, respectfully peti- 
tion the post office department at ^^'ashington that queen breeders 
with foul brood in their yard or among bees in their charge, be de- 
nied the use of the mails for the transmission of queen bees or other 
objects or appliances intended for use by bee-keepers, and we would 
further respectfully petition that a ruling embodying the following 
features be adopted, viz : that queen breeders furnish the local post- 
master with a certificate from a properly authorized bee inspector, 
stating that all bees in their charge are free from foul brood or, when 
no inspector is available, they are to take an oath before a notarv or 
other person authorized to take acknowledgments, that thev do not 
have foul brood in their yards, or arhong bees in their charge, and 
that the honey used in their mailing cages is a product of their own 
apiary, and, further, that they are not personally, i.e., with their own 
hands, bottling or otherwise handling honey bought from outside 
localities. 

The certificate of inspection or affidavit to be renewed every ten 
days during the mailing season of queens, a copy to be furnished the 
local postmaster and one to be sent to the purchaser. 

And further be it Resolved. To make our position as public as 
possible in order to warn the queen buying bee-keeper. Also that a 
copy of this resolution be mailed to Postmaster-General Hitchcock, 
Dr. E. F. Phillips, of the Bureau of Entomology, \\'ashington. D. C, 
and Secretary AA'illson, of the Agricultural Department, and the vari- 
ous bee journals and bee-keepers' associations. 

A. E. BuRDiCK. President. 
J. B. Ram AGE, Seeretarx. 



Some Proposed Changes of the Constitution. 

The postal regulations require that a publisher of a periodical 
keep a paid-up subscription list. That is, they require of us, as pub- 
lishers of the RFA'IE^^■, that we charge say one dollar per annum. Xo 
matter how bad we would like to charge the dollar for a year's dues 
in the National, and throw in the Review, we cannot do it without 
loosing the privilege of the low second-class mail rates. 

As far as I know there is nothing to hinder us from charging a 
subscription price of a dollar fi:)r the Review, and the oOc local dues 
be considered as a paid-up membership in the National. This is 
likely what we will have to do until the meeting of the delegates 
next February, when we will expect further instructions. 



310 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

Article IV., Section 3, of the National Constitntion, reads as 
follows : "Membership in the National Association will begin Janu- 
ary 1st each year. Those joining previous to September 1st will be 
credited paid to January 1st following. Those joining after Septem- 
ber 1st will be credited paid one year from January 1st following." 

Since the adoption of our Constitution last year, we have ac- 
quired a periodical that must be taken into consideration. It looks 
to me as if Section 3, Article IV, of the Constitution would need to 
be changed to meet the new requirements. We will suppose a case: 
Air. Goodbeekeeper sends in his $1.50^ under date of July 1st. He is 
given credit to a year's subscription to the Review for the dollar, 
and the 50c pays his annual dues m his local association. He gets 
the Review for a 3'ear, and a membership in the National for six 
months. 

It seems to me under the new arrangements it would be much 
better were the membership to begin at the time of joining the asso- 
ciation, and continue one year from that date. 

Then there is a considerable number in favor of separating the 
local fee from the National fee. It never seemed fair to me to 
charge a member the local fee, when he is located where no local 
branch of the National has been organized. Then there is the 
amount necessary to provide to carry on each individual local branch. 
This amount may vary considerably, some getting along with as 
small an amount as 25c per annum, while other branches would re- 
quire as much as a dollar per annum. Each branch should be 
allowed to name the amount of their annual dues to suit their re- 
spective requirements, would be my idea along this line. 

A constitution should be so formulated that it will cause no 
hardship to either the National Association or its branches. Our 
present constitution is not so arranged, and I would call upon the 
members to help us formulate a constitution, or rather to correct a 
portion of the one we already have, to conform to the present needs. 

According to our constitution, any changes made in the consti- 
tution at the February meeting of the delegates, must be formulated 
00 days before that meeting. It will be seen that the time is now 
ripe for discussion along this line of change in constitution at the 
next delegate meeting. What is your idea, members? 

E. D. TowNSEND, Chairman. 



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1714 Exposition Ave., Denver, Colo. 551 Woodward Ave., DETROIT, MICH^. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



311 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 



'rn 




NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



BOSTON. — Last season's crop of honey is 
all closed out and fancy new white comb we 
expect to sell here at 20 cents per lb., and we 
want the first that can be obtained for our best 
trade. Communications in regard to honey is 
solicited. White extracted, 10 to lie per lb.; 
wax, 30c. 

June 25. BLAKE-LEE CO. 



TOLEDO— Replying to your letter of July 
29th, beg to advise that there is little doing in 
the honey business at the present time, very 
little old honey left, and no new coming in, 
and so far no prices have been made, every 
one waiting to see how the new crop is going 
to turn out. Fancy New Comb Honey would 
bring in a retail way 17 to 18c per lb.; No. 1, 
16 to 17c per lb.; extracted white clover, 8^ 
to 10c per lb., depending on color, quality, etc. 
Beeswax is selling at from 32 to 35c. The 
above are our selling prices, and not what 
we are paying. 

July 30. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 



KANSAS- CITY — New comb honey arriv- 
ing on the market. No. 1 white selling at 
$3.50 per case of ■24 sections, last year's ex- 
tracted selling at 7c and 7^c for amber, 8c 
and Syic for white. Beeswax at 25c and 28c 
a pound. 

C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 

July 15. 

CINCINNATI— There is still some old 
comb honey in the market, and with very lit- 
tle demand. New comb honey has not yet 
arrived, and price will be lower than last 
^e^son, ?s there is a good crop in general. 
^V'ater white extracted honey in 60 pound cans 
is selling from 9 to 9'/4 cents according to 
quantity. Light amber in barrels from 6^-2 to 
Tyi cents, in cans from 8 to SYz cents. Bees- 
wax is selling at $33.00 per hundred. The 
above are our selling prices, not what we are 
paying. C. H. W. WEBER & CO.. 

July 18. 2146-2147 Central Ave. 



CINCINNATI — At this writing we have re- 
ceived several shipments of new Comb Honey. 
However, owing to the heavy crop reported 
everywhere, also noting that several cities 



have unsold Comb Honey from last year, the 
demand is not up to our expectations by far. 
For this reason, conditions must be looked 
into, and a range of prices is necessary in 
order to open up the season and enliven the 
buyers. 

The little comb honey that is moving we 
are selling at 13 to 16 cents a lb.; and fancy 
extracted honey at Syic a lb. to 10c, accord- 
ing to the quality and quantity purchased. 
Amber honey in barrels we are selling at 
from eyic to 7^c a lb. The above are selling 
prices. 

For strictly choice, bright yellow beeswax, 
we are paying 28c a lb. in cash or 30c a lb. in 
trade. THE FRED W. MUTH CO., 

"The Busy Bee Men." 
51 Walnut St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

July 15. 



DENVER, COL.— Old crop comb honey all 
sold. We expect the first of the new crop by 
the middle of July if weather conditions are 
favorable. We have a good stock of very fine 
extracted honey which we are quoting in a 
jobbing way at 9c for strictly white, 8c for 
light amber, 6^ to 7 '/4c for strained. We 
pay 26c in cash and 28c in trade per lb. for 
clean yellow beeswax delivered at Denver. 
Yours verv truly, 
THE COLORADO HONEY 
PRODUCERS' ASSN. 
June 25. F. Rauchfuss, Manager. 



NEW YORK. — Nothing new in comb honey; 
small shipments of new crop are coming in 
from the South and are selling at from 13c to 
16c according to quality. Extracted honey. — • 
Arrivals of new crop from the South are now 
coming in quite freely, as well as from the 
West Indies. Prices are rather unsettled as 
yet, ranging all the way from 70c to 90c per 
gallon, according to quality. Reports from 
California are rather conflicting, some of them 
estimating this year's crop at 500 cars, while 
others claim a very short crop. No offerings 
have been made as yet that we know of, and 
no prices established. Beeswax steady at from 
30c to 31c. 

June 24. HILDRETH & SEGELKEN. 



312 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



CHICAGO— The trade in honey during 
the past week has been of a very limited char- 
acter. A No. 1 to fancy comb is unobtainable 
and very little that will pass as No. 1 appears 
on sale. The prices for that are ranging from 
15 to 16c. Extracted has not been selling in 
quantity lots and the prices for it range nom- 
inally the same as for some time past, being 
from 8c to 9c for the white, and 7 to 8c for 
the various kinds of amber. Beeswax has been 
in fair supply and brings from 30 to 32c per 
lb. according to color and cleanliness. 

Yours truly, 
May 20. R. A. BURNETT & CO. 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge mill be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 



BEES AND QUEENS. 



Golden Itali.\n Queens, Nuclei, and full 
colonies. See price-list in May Review, page 
197. Isaac F. Tillinghast, Factoryville, Pa. 



A Limited Number of Leather Colored Ital- 
ian Queens for Sale. Warranted purely mated, 
$1..50. Geo. B. Howe, Black River, N. Y. 

Colonies of Italian Bees in L. hives, 10- 
fr., full of stores — any time. Jos. Wallrath, 
Antioch, Cal. 



NuT.MEG Italian Queens, after June 1, $1.00. 
Circular. A. W. Yates, 3 Chapman St., Hart- 
ford. Ct. 



Front Line Italian Oueens by return mail 
at 75c each, 6, $4.25; 12, $8.00; 25 and up, 
60c each. J. B. Hollopeter, Panty, Pa. 

For Sale — Untested queens Howe strain, 
mated to select drones. No other bees in 
mating distance. $1.00 each, 6 for $5.00, $9.00 
per doz. D. G. Little, Hartley, Iowa. 

Hardy Northern Grown Queens of Moore's 
strain of Italians, ready for prompt shipment 
untested, $1.00; 6 for $5.00; 12 for $9.00. 
Less for lots of 50 or more. P. B. Ramer, 
Harmony, Minn. 

Italian Queens. — Three band strain only. 
Tested $1.00 each; Untested $0.75; $7.00 per 
dozen. No disease. Send for price list. 

J. W. K. Shaw & Co., Loreauville, La. 

Choice Italian Queens, delivery beginning 
April 15. Untested, 75 cts. ; tested, $1.00. Ten 
years' experience in queen-rearing. Send your 
orders now. F. Hughes, Gillett, Ark. 

Golden Italian Queens — Untested, war- 
ranted $1.00 each; six for $4.50; twelve for 
$8.00. Good reports where tried for Black 
brood. J. B. Case, Port Orange, Fla. 



Quirin's famous improved Italian queens, 
nuclei, colonies, and bees by the pound, ready 
in Islzy. Our stock is northern-bred and 
hardy; five yards wintered on summer stands 
in 1908 and 1909 without a single loss. For 
prices, send for circular. Quirin-the-Queen- 
Breeder, Bellevue, O. 

Vermont Queens and Bees — Three-banded 
Italian-Howe strain crossed with best honey 
gatherers I ever owned. $1.00, untested; 6 for 
$5.00; nuclei, $1.00 per frame. Add price of 
queen. H. William Scott, Barre, Vermont. 



Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 

Queens. — Mott's strain of Italians and Car- 
niolans. Bees by pound, nuclei. Ten-page list 
free. Plans for Introducing Queens, 15 cts.; 
How to Increase, 15 cts.; both, 25 cts. E. E. 
MoTT, Glenwood, Mich. 

Italian and Carnolan Queens — Nucleus and 
full colonies; bees by the pound; apiaries in- 
spected for brood diseases; bee supplies; write 
for circular. Frank M. Keith, 83J/2 Florence 
St., Worcester, Mass. 

Our Golden Queens produce beautiful 
golden bees, that are great honey gatherers and 
very gentle, and our leather colored will please 
you. (Government inspection). C. W. 
Phelps & Son, 3 Wilcox St., Binghampton, 
N. Y. 

For Sale. — Moore's strain and golden Italian 
queens, untested, $1.00; six, $5.00; twelve, $9.00. 
Carniolan, Banat, and Caucasian queens, select, 
$1.25; six, $6.00; twelve, $10.00. Tested, any 
kind, $1.50; six, $8.00. Choice breeders, $3.00. 
Circular free. W. H. Rails, Orange, Cal. 

Carniolan Queens. — Bred from best im- 
ported stock. Many colonies can be manip- 
ulated without the use of smoke or veil. Un- 
tested, one for $.75, six for $4.50, twelve for 
$8.00. Tested, one for $1.00, six for $5.00, 
twelve for $10.00. William Kerman, Dushore, 
Pa., R. D. 2. 

Bees and Queens — Italian Queens at 75c, 
$8.00 a dozen; tested $1.00, $10.00 a dozen; 
Cyprians, Carniolians, Caucasians or Banats at 
$1.00, tested $1.25; 2-5 gal. cans, 58c; 1 ' lb. 
bottles, $3.75 per gross; bees, supplies and 
honey. Walter C. Morris, 74 Cortlandt St., 
New York City. 

Golden Queens. — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, golden 
to tip queens, that should produce golden to tip 
workers, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also nuclei 
and full colonies. Send for circular and price 
list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., Phila- 
delphia, Penna. 

If you wish the best of untested three- 
banded Italian queens send us your orders — 
75 cents each, $8.00 per dozen. Safe arrival 
and satisfaction. No order too small nor too 
large to receive our prompt attention. The 
Golden Rule Bee Co., Rt. 1, Box 103, River- 
side, Cal. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



313 



Golden and 3-Banded Italians. — Tested, $1 
each. 3 queens $2.75; 6 or more, 85c each. 
Untested, 75c each; 3 queens, $2; 6 or more, 
65c each. Bees per pound, $1. Nuclei, per 
frame, $1.25. (No disease here.) C. B. 
Bankston, Buffalo, Texas. 

Queens and Half Pound Packages — A 
strain of 3-banded Italian honey gatherers 
now ready for you. None better, none cheap- 
er. Untested Italian queens 50c each. Half 
pound bees with untested queen, $1.75. Safe 
arrival and satisfaction guaranteed. D. S. 
Jenkins writes: "I got more bees in half 
pound packages from you than out of one 
pound packages from others and your queens 
would be laying next morning after released 
and the other fellows' queens it would take 
some of them 4 days to commence. You 
treated me right." W. D. Achord, Fitzpat- 
rick, Ala. 



HONE'S- AND WAZ. 



Selling Out. — Danzenbaker hives and su- 
pers, new and second hand; also bees in either 
dovetailed or Danzenbaker hives. 8-frame 
dovetailed hives, including Italian queen and 
bees $4.00 each. lO-frame Danzenbaker or 
dovetailed hives, including Italian queen and 
bees, $5.00 each. Reason, other large interests 
consume my time. R. B. Chipman, Clifton 
Heights, Del. Co., Pa. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
VVrite for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 

For Sale. — New 60-lb. cans, two in a case, 
lots of 10 cases, 60c each; 25 cases, 59c each. 
50 cases 58c each, 100 cases 57c each, F. 
O. B. factory in O. or 111. Quotations fur- 
nished on anything in cans; give quantity 
wanted. Large contracts enable us to make 
low prices. A. G. Woodman Co., Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 



I WANT comb honey, white or light amber, 
at once. O. N. Baldwin, Baxter Springs, 
Kansas. 



Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted — Glassed comb and clover extract- 
ed honey and beeswax. John O. Buseman, 
2828 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Extracted Hoxey of the finest quality — • 
thick well ripened, flavor simply delicious. 
White clover and sweet clover blend. Price 
9c per pound in bright new 60 lb. cans. Sam- 
ple free. J. P. Moore, Morgan, Ky. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. Hildreth & Segelken, 2G5 Greenwich 
St., New York. 



MISCEIiI^ANEOTrS. 

Rubber Stamps made to order. Breeder of 
Leghorns, W. Wyandotts. Jeff Macomber, 
Gaylord, Mich. 

Wanted — Second-hand honey extractor. Must 
be cheap. Bee-Keeper, 1831 Fremont Ave., 
Dubuque, Iowa. 

In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton, Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 

Aluminum Hive Numbers (I'/^-in. high) 2c 
each Fig. 50 or more lj4c. Postpaid, incl. 
brass nails. Henry Benke, Pleasantville Sta., 
N. Y. 

For Sale. — Second hand S-frame hives, sec- 
tions, shipping cases, 60-Ib. cans, brood combs, 
foundation and wax, cheap. O. N. Baldwin, 
Baxter Springs, Kansas. 

Special Offers in Bee Literature, etc. 
Good locations for bees in new and unoccu- 
pied territory. Send for free circular. 
George W. York, Sandpoint, Idaho. 



REAIi ESTATE. 



For Rent. — 160-acre ranch with 35 stands of 
bees. 25 head of horses, and 10 milk cows. 
All fenced, good water and near school. James 
J. Cook, Real Estate, Whiterocks, Utah. 



VOVImTBTST. 



Pigeons! Pigeons!— Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
our specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Real Bargains — In stock 2-lb. pullets, chicks, 
eggs; heavy laying barred rocVs, S. C. R. I. 
Reds, S. C. White Leghorns, Pekin Ducks; the 
kind we all want; don't go on a strike all 
winter; catalog free. Crystal Spring Farm, 
Rt. 2, Lititz, Pa. 

Eggs— From Houdans, Buff P. Rocks, White 
Wvandottes, Buff and Black Orpingtons, Buff 
Leghorns, R. C. B. Leghorns. R. I. Reds; eggs 
$1.50 per 15, $2.75 per 30, $4.00 per 45; 
Bronze Turkeys' eggs, $2.50 per 11, $4.50 per 
22. Address A. F. Firestone, Broadwell, 
Ohio, Athens Co. 



BEE-KEEPERS 

Look up your .stock at once and send 
me a list of the supplies you need. I 
have a large stock to draw from to 
handle your orders for Hives, Sections, 
Comb Foundation, etc.; standard goods 
with latest improvements fresh from 
the factory at factory schedule of 
prices. I have a general line of Boot's 
Goods constantly on hand. My facili- 
ties for serving you are unequalled. 

Beeswax taken in exchange for sup- 
plies or cash. 

Italian Bees and Queens 
Be sure you liave my 1912 Catalog of 

Bees. Queens and Supplies. 
EABi; M. NICHOI.S, I.yonsvUle, Mass. 



314 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. PORTER BEE ESCAPE 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 



Honey, Beeswax, 3Iaple Sugar and 
Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 




THE 



SAVES 

SWARTHMORE APIARIES TIME HONEY MONEY 

The late E. L. Pratt's Celebrated Gentle 

GOLDEN ALL OVER QUEENS ''^ ^''^'" '"'"' •"'^- '" °^"'^"- 

REDIGREED Manufactured only by 

PENN G. SNYDER, State Apiary Inspector ""' * ^^ ""■ ^^'''^^^' Lewisto.vn, 1,1. 

SWARTHMORE. PA. 



SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufaduring Sedtions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 

CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 



"Grig-gs Saves you Freight." 

TOLEDO 

For me! Is every bee-man's guide when 
he wishes goods quick. 

Big stock Root's goods ready to ship 
same day order is received. 

Wholesale prices on Chick Feed, Beef 
Scrap, Grit, Shells, etc. 

Honey and Beeswax wanted. 

Catalogue Free. 

S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 

26 N. Erie St. 



PROTECTION HIVE 

The best and lowest priced double wall hive on the market. This hive has Jg mate- 
rial in the outer wall, and is not cheaply constructed of Jg material as some other hives 
on the market. Packing or dead air spaced as you prefer. Remember winter is approach- 
ing. Get your bees into comfortable quarters before it is here. Send for a catalogue. 

A. G. WOODMAN CO.. Grand Rapids, Mich. 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 



Power 



SAWS 



in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

y^.' W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 

384 Ruby Street, Rockford, Illinois. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



315 



RUSH orders for 

"falcon'' 

BEE SUPPLIES 



5 lb. 
50 lb. 

5 lb. 
50 lb. 



Quick price-list. 

1000 Beeway sections $5.50, 5M, $23.75 
Plain sections 25c per M less. 

per lb. 
light section foundation. . .64c 
light section foundation. . .59c 
Medium brood foundation 57c 
Medium brood foundation 52c 
100 Hoffman brood frames $3.00. 
10 No. 14 1-story Dtd. Hives, Cover, 
10 No. 14 1-story Dtd. Hives, cover, 
bottom, body and frames, 8- 
frame $13.50, 10-frame $15.00. 
Dovetailed supers with inside fix- 
tures but no sections or starters, 8- 
frame, 5, $2.50; 10, $4.80; 10-frame, 
5, $2.75; 10, $5.30. 

Condensed Rush Order directions, 
sections and supers — Give dimensions 
of sections. Hives and supers, state 
whether 8-frame or 10-frame. 

Order any article not mentioned, 
send money and we will even up with 
foundation. The best price will be 
given for every article with the "FAL- 
CON" guarantee of satisfaction. 

W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

Where the good bee-htves come from. 
Factory, Falconer, N. Y. 



WANTED 



Extracted Honey 



I buy directly from the beekeepers 
and sell it directly to consumers, and 
am therefore always in a position to 
pay you the best price for your honey. 

It will therefore pay you before you 
sell your crop to send me samples of 
the different grades of honey you have 
and the amount you have of each kind 
and how put up, and quote me the 
price you ask for each kind delivered 
in Preston. I pay cash on arrival of 
goods. 



M. V. FACEY 

FBESTON, FII.I.MOBZ: CO., 

IVUNN. 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
country, and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
young basswood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 



Michigan Honey 



Wanted 



We buy heavily every year. 
Have dealt with a good many 
members of the Michigan As- 
sociation. Cash paid. Write us 
at once, stating what you have, 
how put up, and price. 



F.P.Reynolds&Co. 

Woodbridge and Griswold Sts., 
DETROIT, MICH. 



316 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



WANTED 

NEW CROP 

HONEY 



Both Comb and 
Extracted 

Are you looking for a market? New 
York is as good as any. We handle on 
commission and buy outright. Write 
us before disposing of your honey. 



Hildreth & Segelken 

235--«7 Green^^ioli St. 
XEW YORK CITY, N. Y". 



W. H. Laws 

will be ready to take care of your queen 
orders, whether large or small, the coming 
season. Twenty-five years of careful breed- 
ing brings Laws' queens above the usual 
standard; better let us book your orders 
now. 

Tested queens in March; untested, after 
April 1st. About 50 first-class breeding- 
queens ready at any date. 

Prices: Tested, $1.25; 5 for $5.00; Breed- 
ers, each $5.00. Address 

AV. H. La^vs, Beeville, Texas. 



Why Not Have a Good Light? Here It Is! 

Bright, Powftrlul, Economical. 
Odorless, Smokeless. Every one 
guaranteed. The Lamp to READ, 
WRITE and WORK by. Indis- 
pensable in j'our home. If your 
dealer hasn't got them, send his 
name and address and your name 
and address and we will mail as 
many as you want at 25c each. 
AGEXT.S WANTED EVERY- 

THE STEEL MANTLE LIGHT CO. 

•<:<•? Huron St.. 'loledo. O 

ADVERTISE YOUR HONEY NOW! 




FOR SALE 



IT 



Fancy and No. 1 white clover and 
basswood comb honey in 4^4x1 V2 plain 
sections, put up in no-drip shipping 
:ases, holding 24 or 28 sections per case, 
eight cases per carrier at ISc per sec- 
tion by the carrier of S cases or more. 

Also finest quality of white clover 
and basswood blend extracted honey, 
put up in new 60 lb. square cans at 
10c per lb. by case of two cans or 
more. This honey is the finest I have 
ever produced. 

No. 25, 4-frame Cowan Extractor in 
good repair for $16.00. 



I _L 



U 



L. S. GRIGGS 

711 Avon St., FLINT, MICH. 



Raspberry 
Honey... 



Our crop of raspberry honey this year 
is very fine. It is the best in quality 
I ever saw. It was all left on the 
hives until it was all thoroughly sealed 
and ripened by the bees. It is thick, 
rich and delicious. It is put up in 
new GO lb. tin cans. Price $6.00 per 
can. A large sized sample by mail for 
10 cents. 



ELMER HUTCHINSON, 
Pioneer, Mich. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



317 



QUEENS OF 

MOORE'S STRAIN 

OF ITALIANS 

PRODUCE WORKERS 

That fill the supers quick 
With honey nice and thick. 



They have won a world-wide rep- 
utation for honey-gathering, hard- 
iness, gentleness, etc. 

Untested queens, ?1.00; six, 
$5.00; 12, $9.00. 

Select untested, $1.25; six, $6.00 
12. $11.00. 

Safe arrival and satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

Circular free. 



J. P. MOORE 

Queen Breeder, 
Route 1, Morgan, Ky. 



This is the only place 
in Indiana where you 
can get Lewis Beeware, 
Dadant's Foundation, 
Bingham Smokers, and 
Prompt Shipment. 

Indianapolis is tlie greatest inland 
railroad center in the world, both steam 
and interurban. This helps us to give 
better service in receiving and shipping 
to all points. Orders are shipped same 
day received and no order is too small 
to receive prompt attention. 

Wanted: Comb and Extracted Honey, 
Beeswax. Catalog free. 



The C. M. Scott Co. 

1004 E. Wasliington St., 
INSIANAPOIiIS, INDIANA. 



Bee-Keepers 



I will be in the market for 
large quantities of 

(clover and Dasswood 



//. 



oney 



Again serve your own interests. 

Send me a sample and get my 

offer before you make a 

mistake. 



H. C Ahlers 

West Bend, Wis. 



SATISFACTORY 

RESULTS 

Will be obtained by using MANU- 
FACTURED COMB FOUNDATION, 
which embodies PURITY, TOUGH- 
NESS, TRANSPARENCY, COLOR and 
the PURE BEES WAX ODOR of the 
NATURAL COMB as made by the 
HONEY BEE. 

SUCH IS THE 

DITTMER PROCESS 
COMB FOUNDATION 

Send for Samples. 

All other Bee Keepers' Supplies at 
prices you will appreciate. We will be 
pleased to send you our 1912 Catalog, 
for the asking. 



Gus Dittmer Co, 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



318 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




"If gooHs are wanted quick, send to Pouder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
My equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 

"^'^ PAPER HONEY JARS (Sample Mailed Free) 
For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I tjuy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis.lnd. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 



E. D. TOWNSEND & SONS, 

NORTHSTAR, MICH, (notice change in address) 

Offer for sale their 1912 crop of white extracted honey in new 60 lb. net tin cans. 
It consists of wild red rasplaerry from our Charlevoix Co. bee-yards, clover and 
basswood honey blended in the extractor from our yards here at home. Our crop 
this year on account of lack of bees to gather it will not be large, but of 
very superior quality. Is without a doubt the iinest we eyer produced in nearly 
40 years with the bees. My son, Delbert, who has charge of our bees in the 
raspberry district, writes of this season's honey as follows : "White, rich, ripe, 
ropy, never had such heavy bodied honey before; tank left standing over night 
full of this honey is so heavy body that the particles of comb it contains will not 
rise to the top." Mighty good honey, that! Just the kind for the dealer to buy 
and blend in with his "ordinary" kind, to improve the quality. We are offering 
either kind at the following prices on board the cars near the producing point : 
One can of 60 lb. net at 11 cents per pound; 2 to 19 inclusive at 10 cents per 
pound; 20 cans or more, to reduce stock, at 9^2 cents per pound. This latter price 
will be withdrawn as soon as the stock is somewhat reduced. Sample free if you 
will enclose 4 cents to pay the postage. 

E. D. TOWNSEND & SONS, New address. Northstar, Mich. 



Why Not REAR Your Own QUEENS? 



Doolittie's "Scientific Queen-Rearing" and the 
American Bee Journal for 1912 — Both for Only 



$1.00 




Address 

AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL, 



Kvery Bee-keeper Should Have Both Book and 
Bee-Papef. 

DOOLITTLE'S "Scientific Queen-Rearing" book 
contains 126 pages, and is bound in leatherette 
with round corners. It tells in the clearest 
way possible just how the famous queen-breeder, 
Mr. G. M. Doolittle, rears the best of queen-bees 
in perfect accord with Nature's way. It is for 
both amateur and veteran in bee-lieeping. As all 
know, Mr. Doolittle has spent some 40 years in 
rearirig queens and producing honey. He has no 
superior as a queen-breeder. You can learn to rear 
fine queens by following his directions. Read up 
now before the bee season is here. 

You w^ill not regret having this book, which also 
gives his management of the bees for the produc- 
tion of honey. 

The book, and the American Bee Journal for 
1912, for only $1.00, is certainly a big bargain for 
you. Send the $1.00 now, and we will begin your 
subscription with January 1, 1912, and mail you 
this book. Sample copy of the Bee Journal free. 




HAMILTON, ILL. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 319 



^ 



Fill out this Crop Report Blank at once, and send 
it to The National Bee -Keepers' Association, 
230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 



At the January meeting the Board of Directors passed a resolution that 
the Secretary should get a crop report from every member of the National 
Association, and from it compile a report to be sent to every member, giving 
him the facts concerning the honey crop, as well as some information con- 
cerning the markets. Do not hesitate to report the facts promptly and 
honestly, as they will be used for your good. 



Name 

Address 

Number colonies, spring count? Will you have 

comb honey for sale? How put up? 

From what source gathered ? 

Estimated amount? Will you have extracted honey for sale? 

How put up? 

From what source gathered ? 

Estimated amount? Have you bees for sale? 

How many colonies? Do you wish to buy bees? 

When ? How many colonies ? 

Have you beeswax for sale? How many pounds? 

How many colonies did you have in the spring of 1911? 

How many spring of 1912? How many pounds of 

honey did you produce in 1911? How many in 1912? 

All subscribers to the Review, as well as all members to the "National," are asked to 
fill out and send in this report. It will be the only way that we can give you definite 
facts concerning the honey crop, and thus arm you with the information you must have to 
be able to intelligently set a price upon your honey crop this year. 

Yours truly, 

E. B. TVBRZ:i.i:., Secretary. 



320 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



This Can 'or 20 ets., in Crates of 50. 

F.O.B. Detroit. 




NOTE THE 
INNER SEAL 



Fc ihis same can, packed two in 
a box, the price is 60c per box. 
Note the paneled sides, the inner 
seal, and remember the tin is heavy. 
Size of can, 9^ square by 13^8 
inches high, with 1 % inch cork 
Hned, inner seal, screw cap. 



This Pail for 6% cfs., in Crates of 100. 

F.O.B. Detroit 



A friction top pail. Put in the 
honey, push down the cover, and you 
have no leakage. Size of pail, 6^8 
inches in diameter by 7 inches high. 
Holds 10 lbs. Honey 




Write for descriptive circular giving 
full particulars, prices, and freight 
rates, to 

The National Bee-Keepers' Association 

230 Wccdland Ave., Detroit, Mich. 




I No. 



No. 51 



No. 52 



No. 53 



Glass Packages 

For Honey. 

According to instructions given by the Board of Directors, we have 
made arrangements with one of the largest glass manufacturers to fur- 
nish our members with glass packages this year. Only four sizes were 
selected, and it is hoped that as large orders will be sent in as possible, 
for what we do this year will determine whether we can get even better 
arrangements next year. On car lots either tor these lour sizes or for 
any special size, write and we will see if we can get you a still closer 
price. 

No. 50 Jar holds one pound of honey. Has tin screw cap. Packed 2 
dozen in a corrugated paper case, at 85c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. 

No. 51 Jar holds % of a pound of honey. Tin screw cap. Packed 2 
dozen in a corrugated paper case, at G5c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. 

No. 52 Jellie, holds i/^ pound of honey. Tin cap. Packed 2 dozen In 
a corrugated paper case, at 40c per case. Packed 4 dozen in a case 
at 70c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. Per barrel, 13c per dozen, plus 
50c for the barrel. 

No. 53 Squat Jellie, holds >^ pound honey. Tin cap. Packed only in 
cases holding 6 dozen, at 90c per case, or by the barrel at 13c per 
dozen, plus 50c for the barrel, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. A barrel holds 
from 20 to 25 dozen jellies. 

Be sure and send in your orders in plenty of time, sending cash with 
the same. These prices for members and subscribers only. 

THE NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS* ASSOCIATION, 



230 Woodland Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 



V. 



.J 




ROOT'S 

beekeepers 
Supplies 




You may have a catalog of supplies; but if you haven't ours for 1912 you have missed 
something really worth while, and should get one at once. It is the largest and most complete 
ever published — more than a mere price list of siippHes — a book that every beekeeper can read 
with pleasure and profit. Beginners will find answers to many perplexing questions, and ad- 
vanced beekeepers timely suggestions that will save them money. Old customers are writing us 
frequently letters like the following: 

Your catalog for 1912, designated ROOT'S BEEKEEPERS' SUPPLIES, is received, 
and I certainly thank you for this book. I have had your catalog on my desk for 
years, and have used Root's supplies all along. I note the enlargement and improve- 
ment in your new catalog, and notice many things I expect to add to my apiary. 

Crystal City, Texas. C. W. Cox. 

Our catalog this season also gives a full and complete list of books and booklets which we 
can supply. Many of these booklets are free, which doesn't mean that they are not worth read- 
ing, but simply that we want you to be informed on the subjects of which they treat. Send for a 
catalog, and check those in which you are interested. 



Quick Deliveries 



Next to having the best goods made, there is nothing so important to the beekeeper in the 
busy season as to have goods delivered just when they are wanted most. It isn't always possible 
to ship goods from a distant factory and have them reach destination within a day or two, as 
is sometimes necessary during the height of the season, but with distributing-houses located in 
the large shipping-centers we are able to supply beekeepers everywhere, with no loss of time 
and with minimum transportation charges. 



Send Your Hurry Orders 



to any one of the offices listed below, and let us show you what we can do for you in point of 
service. Cars are going to these branches at the rate of two or three a week, so the stocks are 
new and fresh, and we usually have just what you Avant. If it isn't in stock at your nearest 
branch our manager will include your order with his specifications and you may have your goods 
come in the next car, thereby saving on transportation charges and getting the goods in better 
shape than you would by local freight. 



Whatever Your Wants 



we can supply you, and, of course, there is no question about the quality of our goods. The 
name "ROOT" in connection with bee-supplies means the best of every thing in this line, and 
the best is always the cheapest, as our customers will testify. If you have never used our 
supplies you should make a trial of them this season. Once used, we are sure you will want 
no other. 

I have just received my goods, order No. 10,739. I am more than pleased with 
them. I had intended to make my hives, but when I received the sample hive and saw 
the No. 1 pine lumber from which it was made, and considering the workmanship, I am 
satisfied I can buy cheaper than I can make them; enough cheaper to save the price of 
the lumber. O. C. Mills, Barton Ldg., Vt. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

New York, 139-141 Franklin St. Chicag-o, 213-231 Institute Flace 

Fliiladelpbia, 8-10 Tine St. Ses Moines, 565 "W. Serentb St. 

St. FanI, 1024 Mississippi St. Syracuse, 1631 Genesee St. 

"Washing-ton, 1100 Maryland Ave. S-'W. 
Mechanic Falls, Maine 




DiBtributing: Depots in Many 
Iiarg-e Centers 

The A. I. Root Company 

Executive Offices and Factory 

MEDINA, OHIO 




THE CHAS. F, MAY CO., PRINTERS, DETROIT. MICH. 







PubJishGd Mont% 




SEPT. 
1912 

yr -IT ^w 

DETROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLUR PER YEAR 



This Big Touring Car $1600 

Completely Equipped 



A Classy big car — that will fairly fly over the roads. De- 
sigrned for the utmost comfort and attractiveness, rive 
passengrer capacity. 




SEIiF-STARTEB, TOO. 



^ The special features of the Cartercar make this the best 
popular priced touring car value on the market. It has the 
patented Friction Transmission which makes it far superior 
to any gear driven car from an efficiency standpoint. It 
will climb a 50% grade — has any number of speeds — one 
lever control — no jerks or jars — and without the usual gears. 
^ Four other excellent models. They are every one lead- 
ers in their class. Full floating rear axle, valve encased 
motor, three quarter rear elliptic springs, and all modern 
ideas. Let us send you catalog. 

Cartercar Company 

Pontiac, Michigan 

BRANCHES: NEW VOBK, CHICAGO, DETROIT, KANSAS CITV. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 321 



Perfect Rendering of Wax 

From Old Comb and Cappings has always been a serious stumbling 
block for the bee-keeper. 

We have overcome this obstacle by installing a mighty Hydraulic 
Press, which extracts every particle of wax from the slumgum. Our 
charge for rendering is 5c a lb., and we pay you the highest market 
price, remitting the day after rendering. 

Our process — extracting all the wax — more than pays the charges, 
and leaves you a greater profit than you expected, besides relieving you 
of that messy and unsatisfactory job of rendering. 

Barrel up your old comb and cappings and let us surprise you, as we 
have the many who have already shipped theirs. 

We need great quantities of Comb and Extracted Honey. 

Write us. 

THE FRED W. MUTH CO. 

" The Busy Bee Men " 

51 Walnut St. CINCINNATI, O. 



White Comb Honey 

Fancy and No. 1. 

We Need Large Quantities and 
Can Use Yours 

WRITE us 

American Butter & Cheese Co. 

31-33 Griswold St. Detroit, Mich. 



322 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Special Delivery 

During this month we shall double our usual efforts in points of delivery and service. 
Early indications not having been most favorable, it is possible many beekeepers will not 
have laid in a sufficient stock- of supplies, such as sections and foundation, for the clover 
and basswood this month. We are prepared to make up for this oversight by having a 
large stock of both sections and foundations on hand for instant delivery. We carry 
nothing but the Root make, which insures the best quality of everything. \\'e sell at 
factory prices, thereby insuring a uniform rate to everyone. The saving on transportation 
cliarges from Cincinnati to points south of us will mean quite an item to beekeepers in 
this territory. We are so located that we can make immediate shipment of any order 
the day it is received. 

Honey and Wax 

If you haven't made arrangements for the disposition of your honey and wax tor 
this season, consult us. We buy both in large quantities, and can assure you of fair 
and courteous treatment, and a good price for j-our crop. 

Shipping-cases 

To sell your crop to the best advantage it must be well put up in attractive style. 
W^e have shipping cases that answer every requirement of looks and utility. Small pro- 
ducers who sell their crops locally will be interested in the cartons in which comb honey 
is put up to sell to the fancy customers at top-notch prices. We have honey-cans, too, in 
cases for those who produce extracted honey. In fact, there isn't anything we don't have 
that the beekeeper needs, cither to produce his crop or help to sell it. 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 



2 1 46 Central Ave. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



u 



falcon^^ Queens 



Threo-baiiileil Italinii>4 — Goldeu 
Italians — t'arniolau.s 

Rest of 1912 Season. 

Untested, 1, 75c; 6, $4.25; 12, $S.OO. 

Select untested. $1.00; 6, $5.50; 12, 
$10.00. 

Tested. $1.50 each; 6, $S.00; 12, $15. 

Select tested, $2.00 each; 6, $10.00; 
12. $18.00. 

Safe arrival and satisfaction guar- 
anteed. 

Wc charge 10c for clipping a queen's 
wings. 

"Falfon" Shii»i»iiig-Ca.sfS "Falcou" 

Insure safe arrival of your comb 
honey and better price by using the 
best i)rotection cases made. 



W. T. FALCONER MFG. CO. 

Palcoiif-r, ]\". V. 

Dealers Everywhere. 



PAGE-KEN KEL 
MFG. CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

"NONE BETTER" 
Bee - Keepers' 



Suppli 



les 



THIRTY YEARS EXPERIENCE 

Pcrftct s-.ctions from young, white, 
kiln dried basswood. White Pine Hives 
and Supers, Excellent Shipping Cases, 
Hrood Frames, Separators, etc. 

We invite your correspondence. 



PAGE-KENKEL 

Manufacturer 

New London, Wis. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



323 



IF BEES COULD TALK 

They Would Say: 

"GIVE as 

'Dadant's Foundation' 



IT'S CLEAN, ITS PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES " 



If you are not using " DAD ANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DADANT & SON S, fL\%'i!?l°.^: 
A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 



Review Advertising Pays 



Ottice of 
DR. CHAS. (i. SC'HA3IU 
ro;)-701-701i University Bnililing;, Syracuse, IV. Y. 



Dear Mr. Tyrrell : — 

For the September and October months, just run a little notice in your 
journal to watch for Nov. 1st issue. At present I have more orders than 

I can fill. 

Yours truly. 

Chas. G. Schamu. 



FxTZPATRicK. Ala., Aug. 9, 1912. 
Gentlemen : — 

"^'ou will please discontinue my liner under the head of "Bees and Queens 
For Sale." I have all I can do, so don't want any more orders. 

Yours truly, 

W. D. ACHORD. 



324 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




(ESTABLISH F:D 1888) 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSOCIATION 

Office OF Pu BLiCATiON - - - 230 \A/oodlan d Aven u e 

VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, SEPTEMBER 1, 1912. No. 9. 

The Hutchinson Bee Cellars. 

ELMER HUTCHINSON. 

'^^^ HE past winter I have received a good many inquiries about 
^j our bee cellars here in Northern ]\Iichigan. People wish- 
to know how they are built, how we arrange the bees in 
them, what care we gi\'e them winters, if any, etc., etc. The 
Editor of the Review has kindly allowed me to answer them all at 
once in the Reniew. 

HOW TKZ: CBIiIiARS ARE BUII.T. 

Several years ago my brother. \\'. Z. H., described very fully 
in the Review how our cellars were built. For the benefit of those 
who have not read the articles, I will briefly describe how are 
cellars are built, ^\"hen possible, we alwa.vs choose a side iiill for 
the site on which to build, making the door at the lower end ; we 
do not have to have any stairs. I would rather have the door facing 
North. South is the least desirable, but we have to have the door 
face whichever way the hill slopes. 

We use a team and scraper to dig the hole, then set cedar 
posts about three feet apart along the sides and ends; then we 
spike a 2x8 crosswise of the cellar to each pair of posts, on the 
sides of the posts, letting them come even with the top of the posts ; 
then spike a 2x8 lengthwise of the cellar on each side on top of the 
posts, and one across each end. Then we board up the sides and 
ends with inch lumber, nail a floor overhead to the bottom side of 
the joists, and build a hatchway at the lower end. We now use a 
team to scrape the earth back around the cellar, banking it up even 



326 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



with the top ; then wc put the rafters on, nail the lioards on the 
gable ends, then nail on the roof boards and co\ er with tarred felt, 
then cover the lloor overhead with 12 or 14 inches of sawdust. The 
most of otir cellars are built 1-lxlG feet, and about T feet deep. We 
have wintered as many as 165 colonies in each cellar, with good 
results. To build a cellar of this size, paying $l.oO per day for 
labor, $'3.50 for man and team, and from $12 to SlG per M. for 
lumber, will cost from $40 to SoO. 

If the walls were btiilt of stone or cement, it W(nild require a 
more complicated system of ventilation. AMth an earth floor, board 
walls and sawdust overhead, the air soaks in slowly from every 
side and of a tiniform temperature. A hatchway eiL^ht feet long, 
with doors at each end, wnll answer all purposes for an ante-room. 
T do not believe a partition through the cellar would be desirable; 
it would interfere some with the ventilation. 

One man Welshes to know if the sun shining on the roof in the 
spring w'ould not heat up the cellar enough through the opening in 
the floor overhead, so the bees would become uneasy. When it gets 
so warm that the cellar cannot be kept cool enough by opening the 




Getting Ready to Build a Hutchinson Cellar. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



327 




A Hutchinson Cellar Completed. 

inside door to the hatchway, it is high time the bees were carried 
out — usually long' before that here. 

HOW WE ARRANGE THE BEES IN THE CEI.I.AB. 

A\'e tier them up. four and five colonies high, leaving" the covers 
on and the bottom boards off, letting the bottom ends of each hive 
rest on sticks about an inch thick to raise it up from the one below 
and give space for ventilation and dead bees to drop out. We pile 
a row along each side and across the back end. next the cellar wall, 
leaving the front end next the door to pile the l:)ottom boards. Then 
we pile another row far enough away from the first row to leave 
an alley wide enough so a person can walk through it, thus giving 
an opportunity to examine any colony in the cellar from the bottom 
of the hive. "\\'e leave the center aisle open the whole length of 
the cellar, as it gives a better draft from the hatchway to the \-enti- 
lator at the back end of the cellar. 



VENTILATION AND TEMPERATURE. 



In the light sandy soil here in Xorthern Michigan we are able 
to get all the ventilation necessary by means of an opening about 
2x3 feet throuph the floor overhead near the back end of the cellar. 



328 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

There should be no spout extending down in the cellar; the spout 
should begin at the top of the cellar and end at the top of the 
sawdust overhead. We regulate the temperature by partly covering 
or uncovering this opening, and by opening or closing the inner 
door to the hatchway. For some time I have had my doubts that 
it was necessary to keep our bee cellars here as warm as the ''bee 
doctors" all say we must, // all the necessary conditions for perfect 
wintering are present, A'iz., a z'cr\ dry cellar, good stores, and plenty 
of good healthy bees. I let the temperature of one of my cellars 
go down the fore part of last January to 31 degrees, and it hardly 
varied from that until the last week of March, and during all my 
bee-keeping experiences of more than thirty years I never had bees 
winter better, or consume less stores. I will add that out of more 
than 200 colonies we only lost one in the cellars last winter, and 
that died of starvation. Now, if the Editor will allow me, I will 
tell something that may be of interest to many of his readers : Being 
associated in the bee business here with my brother, \V. Z. H., and 
being much together, of course I knew of much that was being done 
and planned behind the lines in the office of the Reviev;. "When my 
brother's health began to fail, he began to consider the matter of 
getting someone to help him edit and publish the Review, and out 
of all his wide acquaintance among men, and bee-keepers, he decided 
that E. B. Tyrrell was the best man to fill the place. So you see 
his mantle fell on the shoulders he would have chosen to wear it. 
I also believe that he would be glad could he know that the Review 
is now owned by and is the ofihcial organ of the X. A. B. K. A., 
for he always had a warm place in his heart for the old association. 
Pioneer, Mich. 

[It will be noted that by building the cellar in a side hill (providing a suit- 
able hill having the desired slope can be had), the bottom of the cellar can be 
on a level with the bee-yard, thus making it possible to walk right in with the 
heavy swarms without climbing stairs, one of the most convenient arranged cellar 
door contrivances possible. 

It will be noticed that the cellar door is preferred at the north end of the 
cellar. The critical period in cellar wintering of bees is in the spring of the 
year, or in other words the last few weeks that the bees are confined m the cellar. 
The long confinement has caused the bees to become uneasy. This disturbance 
causes a rise in the temperature in the cellar which aggravates the trouble. The 
door in the north end of the cellar will have a tendency to keep the cellar more 
cool during this period. Many of the bee-cellars of the out-yard bee-men of 
Northern Michigan are built of this same cheap construction as are the Hutchinsons'. 
These cellars will last from six to ten years, by which time the location may 
"play out," when a new cellar is built at some more favorable location. Saw-dust 
seems to be a favorite material for the covering of bee-cellars, while some use 
earth, preferably sand. 

A more substantial cellar, but still cheap where stone is plenty, is the one 
built and used by Hubbard Bros.. Boyne Falls. Mich. The side hill feature of 
the Hutchinson cellar is retained, but instead of posts and boards for the sides, 
they are laid up with loose stone, no mortar being used. The wall is laid some- 
what sloping, so it will stand better — that is, the cellar when completed is a little 
longer and wider at the top than at the bottom. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 329 



Unskilled labor will lay these loose stone walls, and they told the writer that 
they found by experience that but very little slope was necessary to make a wall 
of this description stand. 

The hatchway is also built of stone the same as the rest of the cellar, and is 
enclosed with double doors. A novel feature of this cellar is the covering, which 
is of logs. Their cellars are in the forest, or what used to be a forest before the 
suitable timber for lumber was cut and taken off. The logs for the cover are cut 
four to six feet longer than the width of the cellar and are laid close together 
forming a complete cover to the cellar, thus forming a frame-work to hold the 
marsh hay that "chinks"' up the openings ready for the sand covering, which is 
scraped on with a team. 

The sand cover is about three feet deep when complete, or enough cover to 
turn any frost that is likely to penetrate. When this is done a substantial cover 
is built over all to turn the water and keep the cellar dry. 

"Fairy tales" are told of the crops of comb honey gathered by the bees win- 
tered in these cellars. Hubbard Bros, are invited to describe their method of 
management in the production of comb honey for the pages of the Review'. 

A considerable number of the Hutchinson covers are of the Heddon-Blanton 
type. They are a perfectly flat board with cleated ends. Were a hive set directly 
upon this cover it would be entirely closed, thus the necessity of the inch square 
sticks placed between the hives for ventilation when tiered up in the cellar. 
Covers with sloping sides ma}' not need these sticks, as the cover below would 
furnish ample ventilation for the hive above. 

Attention is called to the low temperature of 34 degrees in the cellar, and 
successful wintering. The conditions necessary for success being "a very dry 
cellar, good stores, and a plenty of good healthy bees." A thought comes in here 
that may be worth considering in the cellar wintering of bees, i. e., the drier the 
cellar the lower the temperature that will winter successfully. Admitting this to 
be a fact would be no argument against the dry cellar and a high temperature, 
for it would be the equal or better than the damp cellar, no matter what the tem- 
perature. Likely the greatest drawback to the damp cellar is it will not stand a 
low temperature for anj' great length of time without bad results. 

We are wintering in our big cellar in Charlevoix Co. without loss with a tem- 
perature of from 46 to 56 degrees, while Hutchinson's cellar winters equally as 
well with a temperature of 34 degrees, which goes to show that the temperature 
of a bee cellar is of secondary consideration, strong colonies with a plenty of 
good store being the prime requisite. — Townsend.] 



Feeding for Winter Stores. 

DAVID RUNNING. 

' ■■ Jl N our localit}', where otir entire crop of siirpkis honey is 
Jl secured from v.'hite and alsike clover, and the flow stops about 
July 15, it is necessary to feed for winter stores. \Vhile our 
bees usually get a little honey in August and September, they sel- 
dom get enough to last them through the winter. AVe are producers 
of extracted honey only, and we use the eight-frame Langstroth 
hive entirely. As soon as the crop is extracted we start looking 
over our bees and getting them in shape for winter. 

SEE THAT EACH COI.ONY IS HEADED WITH A GOOD QUEEN. 

At this time we want to see that each colony is headed with 
a good queen and has sufficient stores to last well into September. 
Each colony is left with one extracting super above queen excluder, 



330 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



and if any are short of 
stores we supph* a comb 
or more of honey, after 
which they are left entirely 
atene until aliout Septem- 
ber "30, when all supers are 
taken off with bee-escapes 
(to avoid robbing") and we 
commence feeding as soon 
as possible. We usually 
feed our out yards first and 
proceed about as follows : 

ONE HUNDRED COI.ONIi:3 ARE 
KEPT IN EACH YARD. 

^^'e keep about inO col- 
onies in eacli yard. We 
load up as many feeders as 
we ha^'e colonies at the 
yard to be fed, taking- along 
what sugaf we need, also a 
six-barrel galvanized tank 
( the same as used for an 
uncapping tank when ex- 
tracting), and a three-burner 
gasoline stove. Upon arrival 
at the apiary the tank is set 
up high enough so that the 
stove will slip under when 
lighted. The tank is then 
filled about two-thirds full of water (water being measured). The 
stove is lighted up and put in place. We now proceed to weigh up 
our hives. We set a common counter scale on the wheelbarrow 
and weigh each colony. A colony of bees in an eight-frame Jiiz'e made 
of zi'hite pine Iiiinber slioiild zceigh 7vJien fed for zvinter (cellar win- 
tering), 60 pounds, so we can make a record as follo^^■s: 
Hive No. ^^^eighs Xeeds 

1 48 12 

•2 56 4 

3 43 1 r 

After the yard is weighed up we place a feeder at the ]:)ack of 
each hive. By this time (about 5 o'clock in evening) the water is 
boiling, when we start mixing the syrup. 

HOW THE SYRUP IS MADE. 

I usually have two helpers, one on each side of the tank, each 
with a good-sized stick, who stir the syrup while I put in the sugar 




David Running's Feeder. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



331 




Another View of the Running Feeder. 



as fast as possible, putting- in tz\.'o pails of sugar for each of water. 
Syrup is stirred continually until sugar is thoroughly dissolved, 
when the fire is turned out and we begin to feed. The sugar, of 
course, has cooled the syrup somewhat, but it is still hot. 

WEIGHIITG THE SYBUP FOR WINTER FEEB. 

The scales are now set up beside the tank and the weighing is 
started. \\'e use four pails, and one person does the weighing while 
another carries to the A^ard, so there are always two pails inside 
and there is no time lost. I now go to the yard and begin at Hive 
Xo. 1, taking off the coAcr and placing feeder on top. Pour in the 
hot syrup, bciiii; sure to sl^iH a little doz^ii through the feeder on to the 
bees, which immediately starts them running up into the feeder. 
Put cover back on top of feeder and pass on to Hive No. '?, where 
same thing is repeated. Thus you will see that it is an easy matter 
for three persons to feed 100 colonies in three or four hours after 
the weighing is done, feeders placed, and syrup properly mixed. 
In weighing up the syrup we allow one pound for shrinkage for 
each five pounds fed. The shrinkage will be greater than that, but 
we find that when colonies are fed as above that they have sufficient 
stores to last them through until after fruit bloom, which usually 
comes here the latter part of ^lay. 

WHEN THE FEESINa SHOVI.D BE DONE. 

We want all feeding done by the last of September, and do not 
want bees disturbed after this until time to move them home or 

put into cellar. 



332 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

THE FEEDER TO USE, AND HOW TO IVIAKE. 

The feeder that I use is made as follows: The rim is made of 
74-inch pine and is same size outside as the brood-chamber and 
4% inches deep. Corners are halved thus: 



? 



They are nailed both ways with thick paint in 
joints to keep them from leaking: bottom is put 
in same way, being left open about 1^^ inches in 
middle. There are now two partitions extending 
up from this opening to within yi inch of top, making two com- 
partments for syrup. The bottom and partitions are made of 
S'^-inch stufif. The feeder is coated on the inside with paraffin. A 
little clean straw is put in feeder to act as floats for the bees, since 
bees are allowed free access to the entire feeder. You can see that 
by this method of feeding that a large force of bees gets to work 
immediately, and the syrup, being hot, is usually taken down in one 
night, even if the weather is quite cold. I got the idea of this 
feeder from that able and well known bee-keeper, Mr. V\m. ]\Ic- 
Evoy, of Woodbury, Ont. We usually take the feeders off by the 
use of bees-escapes, as by so doing all robbing is avoided, as is the 
case when a whole yard is fed at once, and that in the evening. 

ORDINARY FEEDERS ARE TOO SI.OW WHEN FEEDING IN A 
WH01.ESAI.E WAY. 

I formerly used the regular ]\liller feeder, the Roardman 
entrance feeder, the Doolittle division board feeder, and the Alex- 
ander feeder, but found them all too slow when feeding on a large 
scale. I still have thirty of the ^filler feeders and use them some- 
times, but have discarded the little cover that goes with them to 
keep bees out of the syrup, and use them same as my own make 
by putting straw in the two compartments and giving bees free 
access to the entire surface of the syrup. They are thus made prac- 
tical, but do not always hold enough, as they are made small enough 
to go inside of a regular comb honey super, while mine are made 
the same size as super. I found that in using the Miller feeder in 
the regular way that the syrup Avould become cold before the bees 
could get it all taken down, and after it Avas cold they would take 
it very slow ; but with our method there is a large feeding surface 
and the bees get it all down before it gets cold. In 1910 we fed an 
average of 14 pounds of sugar per colony and got an average of 
122% pounds of choice surplus clover honey. Last year we got an 
average of 91 pounds per colony (which we think was a big yield, 
considering the poor season) and had to feed an average of 15 
pounds of sugar per colony for winter stores. 

Grindstone Citv. Mich. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 333 



[At our State Association meet at Saginaw last December, there was one 
member who seemed to be getting good paying crops of honey even in these poor 
seasons. When the rest of us were satisfied in barely making a living, he, seem- 
ingly, by some method was securing big crops of clover honey. 

It did not take long to find out the secret; he was feeding large quantities of 
sugar syrup for winter stores, while the most of us were trying to economize 
on account of the bad seasons. This man had had so much confidence in the 
bees that he had gone ahead and fed the bees regardless of conditions, and he won 
out. This man was member David Running, Grindstone City, Michigan. 

Think of it! Two years ago an average of over 122 lbs. of clover extracted 
honey per colony Spring count. The poor season of a year ago his average was 
91 lbs. from 283 swarms. 

In a private letter he says that his this year's average will be somewhat better 
than a year ago, which will mean round the 100 lb. average mark. Had the 
weather been better this year his crop would have been considerably more. 

He has partly promised to write up his whole system of working for the 
pages of the Review. Then we will all know hovv- to secure a crop of honey even 
in a bad year. 

To convert the Miller feeder into a McEvoy feeder, remove the cover and 
inside partition. This will throw the whole reservoir into one open feeder, a la 
Running. — Townsend.] 



A Form of Record for Bee-Keepers Who Wish to 
Improve Their Stock. 

HARRISON H. BROWN. 

'^^^ O carry out Air. Howe's ideas requires careful records, com- 
\Sj pact and instantly accessible. The success of the whole 
scheme depends on extreme simplicity and brevity of form. 
For my own use I have worked out a scoring- card which seems to 
meet the conditions. The scoring points are taken from Mr. ?Iowe's 
articles, as follows : 

Fecundit}^ — Same as prolificness F 

Load carried by each bee L 

Uniformity of color and banding, indicating fixity of 

other qualities U 

Vigor of flight V 

Wintering W 

Yield (units of 20 lbs.) Y 

These qualities, except yield, are graded on a scale 0, 1, 2, 3. 
Three represents highest quality, zero practical worthlessness. Yield 
is reckoned in units of 20 lbs. 4=80 lbs. annual yield. 

The following qualities : Propolis P 

Brace Comb B 

Capping C 

Disposition D 

Swarming S 

are best when LOWEST in numerical scale, LEAST propolis, brace 
comb and swarming, whitest and cleanest capping, gentlest disposi- 



334 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



tion. They are graded on a scale 0, 1, 2, 3, — where represents best 

quality and 3 the worst. 

These points are recorded bv the followinfr ^^ , n \r \ir v 

t- u 1U1 1- '-^1^ u I rLiUViWY 

scheme — above and below a hne with two short r^^TTlc 

1 r B L U o 
cross marks: 

Note the easy sequence of the letters — FL — U V W Y and 
P— BCD— S. 

indicates a prospective breeder which swarmed 
Thus: !? ^l": ^ 1 once, yielded 180 lbs. of honey, and graded high- 
est in other respects. 

The record is like a common fraction, of maximum value with 
large numbers above and small ones below. An omitted quality 
creates no confusion. 

There remain three points suggested b}' 'Sir. Howe, Age and 
Heredity of Queens, and Longevity of workers. The age of a 
queen is shown by last figure of the year she was hatched, after 
the stand or hive number. 89-3 is this year's queen on stand 89. 
I find it works best for a number of reasons to number the stands 
rather than the hives. 

Heredity applies only to breeders, which should be given more 
room for special records. Longevity may well be left for a separ- 
ate record if desired, as its effects will appear in the records above, 
and it is difficult to value directly. 

We draw a vertical line to the right and set down j^ 
pounds of honey taken off, at different times. The K side 
represents comb honey, the X side extracted. 

The space beneath the stand number is used for inspection rec- 
ords. Here we give dates by figures, and abbreviate. H stands for 
frames of stores, B frames of worker brood, O? probably queenless, 
F B foul brood, D B drone brood, S swarmed, Ivs comb super, etc. 

4-11 H.J B, shows that on April 11 we found the equivalent of 
three frames of stores and four frames of healthy worker brood. 

Lmder the stand number in brackets is the number of the par- 
ent colony or breeding queen. A complete record would look like 
this, for colony number 89 : — 



RQ-2 2 3 3 2,3 5 




(117-0) 1 1 11 1 






24 




4-11 Ha B4 


20 




6-12 O.K. K.S 


16 




7- 4 S. 102 


18 




10- 2 0. K. lor Winter .... 




25 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 335 

This colony swarmed July 4, and the old hive was set on stand 
1.02. It produced 78 lbs. of comb honey and 'lo lbs. of extracted. 
It came originally from colony IIT, wdiose queen was raised in 1910. 
Comb super set on June 12. 

No special book is required. A plain ruled note-book -4 inches 
by 6 will take three records to a page. The two lines of the record 
forms are drawn by hand. 

Laplata, Xew Mexico. 

[Mr. Brown has given us in the above article a detailed method of keeping a 
record concerning the work of our queens. Some such records it seems to me is 
necessary in order to carry out the teachings of Mr. Howe. Whether this method 
is the best one or not is of course hard to say without giving the matter a great , 
deal of study. At the same time it is one that will interest you and is worthy of 
\our careful studv.] 



A Few Practical Pointers. 

O. B. METCALFE. 

THE USE OF QUEEN EXCI.UDERS. 

'^^i T IS advisable to use queen excluders in producing extracted 
Tl honey in New Mexico or any similar locality. While visiting- 
California State Bee-Keepers' Association meeting in Los 
Angeles, I noted that every up-to-date bee-keeper in the state used 
the queen excluder in connection with the production of extracted 
honey. They may even be a disadvantage to a slip-shod bee-keeper, 
but the busy man Avho is making things move and who has to count 
on each of his men to jerk off- a couple of thousand pounds of honey 
per hour, is the one who cannot get along without the excluder in 
the production of extracted honey. If you live in a locality where 
the queen goes on what I call "an egg-laying rampage" in the spring, 
as she does in New Mexico, take off your queen excluders until 
about the time your comb honey producing neighbor is through with 
the swarming season, and then put back your excluders and work 
in comfort the rest of the season. AVith profit, too, for those 
excluders will save you many a fine queen before the end of the 
season, if you are the kind that goes out in the bee yard to take 
off honey and not to mince around. 

HOW PAR -WIIiXi BEES FLY? 

How far bees will fly and store honey to a profit depends on 
two things: First, the plant they are to get it from; second, as to 
whether or not intervening plants have led the bees to the field. 
I have seen bees working on mesquite where the nearest bushes 
were a mile and a half and the bulk of the yard seemed to be going 
about two miles, with the result that scales under an a\'erage hive 



336 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

showed nine pounds gain. They will make a good gain off from 
a good field of alfalfa a mile distant, and I would count on a good 
deal of surplus from one and one-half miles. Two years ago one 
of my neighbors had a yard two miles from the only orchard that 
was sprayed, and the bees carried enough arsenate of lead from 
the fruit bloom at that distance to kill some of the colonies outright. 

THE HANBIiINCr OF BAITS. 

Unfinished sections can be disposed of best as baits the follow- 
ing year. Xever dispose of an unfinished section unless you are 
sure you have all the baits you need for the next season. Uncap 
*and extract them and then put them away as careful!}' as your 
mother used to store away her preserves. They mean even more 
to you. If you are like me and do not know where to buy a knife 
to uncap them, take one of the iron or steel straps that come around 
sheet iron roofing, and nail two pieces of half-inch board "straddle" 
of it for a distance of about six inches to form a handle ; then bend 
an oft'set in about like that in a Bingham uncapping knife and cut 
it off so as to leave a blade about the right length, to go down in the 
sections. Sharpen this blade and w4th two knives of this pattern 
heated in a small pot of boiling water you can uncap these sections 
well and quickl}'. Begin your cut at the middle of the section and 
cut to one side, then skip back to the middle and uncap the other 
half. If you do not have baskets to contain these sections in the 
extractor baskets, take a piece of half-inch board the size that two 
sections will just stand on and leave it sticking out slightly at each 
end; through these ends bore small holes and in these holes tie the 
two ends of a hay wire so that the loop will be just large enough 
to take eight sections standing on top of each other in pairs. Take 
the hay wire in one hand and let the half-inch slat or bottom piece 
into the basket of the extractor; set two sections on it and let down 
in the basket far enough to take two more sections, and so on until 
you have eight, or one extractor basket full. When they are 
extracted, catch hold of the wire and lift them all out at once. By 
pressing down on the top sections with the thumb you can swing 
the eight sections around over your head if you like, or you can 
instantly drop them out of the wire basket. This little contrivance 
can be made in less time than it takes to tell it, and it is no "dinky" 
little thing to fool away time with but a thing that a busy man can 
save time with in extracting thousands of bait section^. 

rASTElIING FOUNDATION IN SHAI.I.OW FRAMES. 

Fasten foundation in shallow extract frames where the grooves 
are filled with wax by scraping the frame first with a knife and then 
standing the frame on its top l^ar; take a hardwood stick with an 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 337 

offset in it, which will allow the end of the stick to come to the 
middle of the top bar, when the offset is slid along the edge of the 
top bar. Take this stick in the right hand and the sheet of founda- 
tion in the left. Place the foundation, lying flat, so that it will lay 
with the edge just past the middle of the top bar. Wet the hard- 
wood stick and slide it along on top of the foundation, bearing 
down on it hard enough to fasten the foundation. You will get it 
done so much faster than you did the first time with the grooves, 
and so much better, that you will wonder what those same grooves 
were made for. I got the idea from Air. W. H. Laws, of Beeville, 
Texas. 

Mesilla Park, New ^Mexico. 



A Real National Co-operative Organization for 

Bee-Keepers. 

GEO. W. YORK. 

President Xational Bee-Keepers' Association. 

"^Jl T BEGINS to look as if the long-time dream of some of us is 
^ about to be fulfilled, or come true. Co-operation in many lines 
has been "in the air" for years. In some lines, for instance, it 
has been realized quite fully, but in many lines of benefit it has 
been only a hoped-for benefit. But since the last meeting of the 
National Bee-Keepers' Association at Minneapolis there has been 
"something doing," and it would seem that it must result in ines- 
timable benefit to the bee-keepers of America. 

In the first place, the present live set of Directors are pushing 
things. This is no reflection upon the excellent Directors and JNIan- 
ager of other years. But through the adoption of a new constitu- 
tion, which permits progressive action along many lines, bee-keepers 
can easily see now that the way is rapidly opening up so that their 
National Association is going to be of increased service and value 
to them. What is most needed now is that every bee-keeper in the 
land shall become a member of the National, and thus a regular 
reader of its official organ, the Bee-Keepers'" Review. In that way 
they will learn how they can co-operate with all the other members 
in a way that cannot but help being beneficial to every individual 
member of the Association. 

No, sir ; don't drop your subscription to the other bee papers. 
If you want to make the largest success of bee-keeping, you will 
need all the best literature you can get on the subject. Besides, the 
subscription price of each is so small, that just a half-witted bee- 
keeper should be able to "extract" from its pages many times its 
cost in valuable instruction along lines that are bound to make his 



338 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




Pres, George W. York's Home at Sandpoint, Idaho. 
Mrs. York in the Buggy. 



apiary more profitable. What is needed is a strong" pull, and a pull 
all together to make the National Bee-Keepers' Association during 
the next year or two what it should have been many years ago. It 
can be done. 

Sandpoint, Idaho. 



Comb vs. Extracted Honey. 

BY N. E. MILLER. 

"^^^ HERE is getting to be too much of a tendency for the comb 
4J^ honey man to turn to the production of extracted honey. I 
have produced both for about ten years and will say that, if 
the tendency continues to grow, I will turn more of my attention 
to comb honey for production. My reasons for it are : First, the 
difference in the price obtained ; second, the ready market for comb 
honey if it is properly put up and sold at the right time. It should 
be graded and packed as soon as the bees are through with their 
part of the work. I ha\-e had experience in both extracted and 
comb honey production ; it is not a question with me, but actual 
experience. 

{Concluded o>i piJge j^ss) 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 339 



Published Monthly 
E. B. TYRRELL, Managing Editor. 
Office — 230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Michigan 
Associate Editors: 
E. D. TOWNSEXD, Northstar, Mich. WESLEY FOSTER, Boulder, Colo. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Discontinuances — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a reqviest to that effect. 

Ailvertisinjf rates on application. 



EDITORIAL 



Call this our Review, not theirs. — [Townsend.] 



"Don't crv over spilt milk. Grab the pail and start after another 
cow."' 



Death of Walter M. Parrish. 

The friends and former patrons of Walter M. Parrish, of Law- 
rence, Kansas, will be pained to learn of his death, wdiich occurred 
on July 18. He had been in failing- health for a number of years 
and had come to Southern California a few months ago, but the 
change of climate failed to restore his health. 

Mr. Parrish was from childhood a great nature lover, and his 
interest in bees, which began very early in life, remained with him 
to the end. He was well known as a contributor to the bee jour- 
nals, but his principal line of work was that of queen breeder. 

The honesty and integrity of Walter Parrish are well known to 
those who have had dealings with him, but only those who knew 
him intimately are able to fully appreciate his sterling w^orth. 

Levi J. Ray. 

Monrovia, Calif.. August 0, 1912. 



A Word of Introduction. 



In assuming the role of Editor, or rather as one of the Board 
of Editors of the Bee-Keepers' Review, I have nothing to offer, 
except that it might be experience as a bee-keeper. During the 37 
years I have been with the bees, a considerable experience has been 
had in the production of both comb and extracted honey, especially 



340 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

the latter. The last twelve years as a specialist, when the entire 
livelihood of a large family has been secured from the product of 
the hive. This experience with ihe bees and a willing hand 
ever ready to help a brother, is about all the excuse I have to olTer 
in accepting this honorable position. 

Just the same common every-day language that has always 
characterized my writings in the past will be adhered to in the 
future. If I do not "make good" you will have the consolation of 
knowing that you will not have to retain me longer than the Dele- 
gate Meeting in February, when a new board will be elected. — 
[Townsend.] 

Fellow Bee-Keeper, Have Confidence in Your Brother. 

The great stumbling block of organization is "lack of con- 
fidence." Does the present management of the National Bee- 
Keepers' Association deserve your confidence, is a question to be 
considered by the prospective member. Do you have confidence 
in the men who produce the honey and wax in your Association? 
If you do, you should have confidence in the present officers and 
directors, for they are producers pure and simple, and not in any 
way connected with any financial venture that might influence them 
in the least. If the prospective member does not have confidence 
in the present management, I beg the privilege of asking where 
you will go for material for your future management. Fellow bee- 
keeper, do you know that you are living in the midst of organization, 
unorgani::cdf 

The hand of fellowship is extended. In renewing your member- 
ship, why not have your neighbor bee-keeper join with you? A 
word of approval from you is worth much more than what I can say 
at this distance. Assure him he is welcome. If each member, or 
reader, would bring in just one with him, it would double our 
present membership. Will you do your part to enhance the value 
of the Association? We expect to be 6,000 strong at the end of 
next year, but to do this all will have to do their part. The ruralist 
is the last to organize ; it is our turn now, all others are in. — 
[Townsend.] 

Alighting Places for Swarms. 

Mr. Eugene E . Eraser, Big Rapids, Mich., the man who plants 
maple trees with their roots in the air for alighting places for swarms 
(July Review), reminds me of the time when we had a comb honey 
yard in Kalkaska Co., where we used a similar device, except we 
went to the swamp and cut evergreens and trimmed them, leaving 
a portion near the tip as heavy with brush as possible. Common 
drain tile were "planted" standing upon end at likely places for 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



341 



swarms to alight, then these evergreens stood in the open end. The 
opening in the tile, being a little larger than the tree, would admit 
it being removed with the swarm without jar, when the tree, swarm 
and all, were carried to the prepared hive and the bees dislodged 
and the tree returned for the next swarm. Sometimes another 
swarm would issue about the time the first was nicely clustered on 
the tree and begin to cluster with them. When it was thought that 
a half of the two swarms had clustered, the tree, bees and all, were 
carried to the prepared hive as before, but this time the bees were 
not shaken from the tree, but simply laid across the alighting board 
and covered with a common sheet. 

Without delay, before the other swarm in the air decide there 
is now nothing to alight upon at that point, another tree is provided 
and placed in the same tile, and the other swarm allowed to alight. 
Had we shaken the first swarm from the tree at the time of hiving, 
thus causing a commotion among the bees at their new hive, it 
would have attracted the other -swarm to that part of the yard, and 
they would have united and both entered the same hive. — 
[Townsend.] 




Death of the Hon. R. L. Taylor. 

Within a little over a year, Ivlichigan has 
sufl^ered the loss of four very prominent men in 
the bee-keeping ranks. Mr. W. Z. Hutchinson 
was first, Hon. Geo. E. Hilton next, followed 
a little later by Mr. James Heddon. and on 
August J 6 occurred the death of Hon. R. L. 
Taylor, of Lapeer, Mich., aged 72 years, 9 
months, 13 days. 

Mr. Taylor was closely connected with the 
early history of the Review. I find that the first 
issue, January 10, 1888, contains an article writ- 
ten by him. For years Mr. Taylor continued to contribute to its 
pages, conducting at one time a "Department of Criticism." 

Many times have I visited his home and looked over his 200 or 
thereabouts colonies of bees. These bees were all kept in one yard, 
and were wintered in a cellar under the barn. He used the F^eddon 
hive and produced comb honey exclusively. Besides liis l^ees he had 
a beautiful vineyard of grapes in which he look much ])ride. At one 
time he conducted experiments in bee-keeping for the Michigan 
Agricultural College. These were conducted at his home. Later he 
filled the position of State Insoectc^r of Apiaries. 

Mr. Taylor was born at Almont, in the same county in which 
he died. In 1862 he entered the State University and continued in 
the literary department for three years. He then entered the mer- 



342 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

cantile business for two and a half years, and returned to Ann Arbor 
and studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1869. He prac- 
ticed law at Almont till 1873, when he moved to Lapeer, having- 
been elected Register of Deeds the previous fall. He served a sec- 
ond term in this office and in 1880 was elected Prosecuting -\ttorney, 
serving one term and declining a second nomination. He was super- 
visor of Lapeer one year and a Justice of the Peace four years. 
From 1889-92 he served in the State Senate, making a remarkable 
record. His independence and fearlessness made him one of the 
strongest leaders of that very stormy session. 

Retiring from political life, Mr. Taylor turned his attention to 
his bees and grapes, excelling in this as in his public career. His 
grapes were among the best produced, and he always secured the 
best crops of honey. 

He was honored by his fellow bee-keepers by being elected 
President of the Michigan Bee-Keepers' Association and Director of 
the National Association. The latter position he held up to the end 
of 1911. 

Mr. Taylor was an active church worker until his health began 
to fail, being an elder of the First Presbyterian Church of Lapeer 
for a number of years. He leaves, besides a wife, three brothers 
and three sisters. The Review extends to them our heartfelt sym- 
pathy in this dark hour of affliction. — [Tyrrell.] 



Send In Your Pictures. 

It is getting more and more the "fad" to illustrate periodicals. 
A good halftone tells half the story. The Review needs good prac- 
tical articles upon "bee subjects," and the value of the article will 
be greatly enhanced providing good photographs are included, illus- 
trating the main features of the subject treated. The Review in 
the future will not not be a literary production, but just a plain, 
practical, helpful magazine — one that you will not hesitate about 
writing for for fear your production will not be scholarly enough 
for publication. If, during the season, you have "got on" to some 
"kink" that has proved helpful to you, tell it to your brother, not 
expecting a reward, and take my word for it you will feel well 
pleased with the results. 

Now a word about the photographs for making the halftones to 
illustrate the Review. They ought to be not smaller than a 5 x ?"" 
in size. The larger the better up to an 8x10". If you have a small 
Anastigmat lens, you can enlarge the photo to the desired size. If 
you use a Rectilinear lens, it ought to be of the 5xT" size or larger 
for best results, so you do not have to enlarge. 

iMake the negative with as much contrast as possible, without 
losing detail. Then finish by using gloss P. O. P. and squeegee. 
If you are used to the camera you will understarid these terms; if 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 343 

not. 3'our photographer will. If you employ a photographer to do 
3'onr work, he will likely tell you that developinr^ paper will do just 
as well, it being easier to work. All cheap work now-a-days is 
done with developing paper. Tell him I said use Gloss Printing 
Out Paper, and tone to a deep purple or black, then squeegee. 

The popular sepia tone, which is very fine in its place, is not 
suitable for halftones. — [Townsend.] 



We Have Moved. 

About June 1, 1912, the last car of bees was moved from Remus, 
Mecosta Co., our old-time address, to Gratiot Co. The car consisted 
of mostly supplies and empty hives, for a considerable number of 
the bees had died during the past cold winter. From now on my 
postoffice address will be Xorthstar, Gratiot Co., Mich., instead of 
Remus, where so many have been in the habit of writing me in the 
past. There ought to be a reason for all things, and there is for 
this move. In the first place, the hone)^ that the bees gather in this 
old, well-cleared location is of a considerably better quality than that 
at the old location. Then we have been getting just as much honey 
here in Gratiot as in Alecosta Co. — some seasons a little more — and 
as the price is always somewhat more for the better grade of honey, 
it is another reason for moving what bees were left up there down 
here. 

We have 350 swarms at our Charlevoix Co. yards that are in 
charge of my oldest son, Delbert. This is our raspberry and willow- 
herb location, and it is a good location, too. Our 700 colonies are 
now grouped in two locations, Charlevoix Co. and Gratiot Co., 
instead of three locations, as in the past. • 

We have a big cellar that we winter our bees in, in Charlevoix 
Co., while these here in Gratiot are wintered, four in a packing case, 
out-of-doors. Thus far the cellar wintered bees have outstripped 
the (lUtside wintered bees. Rut more anon. — [Townsend.] 



Honey Crop Reports. 

In the reports Avhich follow, the first figure will denote the 
number of reports received from the state named ; the second will 
be the number of colonies reported for the spring of 1!)11 ; the third 
will be the num.ber of colonies for the spring of 1912 ; the fourth 
will be the number of pounds of honey produced in 1911; and the 
fifth or last will be the number of pounds of honey reported for 
1912. In some cases the figures for this year are an estimate, as 
the flow was not over when the report was made. This would be 
especially true wdiere there is a fall crop. But where the honey is 
from clover, bassv/ood and raspberry, the figures given are no doubt 
pretty nearly correct. 



344 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



No. Colonies Colonies lbs. Honey lbs. Honey 

Reports Repoited Reported Produced Reporttd 

Received. Spring 1911. Spring 1912. 1911. for 1912. 

Alabama 3 981 981 75,100 45,975 

Arizona 3 1,495 1,482 137,400 109,800 

Arkansas 2 105 180 4.400 900 

California 19 5,548 6,205 416,940 221,400 

Canada 5 298 394 17,100 20,850 

Colorado 1 75 100 7,000 6,000 

Idaho 6 717 715 80,620 73,200 

Illinois 22 1,526 968 27,819 38,931 

Indiana 8 507 419 19,230 30,450 

Iowa 21 1,249 1,098 49,673 76,200 

Massachuselts 2 90 108 26 I.IOU 

Maryland 2 110 101 1,200 2,550 

Michigan 59 4,774 4,524 221,885 242,705 

Minnesota 19 1,138 876 42,355 54,500 

Missouri 10 656 388 10,660 28,385 

Montana 2 65 120 4,500 11,000 

Nebraska 3 142 126 6,200 7,250 

New Jersey 5 142 143 2,320 7,375 

New Mexico 3 508 409 37,000 7,400 

New York 28 3,650 3,931 154.300 19((,75() 

North Carolina .... 3 115 175 7,500 11,000 

Nevada 2 390 419 12,000 15,600 

Ohio 12 492 365 10,715 20,100 

Oklahoma 3 73 65 1,30^9 4,000 

Oregon 2 490 570 22,000 40,000 

Pennsylvania 18 1,075 1,076 48,279 66,525 

South" Dakota 1 31 39 2,000 1,800 

Tennessee 3 147 134 3,000 7,740 

Texas 6 1,411 1,832 58,610 28,045 

Utah 4 880 1,184 24,650 38,000 

Vermont 5 977 972 7,900 31,300 

Virginia 1 100 43 2,000 

Washington 1 49 80 3,000 4,500 

West Virginia 2 170 153 4,000 6,800 

Wisconsin 42 3,001 2,750 109,270 139,360 

Wyoming 1 17 15 3,250 8,000 

This report, while not anywhere near as complete as I would 
like to have it, will yet give you an idea of the crop for this year. 
Had a larg-e per cent of the bee-keepers reported, a much more 
accurate summary could be g-iven. Many reports could not be used 
as they lacked part of the figures. 

You must remember that the last year was an exceedingly poor 
year in the clover belt and, while this year's crop is much better, 
it is not what could be called a heavy crop in the total. Besides, 
the local demand should be much heavier, as the inexperienced bee- 
keeper, the one who influences the local prices, was the one who 
lost heaviest in bees last winter. This will keep much honey from 
the distant markets and will have its efifect on prices. Through 
Michigan at least, buyers are picking up comb honey at from 16' 
cents to 18 cents, and extracted at 9 cents to 10 cents, f. o. b. pro- 
ducer's station. Some lots have been sold lower than this, 1:)ut it 
was earlier in the season before the demand was fully known. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 345 

®t|^ Nattnnal TJ&n-'KnptVB^ Aaanrtattnu 

Knh its iBraurl|pa 

Officers. Directors. 

George W. York, President Sandpoint, Ida. E. D. Townsend, Chairman Remus, Mich. 

MoRLEY Pettit, Vice-Pres. . .Guelph, Ont., Can. J. M. Buchanan Franklin, Tenn. 

E. B. Tyrrell, Secretary Detroit, Mich. Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. 

230 Woodland Ave. J. E. Crane Middlebury, Vt. 

N. E. France, Treas. Gen. Mgr., Plattville, Wis. F. Wilcox Mauston, Wis. 

CTational Branches and Their Secretaries. 

Arizona Honev Exchange N. Michigan — Ira D. Bartlett 

G. M. Frizzell, Tempe, Ariz. East Jordan, Mich. 

Adirondack — H. E. Gray.. Fort Edwards, N.Y. Ohio — Prof. N. E. Shaw, Dept. of Agr 

Colorado — Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. Columbus, Ohio 

Chicago-Northwestern — L. C. Dadant.... O.ntario — P. W. Hodgetts, Parliament Bldg., 

Hamilton, 111. Toronto, Ont., Can. 

Idaho — R. D. Bradshaw Notus, Ida. Oregon — H. Wilson Corvallis, Ore. 

Illinois — Jas. A. Stone. . .Rt. 4, Springfield, 111. Pecos Valley — Henry C. Barron 

Iow.\ — C. L. Pinney Le Mars, Iowa Hagerman, New Mexico 

Indiana— Walter Pouder, 859 Mass. Ave... Twin Falls — C. H. Stimson. .Twin Falls, Ida. 

Indianapolis, Ind. Tennessee — T. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn. 

Missouri — J. F. Diemer Liberty, Mo. Texas — Willis C. Collins, Box 1.54 

Michigan— E. B. Tyrrell, 230 Woodland Goliad, Texas 

Ave., Detroit, Mich. Vermont — P. E. Crane Middlebury, \'t. 

Minnesota — C. E. Palmer, 1024 Miss. St.. Washington — J. B. Ramage 

St. Paul, Minn. Rt. 2, N. Yakima, Wash. 

New Jersey— E. G. Carr New Egypt, N. J. Wisconsin — Gus Dittmer Augusta, Wis. 



Meeting of Kansas Bee-Keepers. 

On Thursday, September 1!', the Kansas bee-keepers will hold a 
meeting at Hutchison. This will be during- the State Fair and we 
urge every one interested in bees to attend. Air. C. P. Dadant, of 
the American Bee Journal, will deliver an address o'a bees. He is 
one of the best authorities on bees in this or any other country. 
The regular annual meeting of the Kansas Bee-Keepers' Association 
will occur in Topeka about January 15, 1913. O. A. Keene, Sec. 



The Summer Field Meeting. 

It is not difficult to get from a dozen to seventy-five bee- 
keepers out to a field day meeting and picnic, such as was held 
July 16 at AA^ashoe, Idaho. Select some interested bee-keeper's 
apiary where plenty of shade is near. Buy t\venty-five or fifty 
postal cards and write to all the bee-keepers you kni)w. Phone to 
others and give notices of the meeting to the newspapers. A set 
program is not necessary. Supering, controlling, swarming, trans- 
ferring, treating foul brood, nailing hives and grading honey, will 
be more subjects than can be handled in one day. 

Give the basket lunch feature special prominence and be sure 
to get out the women and children. Have an exhibit of comb and 
extracted honey so that non-bee-keeping visitors can see what your 
vicinity can produce. Urge the newspaper men to attend and invite 



346 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

everyone. ]\Iany sales of honey can be made at snch a meeting. 
A local bee-keepers' society can be organized if sufificient need is 
felt for it. 

Because a honey producer sells a carload or more of comb 
honey is not sufficient reason why his Avord should be taken too 
seriously on the grading of honey. Se\-eral factors enter into the 
problem. There are a number of large producers who put upon 
the market honey that has a tendenc}^ to curtail further sales. The 
small bee-keepers are not the only slipshod producers and careless 
packers. 

A few carloads of honey weighing twenty pounds to the case 
and up for No. 2, and twenty-four pounds for No. 1, will be shipped 
this year. Leaking, unfinished, poorly scraped and carelessly pro- 
duced honey will make up a part of this honey, and when it reaches 
its destination in the east will disgust the buyers. 

It requires a good bee-keeper to produce honey that will meas- 
ure up to the Colorado rules, which are the only standard, so far 
as I know, in the west. Apparently the we-^tern subscriber, who 
says in the August number that the Colorado rules are a little too 
strict in some ways and not elastic enough as to Aveight, has the 
old rules in mind. The rules, as they now stand, have a "choice" 
grade that admits 12-oz. honey or over. Tlie range of price will 
vary probably lo cents per case from one grade to another. We will 
suppose "No. 2'' to bring $2.75 a case: ''choice" would be worth 
$2.90; "No. 1," $3.05, and "fancy," $3.20. These prices vary with 
*;he quality and general conditions of production. No two producers' 
crops will absolutely approximate each other's in any one season. 

With four grades of comb honey there will not be 25 to 35 
cents' difference between each grade, as the western subscriber 
intimates. They will come together so close that ten cents may 
span the distance. — [Foster.] 



Southern Idaho and Eastern Oregon Branch Field Meeting. 

(Reduced from report in Gem State Rural-Joiirnal.) 

?\Iembers of the South Idaho and East Oregon Bee-Keepers' 
Association, with their families and friends, held a picnic and field 
day at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Dibble, at Washoe, on Tues- 
day, July 16. Some G5 were present and they were not only pleas- 
antly entertained but interested e\ery moment of the time. The 
gathering Avas held under the shade of the apple trees that occupied 
a generous portion of the home acre, and the large apiary of ']\Ir. 
Dibble is also kept in the orchard that forms a considerable part of 
his three-acre tract. This gave the visiting bee-keepers an oppor- 
tunity to get object lessons and discuss the problems of the apiary 
to good advantage. The A'isitors Avere met at the morning train 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 347 

and escorted to the place. Many also came by private conveyance. 

Those who spoke briefly were ^lessrs. A. I. McClanahan. A. E. 
Gipson, '^^^ L. Porter, C. E. Dibble, and Alesdames Paine and 
Dibble. Prof. Wilson, of Oregon, also gave a talk that was 
appreciated. 

About 10,000 colonies of bees were represented at the meeting. 
Several familiar names in the association were absent, including" 
Secretary Bradshaw\ much to the regret of those in attendance. 
Wives of the members were prominently in evidence, and their 
presence, with the graceful service they rendered in the picnic fea- 
tures of the meeting, made the day about as pleasant as it well 
could have been. President Pennington proved himself resourceful 
as a presiding officer, and, while there was no formal program, he 
kept things going in good shape in the absence of Secretary Brad- 
shaw', wdio was reported to ha\e missed the morning train that car- 
ried the members to the meeting. \A\ L. Porter made a strong 
plea for the strict uniform grading of honey by members of the 
association. He fa\'ored adopting the Colorado gradmg rules and 
the use of the double tier shipping case. J. E. Lyon thought we 
would have to come to strict grading rules, although they were 
exacting and sometimes difficult to comply wdth. He liked the 
single tier shipping case as it was cheaper and easier to pack. A. I. 
A'IcClanahan favored the Colorado grading rules and believed the 
association should adopt them. President Pennington thought the 
association should have a committee appointed to report i;^n the 
subject of grading rules and shipping cases, and on motion it was 
voted that the president appoint a committee of six members to 
consider the matter and report upon the same at the winter meeting 
of the association. The committee is to be named later and will 
consist of three members each from Idaho and Oregon. 

Prof. AMI son, of Corvalis, Oregon, made an interesting after- 
dinner talk, during which he said that the bee-keeping industry was 
yet in its infancy. It was destined to grow^ into prominence and 
magnitude. Bee-keepers should not only inform themselves about 
their industry, but should learn to respect each other's rights. He 
referred to the value of the honey bee to the orchardist. and said 
that practically all the orchards around Corvalis this year were 
fertilized by the bees. The honey output of Oregon, he said, was 
probably close to a quarter of a million dollars. He strongly urged 
strict grading rules and believed there should be "Fancy" Xo. 1 
and No. 2, and possibly "Extra Fancy" grades. Fruit, he said, that 
has been cross-fertilized was the best. Prof. Wilson spoke highly 
for the outlook of the region covered by the South Idaho and East 
Oregon ^A.sociation, and said it certainly had a great future. 

The consensus of those present w^as that the bees were going 
to make good this year, and, while the first part of the season had 



348 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

been rather cool for much honey storing, the weather at the time 
of the meeting, and a few days preceding it, was all that could be 
desired. Some were especially optimistic and were willing to fore- 
cast records this year in some of the apiaries. 

The Farthing Bros., of \\'eiser, were among the heaviest bee- 
keepers present, representing about 1,100 colonies. They will 
become valuable and active members of the association. 



Constitution of the National Bee-Keepers' Association. 

[Read over this constitution and serid in your proposed changes to it so they 
can be published in the November number.) 

Article I. — Na:me. 
This organization shall be known as the National Bee-Keepers' 
Association. 

Article II. — Object. 
The object of this Association shall be to aid its members in the 
business of bee-keeping; to help in the sale of their honey and bees- 
wax, and to promote the interest of bee-keepers in any other direc- 
tion decided upon by the Board of Directors. 

Article III. — Plan of Organization. 

This organization shall consist of one central organization with 
its various branches. These branches may be in any locality where 
twenty-five or more members of the National Association decide to 
form a branch. 

Article W . — MEMBERSHir. 

Section 1. Membership shall be extended to any person inter- 
ested in bee-keeping, and who is in accord with the purposes and 
aims of this Association. The annual membership fee shall be $1.50, 
one-third or fifty cents of which shall go into the fund of the local 
treasury where such a branch is maintained. 

Sec. 2. Wherever a local bee-keepers' association shall decide 
to unite with this Association, it will be received upon payment by 
the local secretary of one dollar ($1.00) per member per annum to 
the Secretary ; but all active members of such local association must 
become members in order to take advantage of this provision. 

Sec. 3. Membership in the National Association will begin Jan- 
uary 1st each year. Those joining previous to September 1st will be 
credited paid to January 1st following. Those uniting after Septem- 
ber 1st will be credited paid one year from January 1st following. 

Article V. — National Meeting. 
Section i. The National Meeting shall consist of delegates 
dulv elected bv tlie various branches. These meetings shall occur 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 349 

during' the month of February, the exact date and place to be de- 
cided by the Board of Directors. 

Sfx". 2. Each Branch shall be entitled to elect one delegate to 
attend the National fleeting, who shall present proper credentials, 
and, if correct, such delegate shall be entitled to one vote for every 
fifty members or fraction thereof in this local Branch. 

Sec. 3. At the annual meeting the delegates may hold one or 
more sessions open to JDce-keepers for the consideration of such spe- 
cial or general topics as the Board of Directors may decide upon. 

Article \'1. — Officers axd Duties. 

Sectiox 1. The officers of this Association shall be a President, 
Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer-General ^lanager. These 
ofificers shall be elected at each annual meeting of delegates and 
serve for one year, or until their successors are elected and qualified. 

Sec. 2. The President shall preside at each annual m.eeting of 
delegates, and at any special meeting which may i)e called. He 
shall also preside at all meetings of Directors and perform any other 
duties which may devolve upon the presiding officer. 

Sec. 3. The A'ice-President shall perform the President's duties 
in his absence. 

Sec. 4. The Secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings 
of the annual meeting, maintain a list of all members of the Associa- 
tion, with their addresses, collect, receipt and pay over to the Treas- 
urer-General Manager all dues and membership fees; keep a proper 
record of all business transactions, and perform such other duties as 
may be required of him by the Association or Directors. 

Sec. 5. The Treasurer-General Manager shall care for the funds 
of the Association, depositing the same in such depository as may 
be approved by' the Directors. He shall also pay such orders com- 
ing to him as may bear the signature of the one authori;?:ed by the 
Directors to draw orders. 

Article \TI. — Board of Directors and Their Duties. 

Sec. 1. At each Annual Meeting of Delegates, in addition to 
the officers named in Article VI., there shall be elected a Board of 
live Directors. (For the 3'ear 191,2 the Officers and Board of Direc- 
tors shall be elected at the regular ballot election of the Association, 
to serve until their successors are elected bv a meeting of delegates.) 

Sec. 2. These Directors shall care for the business of the Asso- 
ciation between the Annual ^Meetings. They shall have full super- 
vision of the work of the officers elected, and shall have power to 
remove from office any Officer or Director not acting in accordance 
with the Constitution and By-Laws of the Association. 

Sec. 3. The Board of Directors shall decide upon the compen- 
sation of the various officers, authorizing the amounts so decided 
upon to be paid from the general treasury. 



350 THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 

Sec. 4-. The Board of Directors shall have power to elect a 
General Organizer, whose duty it shall be to promote the organiza- 
tion of Branches throughout the United States and Canada. They 
shall also decide as to his compensation. 

Article ATII. — Organizatiox of Branches. 

Section 1. Local Branches may be established in any locality, 
but not interfering with a Branch alread}^ established, whene^"er the 
membership in that locality so desires. 

Sec. 2. — A Local Branch shall consist of not less than twenty- 
five members. 

Sec. T). a Local Bee-Keepers' Association already established 
may become a Branch by a majority ^'ote of its members, either by 
mail or at a meeting, and accepting" the Constitution and By-Laws 
of this Association. 

Article IX. — Amendments. 
Section L This Constitution may be amended at any regular 
meeting of Delegates by a two-thirds vote of Delegates present and 
voting, provided that at least ninety days' notice of the proposed 
amendment be given to the Secretaries of the Branches. 

Article X. — Rules of Order. 

Roberts' Rules of Order shall govern all meetings of both the 
N^ational and Branch organizations. 



Bee-Keepers of Oklahoma, Attention ! 

Please place the date of Tuesday evening, October 1, in your 
minds in such a position that it will not be forgotten. At that time, 
in the Apiary building- at the State P^air Grounds in Oklahoma City, 
there will be a meeting that all should attend. Some work looking 
to the interests of the industry has been done, but more is much 
needed. AVe must have the support of those interested to accom- 
plish more. \Ye have not been getting the support necessary. If 
3^ou have not been seeing the display of Oklahoma honey shown at 
this Fair, 3-ou have no idea of its magnificence. It will likely be as 
good or better this }ear than ever before. It has been the practice 
of the Fair management to throw the grounds open in the evening 
and admission is free. I presume this will be done this year. Come 
and treat yourself to the sight of a fine hone}' display, and at the 
same time gi\'e encouragement to the industrv in which you are 
interested. 

It is hoped to present a program of more than usual interest. 

N. Fred Gardiner. President, 

Oklahoma B)ee-Keepers' Association. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



351 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 




FANCY 



NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey, IGc to 
17c. No. 1 white comb honey, 15c to 16c. 
Fancy white extracted honey, 10c to lie. 
Light amber extracted honey, 9c to 10c. Am- 
ber, 8c to 9c. Wax, 30c. 

BLAKE-LEE CO.. 
Aug. 20. 4 Chatham Row. 



KANSAS CITY, MO.— The receipts of 
both comb and extracted honey are light, es- 
pecially comb honey. We are selling our re- 
ceipts of comb honey as fast as they arrive, 
at quotations. We quote: No. 1 white comb, 
2-t section cases, $.3.50; No. 2 white comb, 24 
sectioh cases, $3.00 to $3.25; No. 1 amber, 24 
section cases, $3.25; No. 2 amber, 24 section 
casts, $3.00; extracted white, per lb., 8c to 
S'/zc; extracted amber, per lb., 7c ■ to 8c; bees- 
wax, per lb., 25c to 28c. 

C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 

Aug. 20. 

CINCINNATI — There has been some new 
honey arrived and is selling slow from 14 to 
16 cents, according to grade and quantity. 
There seems to be considerable honey offered. 
There is only a fair demand for extracted 
honey, white bringing 9c to 9J^c, light amber 
in barrels 7c, in cans 8c to S^c. Beeswax 
sellling slow at $33 per hundred. The above 
are our selling prices, not what we are paying. 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 

Aug. 19. 



CINCINNATI — New comb honey is arriv- 
ing, and in order to consume the great crop 
of this section of the country there must be a 
lower range of prices than last year. We are 
selling choice comb honey at from 13c to 16c 
per lb., according to the quality and quantity 
purchased; extracted at 6^c to 7V2C for am- 
ber, and 8^<c to 10c for good to fancy ex- 
tracted honey. The above are our selling 
prices, not buj-ing prices. For choice bright 
yellow beeswax we are paying 2Sc per lb. de- 
livered here, in cash, or 30c per lb. in trade. 
THE FRED W. MUTH CO.. 

"The pusy Bee Men," 

Aug. 6. 51 Walnut Street. 



CHICAGO — Comb honey has sold promptly 
upon arrival during the month and up to this 
date there is none that has been on the mar- 
ket beyond the time necessary to get it in 
shape to sell. The price ranges from 17c to 
18c per lb. for No. 1 to fancy white. There 
has not been much inquiry for the amber 
grades and practically none are offered. Ex- 
tracted is without change, but is not active. 
For clover and basswood in the 60 lb. tin 
cans, sales are made at 9c to 10c per lb. Am- 
ber grades range from 7c to 8c per lb. Bees- 
wax remains unchanged at from 30c to 32c 
per lb. if free from sediment and other for- 
eign matter. 

R. A. BURNETT & CO., 

Aug. 21. 173 W. South Water St. 



NEW YORK — New crop comb honey is in 
good demand and receipts are gradually get- 
ting larger, and will continue so from now on. 
Fancy white sells at 15c per lb., with some 
exceptionally fine stock at 16c; No. 1 at 14c 
per lb.; No. 2 at 13c per lb., and amber at 12c 
per lb. No buckwheat on the market as yet, 
and we do not expect any for ten days or two 
weeks from now. Extracted in fair demand 
at Syic to 9c per lb, for white clover, 7^^c to 
Sc for fancy light amber, and 7c to 7J'jc for 
amber. No change in beeswax. 



Aug. 21. 



HILDRETH & SEGELKEN, 

265-267 Greenwich St. 



TOLEDO— Replying to your letter of July 
29th, beg to advise that there is little doing in 
the honey biisiness at the presery; time, very 
little old honey left, and no new coming in, 
and so far no prices have been made, every 
one waiting to see how the new crop is going 
to turn out. Fancy New Comb Honey would 
bring m a retail way 17 to 18c per lb.; No. 1, 
16 to 17c per lb.; extracted white clover, 8}i 
to 10c per lb., depending on color, quality, etc. 
Beeswax is selling at from 32 to 35c. The 
above are our selling prices, and not what 
we are paying. 

July 30. S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 



352 



THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 



DENVER, COL.— Old crop comb honey all 
sold. We expect the first of the new crop by 
the middle of July if weather conditions are 
favorable. We have a good stock of very fine 
extracted honey which we are quoting in a 
jobbing way at 9c for strictly white, 8c for 
light amber, 6fi to lYzc for strained. We 
pay 26c in cash and 28c in trade per lb. for 
clean yellow beeswax delivered at Denver. 
Yours very truly, 
THE COLORADO HONEY 

PRODUCERS' ASSN. 
June 2o. F. Rauchfuss, Manager. 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be inserted in tliis depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minivnini 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
ad't'ertisement in this department. 



BEES AND QUEENS. 



Golden Italian Queens^ Nuclei, and full 
colonies. See price-list in May Review, page 
197. Isaac F. Tillinghast, Factoryville, Pa. 

A Limited Number of Leather Colored Ital- 
ian Oueens for Sale. Warranted purely mated, 
$1.50. Geo. B. Howe, Black River, N. Y. 

Front Line Italian Queens by return mail 
at 75c each, 6, $4.25; 12, $8.00; 25 and up, 
60c each. J. B. Hollopeter, Pentz, Pa. 

Italian Queens. — Three band strain only. 
Tested $1.00 each; Untested $0.75; $7.00 per 
dozen. No disease. Send for price list. 

J. W. K. Shaw & Co., Loreauville, La. 

Golden Italian Queens — Untested, war- 
ranted $1.00 each; six for $4.50; twelve for 
$8.00. Good reports where tried for Black 
brood. J. B. Case, Port Orange, Fla. 

Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 

Queens. — Mott's strain of Italians and Car- 
niolans. Bees by pound, nuclei. Ten-page list 
free. Plans for Introducing Queens, 15 cts. ; 
How to Increase, 15 cts.; both, 25 cts. E. E. 
Mott, Glenwood, Mich. 

Carniolan Queens. — Bred from best im- 
ported stock. Many colonies can be manip- 
ulated without the use of smoke or veil. Un- 
tested, one for $.75, six for $4.25, twelve for 
$8.00. 'lested, one for $1.00, six for $5.00, 
twelve for $10.00. William Kernan, Dushore, 
Pa., R. D. 2. 

Our Golden Queens produce beautiful 
golden bees, that are great honey gatherers and 
very gentle, and our leather colored will please 
you. (Government inspection). C. W. 

Phelps & Son, 3 Wilcox St., Binghampton, 
N. Y. 



Golden and 3-Banded Italians. — lasted, $1 
each. 3 (queens $2.75; 6 or more, 85c each. 
Untested, 75c each; 3 queens, $2; 6 or more, 
Ooc each. Bees per pound, $1. Nuclei, per 
frame, $1.25. (No disease here.) C. B. 
Bankston, Buffalo, Texas. 

Golden Queens. — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, golden 
to tip queens, that should produce golden to tip 
workers, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also nuclei 
and full colonies. Send for circular and price 
list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., Phila- 
delphia, Penna. 

If you wish the best of untested three- 
banded Italian queens send us your orders — 
75 cents each, $8.00 per dozen. Safe arrival 
and saiisfaction. No order too small nor too 
large to receive our prompt attention. The 
Golden Rule Bee Co., Rt. 1, Box 103, River- 
side, Cal. 



HONEY AND WAX. 



Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water bi., Chicago. 

Wanted — Glassed comb and clover extract- 
ed honey and beeswax. John O. Buseman, 
2S2S Germantown Ave., Philadelpnia, Pa. 

Extracted Honey of the finest quality — 
thick well ripened, flavor simply delicious. 
White clover and sweet clover blend. Price 
9c per pound in bright new 60 lb. cans. Sam- 
ple free. J. P. Moore, Morgan, Ky. 

Wanted. — White or very light amber ex- 
tracted or comb honey at once. O. N. Bald- 
win, Baxter Springs, Kans. 

We call on a large number of retail grocers 
each week, and can place your surpus honey. 
Write The New Idea Co., 545 Orange St., 
Newark, N. J. 

Honey For Sale — In 60-lb. cans, 2 in a 
case. White, Sc; Amber, "lYzc; Buckwheat, 7c, 
f. o. b. here. Sample, 10c. Robert Conn, 
Roaring Branch, Pa. 

For Sale — The best comb and extracted, 
willowherb, raspberry, white clover and bass- 
wood honey. Prices nuoted on application. E. 
Woodall, Goodman, Wis. 

A very fine quality of white extracted 
honey for table use, in new 60-lb. tin cans. 
Raspberry or Basswood flavors. Say how much 
you can use and we will be pleased to quote 
our prices. Sample free for a 4c stamp to pay 
the postage. E. D. Townsend & Sons, North- 
star, Mich. 

Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. PIildreth & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

For Sale — Finest quality white clover and 
basswood honey, blended in extractor. Put up 
in brand new 60-lb. cans, two cans per case, 
at 10c per lb. bv case of two cans, or more, 
F. O. B. Flint'. Cash with order. L. S. 
Griggs, 711 Avont St., Flint, Mich. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



353 



Misci:i<i>ANi:ous. 



In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton, Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 



Aluminum Hive Numbers (1^-in. high") 9c 
each Fig. 50 or more lyic. Postpaid, incl. 
brass nails. Henry Benke, Pleasantville Sta., 
N. Y. 

Watch for Dr. Chas. G. Schamu's adver- 
tisement in November issue. Sold out now. 
A new announcement then. 



Special Offers in Bee Literature, etc. 
Good locations for bees in new and unoccu- 
pied territory. Send for free circular. 
George W. York, Sandpoint, Idaho. 

For Sale. — -A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 

For Sale. — New 60-lb. cans, two in a case, 
lots of 10 cases, 60c each; 25 cases, 59c each. 
50 cases 58c each, 100 cases 57c each, F. 
O. B. factory in O. or 111. Quotations fur- 
nished on anything in cans; give quantity 
wanted. Large contracts enable us to make 
low prices. A. G. Woodman Co., Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 



REAIi ESTATE. 

For Sale — One 20-acre farm and 130 swarms 
of bees in Wisconsin's best land and honey 
locality. Lewis Francisco, Mosinee, Wis. 

Wanted — Small California property in good 
bee locality, or will work on shares or for sal- 
ary. State full proposal in first letter. Jacob 
Probst, Florence, Burl Co., N. J. 



POULTRY. 



Pigeons! Pigeons! — Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
our specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 



WHITE SWEET CLOVER SEED. 

We have been requested to furnish our 
members with white sweet clover seed, and we 
are just arranging with parties in Colorado to 
furnish us with what our members want. The 
need of getting this seed from good reliable 
sources is apparent, and we are pleased to 
assure you that the parties who are furnishing 
it are absolutely reliable, and will furnish the 
best seed obtainable. Orders will be taken for 
not less than 10 pounds, at 15c per pound. 
Transportation charges will have to be paid by 
the purchaser. State how you want it shipped 
when sending in your order. 

THE NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSN. 

230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. 

488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 

in 

Hoiiey, neesT«-ax, niaple Sugar and 

Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 



"Grig-gs Saves you Preig'lit." 

TOLEDO 

Is the best shipping center for vour 
honey crop. We handle vast quantities 
of 

Comb and Extracted Honey 

Write us what you have; will buy 
any quantity if price is right, or will 
handle on a commission. Also want to 
correspond with shippers of Potatoes, 
Apples, and other Produce. 

S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 

26 N. Erie St. 



Comb vs. Extracted Honey. 

{Continued from page jjS) 

This will not apply to the man who has a ready market near 
home at a good price. Each producer must decide this question 
lor himself. I have run bees in seven counties in three states dur- 
ing the last five years, managing more than one thousand colonies 
most of the time, so have had some experience. I would like to 
help put on the brake to raising more extracted honey and encourage 
comb honey production in the irrigated west at least. 

Logan, Utah. 



354 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Why Not REAR Your Own QUEENS? 

Doolittle's "Scientific Queen-Rearing" and tine ^ <f ^\^\ 
American Bee Journal for 1912 — Both for Only ^^JLa^#^# 

Every Bee-Ueeper Should Have Both Book and 
Bee-Paper. 

DOOLITTLE'S "Scientific Queen-Rearing" booli 
contains 126 pages, and is bound in leatherette 
with! round corners. It tells in the clearest 
way possible just how the famous queen-breeder, 
Mr. G. M. Doolittle, rears the best of queen-bees 
in perfect accord with Nature's way. It is for 
both amateur and veteran in bee-keeping. As all 
know, Mr. Doolittle has spent some 40 years in 
rearing queens and producing honey. He has no 
superior as a queen-breeder. You can learn to rear 
fine queens by following his directions. Read up 
now before the bee season is here. 

You will not regret having this book, which also 
gives his management of the bees for the produc- 
tion of honey. 

The book, and the American Bee Journal for 
1!)12, for only $1.00, is certainly a big: bargain for 
you. Send the $1.00 now, and we will begin your 
subscription with January 1, 1912. and mail you 
this book. Sample copy of the Bee Journal free. 





Address 

AMERICAN BEE JOURNAL, 



HAMILTON. ILL. 



PORTER BEE ESCAPE 




TIME 



SAVES 
HONEY 



MONEY 



15c eaeli, $1.G5 do/,. All Dealers. 

Ulanjifactured only by 

R. & E. C. PORTER, Lewistown, 111. 



SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufacturing Sedions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 
CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 



FOR SALE. 

Honey Bees, Ouecns, Extracted White 
Clover and Fall Honey, in quantities 
and packages to suit retail trade. Fifty 
colonies Pure Italians, one story, 8- 
frame, $4.00; 10-frame, $.5.00. Queens, 
guaranteed, 75c; dozen, $6.00. 
Apiaries of 

J. H. HAUGHEY, 
Berrien Springs, Mich. 



THE 



SWARTHMORE APIARIES 

The late E. L. Pratt's Celebrated Gentle 

GOLDEN ALL OVER QUEENS 

PEIDIOREEO 

PENN G. SNYDER, State Apiary Inspector 
SWARTHMORE, PA. 



PROTECTION HIVE 

The best and lowest priced double wall hive on the market. This hive has Ji mate- 
rial in the outer wall, and is not cheaply constructed of 5'8 material as some other hives 
on the market. Packing or dead air spaced as you prefer. Remember winter is approach- 
ing. Get your bees into comfortable quarters before it is here. Send for a catalogue. 

/^. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids. Mich. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



355 




"If goods are wanted quick, send to Pouder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections, Foundation, Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
My equipment, my stock of goods, the quahty of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 
excelled. 

PAPER HONEY JARS (Sample Mailed Free) 
For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis, Ind. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 



Michiaan H 



igan i loney 
Wanted 



We buy heavily every year. 
Have dealt with a good many 
members of the Michigan As- 
sociation. Cash paid. Write us 
at once, stating what you have, 
how put up, and price. 



F. P. Reynolds & Co. 

Woodbridge and Griswold Sts., 
DETROIT, MICH. 



WANTED 



Extracted Honey 



I buy directly from the beekeepers 
and sell it directly to consumers, and 
am therefore always in a position to 
pay you the best price for your honey. 

It will therefore pay you before you 
sell your crop to send me samples of 
the different grades of honey you have 
and the amount you have of each kind 
and how put up, and quote me the 
price you ask for each kind delivered 
in Preston. I pay cash on arrival of 
goods. 



M. V. FACEY 

FRESTON, FII.I.MORE CO., 

MINN. 




Make Your Own Hives 

Ree Keepers will save money by using our Foot 

"^ SAWS 

in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 

384 Ruby Street, Rockford, Illinois. 



356 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 



WANTED 

NEW CROP 

HONEY 



Both Comb and 
Extracted 

Are you looking for a market? New 
York is as good as any. We handle on 
commission and buy outright. Write 
us before disposing of your honey. 



Hildreth & Segelken 

'JiS7i-'-(i~ Gret'nMU'll .St. 
>E\V VOUIv CITY, N. V. 



Golden Italian 

QUEENS 

That produce golden bees of the bright- 
est kind. Brother queen buyers, I have 
a strain of Goldens that cannot be beat- 
en in honey gathering, gentleness, pro- 
lificness and color. I know you have 
all seen the articles written against the 
Goldens, but I would like to send those 
who are trying to run down the Gold- 
ens a queen of my stock. I will guar- 
antee my stock to equal any breed of 
honey bees, and superior to many. Now 
if you want a good queen to breed 
from next season, send to me. I have 
untested at $1.00, tested $2.00, breed- 
ers. $5.00 to $10.00. To all who men- 
tion the "Review" I will deduct 25% 
off each queen. 



J. B. BROCKWELL 
Barnetts, Va. 



MARSHFIELD 
GOODS 

Are made right in the timber 
coimtrj', and we have the best 
facilities for shipping; DIRECT, 
QUICK and LOW RATES. 

Sections are made of the best 
yoimg basswood timber, and per- 
fect. 

Hives and Shipping Cases are 
dandies. 

Ask for our catalogue of sup- 
plies free. 



MARSHFIELD MFG. CO. 
Marshfield, Wis. 



Raspberry 



H 



oney... 



Our crop of raspberry honey this year 
is very fine. It is the best in quality 
I ever saw. It was all left on the 
hives until it was all thoroughly sealed 
and ripened by the bees. It is thick, 
rich and delicious. It is put up in 
new 60 lb. tin cans. Price $6.00 per 
can. A large sized sample by mail for 
10 cents. The 10 cents may be applied 
on any order sent for honey. 



ELMER HUTCHINSON, 
Pioneer, Mich. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



357 



QUEENS OF 

MOORE'S STRAIN 

OF ITALIANS 

PRODUCE WORKERS 

That fill the supers quick 
■\Vith honey nice and tliiclv. 



They have won a world-wide rep- 
utation for honey-gathering, liard- 
iness gentleness, etc. 

Untested aueens, $1.00; six, 
$5.00; 12, $9.00. 

Select untested, $1.25; six, $G.00 
12. $11.00. 

Safe arrival and satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

Circular free. 



J. P. MOORE 

Queen Breeder, 
Route 1, Morgan, Ky. 



This is the only place 
in Indiana where you 
can get Lewis Beeware, 
Dadant's Foundation, 
Bingham Smokers, and 
Prompt Shipment. 

Indianapolis is the greatest inland 
railroad center in the world, both steam 
and interurban. This helps us to give 
better service in receiving and shipping 
to all points. Orders are shipped same 
day received and no order is too small 
to receive prompt attention. 

Wanted: Comb and Extracted Honey, 
Beeswax. Catalog free. 



The C. M. Scott Co. 

1004 E. Wasliington St., 
INBIANAFOIiIS, INDIANA. 



Bee -Keepers 



I will be in the market for 
large quantities of 

(clover and iDasswood 



Honey 



Again serve your own interests. 

Send me a sample and get my 

offer before you make a 

mistake. 



H. C Ahlers 

West Bend, Wis. 



SATISFACTORY 

RESULTS 

Will be obtained by using MANU- 
FACTURED COMB FOUNDATION, 
which embodies PURITY, TOUGH- 
NESS, TRANSPARENCY, COLOR and 
the PURE BEES WAX ODOR of the 
NATURAL COMB as made by the 
HONEY BEE. 



SUCH IS THE 

DITTMER PROCESS 
COMB FOUNDATION 

Send for Samples. 

All other Bee Keepers' Supplies at 
prices you will appreciate. We will be 
pleased to send you our 1912 Catalog, 
for the asking. 



Gus Dittmer Co. 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 



358 THE BEE-KEEPERS REVIEW 



Honey for Sale 



The "National' Takes Its First Step In Bringing Buyer and Pro- 
ducer Together, at Not One Cent Cost to Either. Car Lots Handled as 
Well as Ton Lots. Honey From Clover, Basswood, Raspberry, Sage, iVles- 
quit, Buckwheat, Alfalfa — In Fact, From Every Source From Which the 
Bees Gather It. We Have Talked Enough. The Time For Action is at 
Hand. Read the Following Carefully: 

We have talked for a long time about the National doing something 
to help the producer get a better price for his honey. So far it has been 
mostly talk. But at ihe ^Directors' meeting last January it was decided 
to take such steps as were possible this year. I laid before the Directors 
a plan to establish selling agencies in several of the principal cities. 
That plan was approved by the Directors, but for certain reasons, which 
will be explained to the delegates next February, it was impossible to 
put the plan in operation this fall. 

But We Are Going to Sell Honey Just the Same. 

Honey crop reports have come to me from all over the United States 
and Canada. Alter giving them careful study I believe that good well- 
ripened clover and raspberry extracted honey, in 60-lb. cans, should 
bring the producer not less than 9 cents, f. o. b. his station. The same 
grade of comb honey, the best, should bring not less than IG cents. Not 
being" acquainted with western markets and western honey, I am unable 
to say how much it should bring, but western bee-keepers can form some 
opinion, after considering the prices given above. 

Buyers and Producers Should Write Me at Once. 

Every producer ^^ho has honey for sale should write me just as scon 
as he reads this notice. Eon't wait until tomorrow, for I must know 
what you have at once if I am to help you sell it. Slend me a small 
sample if it is extracted honeJ^ Whether it is comb or extracted, tell 
me all about your crop. I want to know how much you have for sale, 
how it is put up, how much you want for it — in fact, everything about it. 
Then I will put that information on a card, and that card Avill be filed 
so I can refer to it instantly. Now you mustn't stop then, but you must 
try just as hard to sell your honey as though I wasn't trying with you. 
If I can sell your honey it won't cost you a single penny for my trouble. 

Every honey buyer should write me his wants at once. Tell me just 
how much, what kind, and what price you expect to pay. In other words, 
make me an offer for what you want. Or, if you don't want to do that, 
tell me what you want anywaJ^ and let me make you an offer. With the 
information I should have I ought to be able to place you in communi- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 359 



cation with the producer who has just what you desire, and who is the 
nearest to you, thus saving freiglit. Don't you see how this plan should 
work out to the mutual advantage of both buyer and seller? What I do 
won't cost you anything either. 

Did You Think We Were After You, Mr. Buyer? 

Not if you are an honest buyer, willing to paj' the market price for 
what the producer has. But if you are one of those fellows who wants 
to "skin" the producer, then we are after you, and we'll get you too. 
What we are trying to do is to bring buyer and producer closer together. 
We don't want you to pay more than the market price, and we don't want 
some uninformed producer to sell to your competitor at less than you 
have to pay. Neither do we want producers selling at retail at whole- 
sale prices. But so long as this selling business is run each man for 
himself, just so long will those conditions exist. How much easier for you 
to write me just what you want, and let me tell you the name of the 
producer who has it. Will you do it? 

This Will Be Done Absolutely Free to You. 

In order that this transaction may be entirely free from the suspicion 
of "graft," I am going to conduct it so I couldn't get a "rake off" if I 
wanted to. Buyer and seller will be placed in direct communication with 
each other, and will close the deal direct. Mr. Buyer writes me that he 
wants so many tons of such and such honey. Referring to my cards I tind 
that Mr. Producer has exactly what he wants for sale. The proper infor- 
mation is given and my part of the transaction is done. If the buyer has 
no rating, honey should either be paid for before shipping, or shipped sight 
draft attached to bill of lading. Your bank will explain fully. Or if the 
buyer does not wish to send cash direct to the producer, he can send it to 
me to be held until honey has been received and found to be just as pro- 
ducer represented it to be. 

What I Can Offer Now. 

Unless sold before you get this Review, I can offer you one car of 
alfalfa extracted honey, 60 lb. cans, 2 in a case, at $8.00 per case f. o. b. 
Idaho. Can offer 460 cases same as above, gathered from mesquit, polo 
verde. and alfalfa, rather dark, at 6 cts. f. o. b. Arizona. Have 15 or 20 
tons extracted raspberry honey, New York State, at 9 cts. Have some 
Michigan extracted hone}', clover, raspberry, etc., at 9 cts. to 10 cts. Have 
plenty of other lots, both comb and extracted, but no prices. However, will 
get you what you want, if I can. 

If you have honey for sale, or want to buy honey, it will pay you to 
write me the same day you read this. 

Yours truly. E. B. TYRRELL, 
230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Mich, Secretary N. B. K. A., 



360 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



This Can for 20 ds., in Crates of 50. 

F.O.B. Detroit. 




For this same can, packed two in 
a box, the price is 60c per box. 
Note the paneled sides, the inner 
seal, and remember the tin is heavy. 
Size of can, 9% square by 1 3^8 
inches high, with 1 ^ inch cork 
lined, inner seal, screw cap. 



TtiisPait for 6y4 cfs., in Crates of 100. 

F.O.B. Detroit 



A friction top pail. Put in the 
honey, push down the cover, and you 
have no leakage. Size of pail, 6^3 
inches in diameter by 7 inches h:gh. 

Holds 10 lbs. Honey 




Write for descriptive circular giving 
full particulars, prices, and freight 
rates, to 

The National Bee-Keepers' Association 

230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Mich. 




/ No 



No. 51 



No. 52 



No. 53 



v.. 



Glass Packages 

For Honey. 

According to instructions given by the Board of Directors, we have 
made ari'angements with one of the largest glass manufacturers to fur- 
nish our members with glass packages this year. Only four sizes were 
selected, and it is hoped that as large orders will be sent in as possible, 
for what we do this year will determine whether we can get even better 
arrangements next year. On car lots either for these tour sizes or for 
any special size, write and we will see if we can get you a still closer 
price. 

No. 50 Jar holds one pound of honey. Has tin screw cap. Packed 2 
dozen in a corrugated paper case, at 85c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. 

No. 51 Jar holds % of a pound of honey. Tin screw cap. Packed 2 
dozen in a corrugated paper case, at 65c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. 

No. 52 Jellie, holds Vz pound of honey. Tin cap. Packed 2 dozen in 
a corrugated paper case, at 40c per case. Packed 4 dozen in a case 
at 70c per case, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. Per barrel, 13c per dozen, plus 
50c for the barrel. 

No. 53 Squat Jellie, holds % pound honey. Tin cap. Packed only in 
cases holding 6 dozen, at 90c per case, or by the barrel at 13c per 
dozen, plus 50c for the barrel, F. O. B. Pittsburgh. A barrel holds 
from 20 to 25 dozen jellies. 

Be sure and send in your orders in plenty of time, sending cash with 
the same. These prices for members and subscribers only. 

THE NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSOCIATION, 

230 Woodland Ave., DETROIT, MICH. 




ROOT'S 

BEEKEEPERS 
SUPPLIES 




You may have a catalog of supplies; but if you haven't ours for 1912 you have missed 
something really worth while, and should get one at once. It is the largest and most complete 
ever published — more than a mere price list of supplies — a book that every beekeeper can read 
with pleasure and profit. Beginners will find answers to many perplexing questions, and ad- 
vanced beekeepers timely suggestions that will save them money. Old customers are writing us 
frequently letters like the following: 

Your catalog for 1912, designated ROOT'S BEEKEEPERS' SUPPLIES, is received, 
and I certainly thank you for this book. I have had your catalog on my desk for 
years, _ and have used Root's supplies all along. I note the enlargement and improve- 
ment in your new catalog, and notice many things I expect to add to my apiary. 

Crystal City, Texas. C. W. Cox. 

Our catalog this season also gives a full and complete list of books and booklets which we 
can supply. Many of these booklets are free, which doesn't mean that they are not worth read- 
ing, but simply that we want you to be informed on the subjects of which they treat. Send for a 
catalog, and check those in which you are interested. 



Quick Deliveries 



Next to having the best goods made, there is nothing so important to the beekeeper in the 
busy season as to have goods delivered just when they are wanted most. It isn't always possible 
to ship goods from a distant factory and have them reach destination within a day or two, as 
is sometimes necessary during the height of the season, but with distributing-houses located in 
the large shipping-centers we are able to supply beekeepers everywhere, with no loss of time 
and with minimum transportation charges. 



Send Your Hurry Orders 



to any one of the offices listed below, and let us show you what we can do for you in point of 
service. Cars are going to these branches at the rate of two or three a week, so the stocks are 
new and fresh, and we usually have just what you want. If it isn't in stock at your nearest 
branch our manager will include your order with his specifications and you may have your goods 
come in the next car, thereby saving on transportation charges and getting the goods in better 
shape than you would by local freight. 



Whatever Your Wants 



we can supply you, and, of course, there is no question about the quality of our goods. The 
name "ROOT" in connection with bee-supplies means the best of every thing in this line, and 
the best is always the cheapest, as our customers will testify. If you have never used our 
supplies you should make a trial of them this season. Once used, we are sure you will want 
no other. 

I have just received my goods, order No. 10,739. I ai.i more than pleased with 
them. I had intended to make my hives, but when I received the sample hive and saw 
the No. 1 pine lumber from which it was made, and considering the workmanship, I am 
satisfied I can buy cheaper than .^ can make them; enough cheaper to save the price of 
the lumber. 0. C. Mills, Barton Ldg., Vt. 

BRANCH OFFICIIS 

New York, 139-141 Franklin St. Chicagro, 213-231 Institute Place 

Philadelphia, 8-10 'Vine St. Des Moines, 565 'W. Seventh St. 

St. Paul, 1024 Mississippi St. Syracuse, 1631 Genesee St. 

"Washing-ton, 1100 Maryland Ave. S-'W. 
Mechanic Falls, Maine 



Distributing' Depots in Mai:y 
Iiarg-e Centers 

The A. I. Root Company 

Executive Offices and Factory 

MEDINA, OHIO 





THE CHAS. F, MAY CO., PHINTEBS. DETHOIT,! 







Published Mont% 




OCT. 
1912 

DETROIT 
MICHIGAN 



ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR 



Going to buy 

a Motor Car ? 



Then you want 
to know about 
the Cartercar— 



F"irst of all bear in mind that the 
Cartercar is not a gear car ! It ha^ 
no gears ami none uf the geai 
drawbacks. 

The usual complicated gear trans- 
mission is replaced by the patented: 
Friction Transmission. This hai 
only two unit parts — making tho 
Cartercar far more reliable and eas- 
ier to drive. 

And besides, the Cartercar wih 
easily climb a 50% grade with a f uL 
load. It will also run thru mud and 
sand where other cars are helpless. 
The reason is simple — because there 
is no waste power — no weakening of 
the drive through ten or twelve in- 
tricate gears. 



And you have an unlimited number 
of speeds, from nothing up to about 
forty or fifty miles per hour. Com- 
pare' this with the three forward 
and one reverse of the gear ma- 
chine. 

Then, with the three independent 
systems of brakes, the Cartercar is 
safe at all times for ladies and 
young or old people to drive. The 
very simple construction and easy 
control make the Cartercar delight- 
ful for everyone to drive. 

And this Friction Transmissios 
prevents jerks and jars. Think 
what this means to the occupants 
of the car — and also what it will 
mean on your tire bills. Some Car- 
ttTcar owners say the tire cost is 
a!)Otit half what other cars require. 

Here are facts that deserve you." 
serious consideration. If they arc 
true then you cannot afford to owm 
any other car — and we will just be 
delighted to prove every word. 
Write for catalog and address of 
nearest agent. 



Cartercar Company 



Pontiac, Michigan 



BRANCHES: NEW VORK, CHICAGO, DETROIT, KANSAS CITV. 




THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 361 



Special Delivery 

During this month we shall double our usual efforts in points of delivery and service. 
Early indications not having been most favorable, it is possible many beekeepers will not 
have laid in a sufficient stock of supplies, such as sections and foundation, for the clover 
and basswood this month. We are prepared to make up for this oversight by having a 
large stock of both sections and foundations on hand for instant delivery. We carry 
nothing but the Root make, which insures the best quality of everything. We sell at 
factory prices, thereby insuring a uniform rate to everyone. The saving on transportation 
charges from Cincinnati to points south of us will mean quite an item to beekeepers in 
this territory. We are so located that we can make immediate shipment of any order 
the day it is received. 

Honey and Wax 

If you haven't made arrangements for the disposition of your honey and wax tor 
this season, consult us. We buy both in large quantities, and can assure you of fair 
and courteous treatment, and a good price for your crop. 

Shipping-cases 

To sell your crop to the best advantage it must be well put up in attractive style. 
We have shipping cases that answer every requirement of looks and utility. Small pro- 
ducers who sell their crops locally will be interested in the cartons in which comb honey 
is put up to sell to the fancy customers at top-notch prices. We have honey-cans, too, in 
cases for those who produce extracted honey. In fact, there isn't anything we don't have 
that the beekeeper needs, cither to produce his crop or help to sell it. 

C. H. W. WEBER & CO. 

2146 Central Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio 



IF BEES COULD TALK 

They Would Say: 

"GIVE as 

'Dadant's Foundation' 



IT'S CLEAN, ITS PURE, IT'S FRAGRANT, 
IT'S JUST LIKE THE COMB WE MAKE OURSELVES " 



If you are not using "DADANT'S FOUNDATION" drop us a card 

and we will give you prices or tell you where 

you can get it near you. 

DADANT & SON S, V^^y'hlTs'. 
A. G. WOODMAN CO., Grand Rapids 

Agent for Michigan 



362 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

White Comb Honey 

Fancy and No. 1. 

We Need Large Quantities and 
Can Use Yours 

WRITE us 

American Butter & Cheese Co. 

31-33 Griswold St. Detroit, Mich. 



Perfect Rendering of Wax 

From Old Comb and Cappings has always been a serious stumbling 
block for the bee-keeper. 

We have overcome this obstacle by installing a mighty Hydraulic 
Press, which extracts every particle of wax from the slumgum. Ouv 
charge for rendering is 5c a lb., and we pay you the highest market 
price, remitting the day after rendering. 

Our process — extracting all the wax — more than pays the charges, 
and leaves you a greater profit than you expected, besides relieving you 
of that messy and unsatisfactory job of rendering. 

Barrel up your old comb and cappings and let us surprise you, as we 
have the many who have already shipped theirs. 

We need great quantities of Comb and Extracted Honey. 

Write us. 



The FRED W. MUTH CO. 

" The Busy Bee Men " 
204 Walnut St. CINCINNATI, O. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 



363 



PAGE-KENKEL 
MFG. CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

"NONE BETTER" 

Bee - Keepers' 

Supplies 

THIRTY YEARS EXPERIENCE 

Perfect sections from young, white, 
kiln dried basswood. White Pine Hives 
and Supers, Excellent Shipping Cases, 
Brood Frames, Separators, etc. 

We invite your correspondence. 

Page -Kennel 
Manufacturing Co, 

New London, Wis. 



WANTED 

NEW CROP 

HONEY 



Both Comb and 
Extracted 

Are you looking for a market? New 
York is as good as any. We handle on 
commission and buy outright. Write 
us before disposing of your honey. 



Hildreth & Segelken 

2«o--(»7 Green^vicSi St. 
>E\V YORK CITY, X. Y. 



ii 



falcon^^ Queens 



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Select tested, $2.00 each; 6, $10.00; 
12, $18.00. 

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Marshfield, Wis. 



364 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




E. B.TYRRELL, Managing Editor. 



(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE 
NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSOCIATION 

Office OF Publication - - - 230 \A/oodlan d Aven ue 



VOL. XXV. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, OCTOBER 1, 1912. No. 10. 

Short Biographical Sketches of the Men Who Are 
Now Editing The Review. 

E. D. TOWN SEND. 

^^HIS is August 5th, 1912. It was in 1858, 51: years today, I was 
mj_j born. Down east in York state, in Jefferson Co., near Water- 
town, on Grandfather Nathen Townsend's farm, now a suburb of 
the city. Next to her wedding day, my mother used to mention 
this date as an episode in her life. Not that my mother thought 
more of me than of her other children, for I never knew my mother 
to show partiality to any of us. I was the older one ; later, it be- 
came more of a common occurrence, as there are four of us, two 
brothers and one sister. My two brothers make bee-keeping the 
greater part of their business, and I'll be "gol darned" if father 
jiasn't now gone into the bee business. 

At six months of age I had the pleasure (?) of moving by 
sleigh from Jefferson Co. to AVayne Co., near South Butler, with 
my parents. I write this as I was told, as my memory is a little 
vague of this period of my life. When six years of age my parents 
moved to Michigan, and I can just remember that I went along. 
After a long, tired ride on the steam cars, one day the brakeman 
came in and hollered out "Pewamo." Then I remember that there 
was a considerable "commotion" in our part of the car. AA'earing 
apparel was "donned," bundles, boxes and hand-bags were gathered 
up, as this was our destination — Pewamo. Ionia Co., ^Michigan. The 
second six years of my life was spent with m}^ parents on a farm 
two and a half miles southwest of Pewamo, in the township of 



366 



THE BEE-KEEPERS REVIEW 




Lyons, on Maple 
street. 'Sly father 
had the distinttion 
of setting the first 
maple trees on this, 
one of the very fin- 
est rural streets in 
the state. 

At twelve years 
of ag"e my parents 
moved on a farm 
near Hubbardston, 
in Clinton Co., Michi- 
gan. It was on this 
farm that my bee- 
keeping experience 

"We are Going to Be Pa-pa's stenographers when We are Old Enough." began.'ln June. 1876 
[Pno/o by Tojvtisend.] o .'■'•> 

a swarm of bees was 
seen to go over; I followed and found them entering a large elm 
tree. The next day a neighbor helped me to get the swarm from 
the tree, by felling it and hiveing them as a new swarm, for they 
had not built any comb to speak of. I am not sure but that state- 
ment needs revising. It would be nearer the truth had I said that 
I helped the neighbor, for he had had some experience, I none at 
that time. I was now 17 years old, with a considerable energy, and 
without a cent. My first swarm was moved home that night, after 
the bees had done flying for the day. I have had .bees ever since 
that eventful day. 

Either the season of 1876 was an exceptionally good one with 
us. or my first swarm a very large and thrifty one, for they soon 
filled their hive and I divided them in the middle, giving each a half 
of the bees, brood and honey. Each half filled their hive before 
winter and must have been in fairly good shape, as they both win- 
tered. 

During the first ten years of my bee-keeping, less than 50 swarms 
were kept. At the end of this period I was married to Sarah L. 
Foreman, a neighbor girl. Four of our five children are now living, 
two boys and two girls. 

The boys are both bee-keepers, and the girls say they are going 
to be pa's stenographers when they get old enough. They are, one 
ten the other eleven years old. 

Now came a period of about fifteen years when bees v/ere still 
kept as a side issue, but nearly a hundred swarms were kept in one 
home yard. During the last few years we have kept "more bees" 
as the readers know who have followed me in my writings in the 
past. — E. D. TowNSEND. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 367 

WESLEY FOSTER. 

A person is so tremendously interested in his own welfare and 
progress that it is difficult to write a worth}- autobiographical sketch. 
The writer writes of things exterior to himself, and when he turns 
his view inward to set down the things there seen, the problem is a 
difficult one indeed. 

^ly birthplace is !Mount Vernon. loAva, where is located Cornell 
College, a Methodist institution my father and mother both attended, 
and there they met, fell in love and married before either had fin- 
ished their courses. My uncle, Oliver Foster, was keeping bees at 
Mt. Vernon at the time I was born, Jan. 5, 1884:. As youngsters, 
my brothers and I used to earn quite a few pennies helping Uncle 
Oliver with the easier parts of the bee work. Father at that time 
did not keep more than fifty colonies, so that we did not have much 
bee work of our own to do. 

Father moved his family overland to Colorado in the fall of 
1897, when I was 13 years old, and the trip will never be forgotten. 
The trip took seven weeks, and I was the right age to enjoy it. 
The plains, with the dry buffalo grass, level and desolate, except 
for priarie dogs, coyotes, an occasional ranch house and herds of 
cattle, was a radical change from the greenness of Iowa. When we 
reached Greeley district of Colorado I thought alfalfa was the green- 
est and richest color that could be imagined. 

Father embarked in bee-keeping within a few months after 
reaching Colorado, and he soon had his first experience with Amer- 
ican foul brood. 

I attended the Boulder public schools and the State Preparatory 
school. Went to school in Chicago for a part of two years. I took 
two correspondence courses which is about the sum of my schooling. 
Have been in the bee business producing comb honey most of the 
time. Have been in partnership with my father and brother. W. 
W. Foster, all of the time. We have operated from 250 to 1,000 
colonies, and never had what could be called a bumper crop. At 
the present time T am secretary of the Colorado State Bee-Keepers' 
Association, and have charge of the Colorado bee inspection under 
Prof. C. P. Gillette, state entomologist. Father and I are operating 
about 200 colonies here at Boulder, and in Montezuma county, and 
my brother, W. W. Foster, has 500 colonies of ours and leased bees 
at Nyssa, Ore. 

August 31st, 1910, I married Cordia Stevenson, an Iowa girl 
from my home town, IMount \^ernon. V\^e have a little daughter, 
Dora May. who brightens our home and whose favorite color is that 
of the Review cover. She is seven months old. and already devours 
many a newspaper, so we think she is inclined toward literature. — 
Wesley Foster. 



368 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



E. B. TYRRELL. 



I was born in the Township of Davison, County of Genesee, 
State of Michigan, on ]\Iay 16th, 1877. My boyhood days, which 
were the same as any other healthy country boy's, were all 
spent in this township. At the age of 16 I decided to invest in 
a pop corn machine. My uncle suggested that 1 better spend my 
money for a swarm of bees. One of my weak points has always 
been that when I made up my mind to do a thing it has been hard 
to give up. So the pop corn machine was purchased. But that sug- 
gestion regarding bees had taken root, and within the next year 1 
earned enough money by picking apples at 50c per day to buy a 
swarm in a box hive, in the fall, at $4.00. A bee-keeper living about 
a mile from me kept his bees in chaff hives, and believing that my 
bees could not winter without protection, I made a packing box, 
packed everything nicely with rags, and the next spring had the 
tamest bees in the neighborhood. 

That didn't quench the bee fever, however. So my stepfather 
bought, at an auction sale, five colonies for me. I believe two of 
these died before spring was over, and at least one of the other 
three was weak. 

A few years later I hired out to the late Charley Koeppen. who 
at that time lived near Flint, Michigan. The two of us "batched" 
it. and cared for his nearly 400 colonies, running them all for comb 
honey. Mr. Koeppen was a crank on manipulation, having no use 
for the "Coggshall lightning methods," and would not permit a bee- 
veil being used by either of us. So I was thoroughly inoculated 
with stings. That year we harvested about 20,000 lbs. of comb 
honey. 

About this time I became interested in fraternal insurance work, 
starting out as an organizer for the Ancient Order of Gleaners, a 
farmers' society which at that time had about 8,000 members, but 
which now has nearly 80,000. It has been a see-saw between the 
Gleaners and the bees ever since. My last position with them, and 
the one I was holding when I took up the publication of the 
Review, was that of P^ield Manager, having charge of the deputies 
and the work of increasing the membership of the organization. 

I was married September 9th, 1901, to ^liss ]\iaud Enos, of Vas- 
sar, Alich., and our wedding trip was made to Buffalo, wliere, be- 
sides taking in the Pan-American Exposition, we also attended the 
meeting of the National Bee-Keepers' Association. We now have 
two boys, Norval and Milford, aged 7 and 9 years respectively. 

Owing to my organization work I never became very heavily 
engaged in bee-keeping, 200 colonies being the largest number kept 
at one time. — E. B. Tyrrell. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 369 

Wintering Bees. 

Read before the Colorado State Bee-Keepers' Assoeialion Convention 

in Denver, ipii. 

OLIVER FOSTER. 

' "Jl N preparing bees for winter, shall we provide for their protec- 

Tl tion from extremes of cold and heat by packing the hives, or 

shall we leave them unprotected? This question should be 

considered with reference to several other conditions which must be 

taken into account. 

Mr. A. carries his bees into the cellar, where he scrupulously 
maintains a uniform temperature of from 43 to 45 degrees. He has 
found that a much lower temperature than 43 degrees will result in 
a loss of many colonies and poor results generally, but he succeeds 
well with the higher temperature, and his experience is in harmony 
with all who winter in cellars. 

]\Ir. B. maintains, on the other hand, that cold does not hurt the 
bees in the least. He leaves his colonies right out of doors, in ordi- 
nary single-walled, unprotected hives, with the full summer entrance 
wide open and with perhaps an additional large opening at the top 
of the hive, right over the bees, which opens into a space between 
an inner and an outer cover, this space having free communication 
with all outdoors through spaces under the upper cover at ends or 
sides. 

His bees winter well, even though the mercury falls to zero or 
far below and though the snowy blizzards often rage throughout 
the winter. And ]\Ir. B.'s testimony agrees with that of many oth- 
ers who have no use for winter packing and whose bees generally 
come through the winter and spring in good candition. 

AVhy this difiterence of opinion and practice? How is it that A. 
and B. both succeed, each with his favorite method so different from 
that of the other, while various compromises between these two 
extremes do not as a rule give good results. I think we must look 
for the answer to this question in the fact that other important fac- 
tors are figuring in the problem. 

A. lives in a lower altitude, where the atmosphere is heavy and 
comparatively damp, and where cold weather continues for several 
months at a time in winter, with no warm days to enable the bees 
to fly and renovate their conditions. B. lives in Colorado's rare and 
dry atmosphere, where every two weeks or oftener throughout the 
winter the bright sunshine warms his unpacked hives and all ou'i- 
doors as well, arousing the bees from their hibernating stupor, 
afifording them the opportunity to take a cleansing flight, and to 
gather into their winter nest and into their now empty honey sac 
a fresh supply of stores from the outer combs and to reduce it to 



370 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

its proper consistency as to moisture for immediate use. 

After this renovating spell they can crawl into the empty cells 
within the cluster or take their position with those that are dele- 
gated to form the outer protecting crust of the cluster. These crust- 
forming bees assume a state of almost perfect hibernation, in which 
condition almost any degree of cold is harmless to them for a lim- 
ited time or until their honey sacs need replenishing, when another 
warming-up spell and a change of shift is necessary. 

Mr. A.'s bees in the cellar have no such natural season of warm- 
ing up ; consequently, the bees of each individual colony must, of 
their own accord, and at such times as their necessities require, 
work themselves up to the necessary degree of heat and activity 
for a similar renovation, although the cleansing flight is denied them 
until the spring setting-out time arrives. However, if all other 
conditions are perfect under the protection system, the flying spell 
seems to be unnecessary for long seasons. 

A uniform temperature of much below 43 degrees is probably 
unfavorable to the other and more necessary renovating operations, 
hence the advantage of a warm hive during long, protracted cold. 
Moreover, the air in Mr. A.'s cellar becomes unavoidably foul, and 
much damper than the air that sweeps through Mr. B.'s apiary and 
hives. For this reason, heat is necessary to enal^le the bees to force 
out these very injurious elements from their quarters. 

As I see it, the first essential condition for good wintering is 
a good quality of stores, gathered or stored from feeders after part 
of the brood is hatched, so that it is deposited within easy access 
to the contracted cluster of bees. The next important requisite is 
thorough elimination from the cluster of bees of the impurities and 
surplus moisture which are constantly emanating in greater or less 
amount from their bodies as w^aste material. 

This is accomplished in either one of two w^ays : The one by 
the expulsive power of heat; the other by means of a free circula- 
tion of cold, fresh air. The one under the warm protection system; 
the other under the open-air, unprotected system. 

The principles involved are quite different, l)ut the end accom- 
plished is the same — a dry winter nest. There are two methods of 
drying clothes on a cold winter day. One way is to hang them by 
a hot stove, where the heat turns the moisture into vapor and, 
expanding the steam, expels it from the fabric. The other way is 
to hang the clothes out of doors, where they instantly freeze stiff, 
but Avhcre the freeh' circulating, cold, dr}- air soon absorbs the very 
ice and carries it away as frozen vapor. These two principles em- 
ployed in drying clothes illustrate the two systems under w^hicli 
bees in winter quarters are kept dry and free from impure air. The 
one w^e might call the warm protected system ; the other the cold 
free-air svstem. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 371 

According to my experience and observation, a weak or un- 
populous colony needs warm protection. Especially is this true if 
their stores are not of good quality, or if they are short in quantity 
and scattered throughout the hive with much empty comb near the 
contracted cluster of bees. Again, some kind of protection is neces- 
sary in localities where cold weather is long continued, in a cold, 
damp climate, or in a low altitude. It seems that a weak and un- 
protected colony requires too great a proportion of their bees to 
form that protecting crust I have mentioned, so that there is not 
a sufficient number of bees remaining to form what should be the 
main body of the cluster within this outer crust, where a little more 
heat should be maintained, the bees remaining less dormant and 
slightly active, and so able to minister to the needs of the colony 
as to heat and nourishment. When all, or nearly all, the bees are 
required for the more dormant crust, the colony perishes. 

The best method of packing I have found, and I have tried 
about every form, is to set the hives together in bunches or piles 
so that all their adjoining sides touch each other. To this end there 
must be no projections on these adjoining sides either on the bottom 
boards, bodies or covers. They should be placed four abreast facing 
south or southeast and the front end should be left exposed to the 
sun. The top and the northeast and west sides of the bunch may 
be packed with straw or chafif if desired and the packing held in 
place with boards and rocks or with burlap and baling wire. I 
think it is a good plan in case of weak colonies to place a second 
tier of four or five hives on top of the first, with covers and bottoms 
removed from between the two tiers and these replaced by single 
sheets of tin or sheet iron. To form temporary bottom boards of 
these metal sheets a bee space is formed on their upper sides by 
tacking strips on the sides and back. 

To avoid confusion the entrances are contracted and separated 
as far as practicable, with here and there a sheet of tin shoved in 
between the hives. The removed bottoms and covers are used to 
retain the packing or to protect the bunch of hives from storms. 
No mixing of bees need be feared when separating the hives in 
spring upon their summer stands, since the appearance of the whole 
yard is entirely changed at once. This should be done when few 
bees are flying and all locations will be marked by the bees on their 
first flight. 

[Mr. Oliver Foster gave his wintering plan, somewhat similar to the one here 
described, some time ago in the Review. Here, however, he has gone into the 
question a little differently. It must be borne in mind that packing straw around 
the hives as he describes will give good results only where the winters are com- 
paratively dry. This plan will apply only to the arid west where the winters are 
dry and comparatively mild. Winter protection is needed in the west, however, 
for the west does have prolonged cold spells. The loss was verj' heavy in eastern 
Colorado the past winter, largely on account of the severe weather. The bee- 
men are preparing for more protection another winter. 



372 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Mr. R. H. Rhodes, of Platteville, Colorado, has used double walled hives some, 
and he tells me that they are not so satisfactory and he has abandoned using 
them— W. F.] 



The Successful Wintering of Bees. 

How the Cellar is Built, With a Work-shop Overhead, at a Nom- 
inal Cost. 

A. D. D. WOOD. 

* — A WAY back in the SO's, when I first began to take financial 
^Xv interest in the bee. I began to wonder how I could winter 
them year after year and be successful. About that time 
Prof. A. J. Cook was very enthusiastic on sub-earth ventilated bee- 
cellars, and I fell victim to the idea and built one according to his 
plans. It worked all right as he predicted. But did we need the 
sub-earth ventilator? No, I don't think we did. I used this cellar 
as long as I stayed "down on the farm" in Jackson County, ]\Iichi- 
gan, and after moving to Lansing", ]\Iich., I had to use any old 
place I could find. Here at home I wintered part in the cellar under 
the dwelling and part packed outdoors. The difiference was alwa\^s 
in favor of the cellar and at times there was as much as a foot of 
water in it, and I have had to wear rubber boots at times in carry- 
ing out the bees in the spring. The temperature would range all 




Exterior View of Work Shop and Bee Cellar of A. D. D. Wood. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



373 







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M'*'^i^BM^jt''k^gh3BI^HEi J ^P^_ 


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Interior View of Bee Cellar, showing the Arrangement of Hives in Winter. 

the way from freezing to 55 above, and I could never see any bad 
results from the wide range. 

Things changed later, and I moved out of town with the bees 
and at times I have had to resort to any kind of a cellar, and I 
mostly packed them out doors in boxes and chaff hives. But those 
that were out of doors I have always felt sorry for. Why? Oh, 
just because there is nothing gives me more joy than to enter a 
cellar where the conditions are "just right" and hear the joyful hum 
of the bees. We can't hear that out doors, but if the winter is like 
the last one we can "sob" any way. 

StrCCESS XN OUT OF DOOB WHTTEBIITG MEANS MOBE VIGH-ANCE, MOBS 
HONEV, MOBE TIME, ETC. 

I well know there are many who have good success out of doors 
and what does that mean? It means "more vigilance, more honey, 
more time, more — this is pretty bad on the bees out doors," and a 
lot of other "mores" too, that I will leave out. 



HOW THE CEI.I.AB IS CONSTBUCTED. 

It is simple to construct a cellar that will safely winter 100% 
of all full colonies. It don't need to be an expensive thing. If you 
have a side hill it will be a little easier than on level ground, but 



374 



THE BEE-KEEPERS" REVIEW 




Cellar in Process of Construction. 



will be no better for 
the safe wintering. 
I would not advise 
uilding" on damp 
ground where it is 
iable to keep the 
cellar damp and the 
bottom covered with 
more or less water. 
But as far as soil is 
concerned it makes 
NO d i ft e r e n c e. 
(Alaybe I have got 
my foot in it; just wait) Where I have my cellar now is very light sand, 
and it was easy to dig and easy to cave, too, and made me lots of trou- 
ble, but I got it at last. This was built in the fall of 1910, and before 
the walls were thoroughly dry I had to put the bees in for the win- 
ter. It being very soft sand, I was sure 1 had an ideal place for 
ventilation up through the soil, and did not need any sub-earth 
ventilator. The bees came through the winter, in fine shape and 
not one dead. But, oh, the mess in the soft sand. The dead bees 
were all trampled into the sand and I could not sweep them up, and 
all summer long there was that odor that is not inviting to stay 
with long, so I concluded to cement the bottom. I wrote to differ- 
ent ones and they said no, don't do it ; you will kill the ventilation. 
I said to myself I will ignore all advice and if the bees die I will 
get some more. The outcome is I have wintered 100% this winter 
too, and I can sweep out the floor and scrub it out with water and 
have a good, sweet place to eat my lunch in when the heat of the 
summer comes while working with the bees. And it is "as tight 
as a jug," too, except the two ventilators through the floor, 20x24 
inches square. 

It is built on a grade of 10%, and faces the south. It is 14x30 
feet outside, with a store room on top. The wall at the north end 
is 6 feet below the top of the ground, and the wall is 8 feet high. 
When the wall was up G feet and 6 inches I made a jog that I could 
put the 6x1 inch joist on for holding the shavings between the floors. 
Then I went up two feet further and on top of this I put 2x4's 
anchored in the wall by bolts, and a nut holds the sills to the wall. 
Anything will do for the floor to keep the planer shavings from 
sifting through, and after I laid thin stufit down I placed good thick 
paper on to be more sure, and to add to the warmth, also. The 
walls are 8 inch thick, and you will see by the interior view that 
there are heavy pieces running up and down in the center to be sure 
there would be no cave-in from the heavy pressure of the light sand 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 375 

on the outside, which is very great. There is 6 feet G inches in the 
clear inside under the lower joist. 

The entrance is ten feet long, and it is "just right," for there is 
plenty of room and the inner door swings out and the outer door 
swings in. There are four good wide steps and not too far apart, 
so it is easy on those carrying the bees in and out. The doors are 
extra wide. The cost is about $150.00, and I hired some out of this 
and did the rest myself. The first winter paid for it, and this winter 
saved enough to build another one — yes, I don t know but enough 
to build two other ones. 

Lansing, ]\Iich. 

[Mr. Wood begins the description of his new cellar by referring away back 
into the 80's, showing he has a ripe experience with the bees. If there is any 
one capable of instructing others along the line of success in our beloved pursuit, 
it's the "old heads" — those who by long experience have found out the better way 
of doing things apiculturial Well do I remember of Prof. Clark and his sub- 
earth ventilation schemes for bee-cellars. I think as Mr. Wood does, that they 
w-ere a success, but somehow we have found out that something more simple, 
just a plain cellar so well under ground that the temperature inside is not in- 
fluenced by the sudden changes outside, is all that is necessary for successful win- 
tering of bees. To be sure, some sort of a ventilator is necessary just as soon 
as you begin to overload the cellar with bees, for they surely do raise the tem- 
perature when a large body of bees is confined for a long time in the cellar. 
Especially toward spring will it be necessary to give an overcrowded cellar 
ventilation. 

In our big cellar in Charlevoix Co., which is 14x36 ft. inside, we did not 
need any ventilator for 250 colonics, but when we put in another hundred, the 
temperature soared to 50° tov.'ard spring. The next summer a 17" square ven- 
tilator was installed, which helped matters some. Even with this large ventilator 
open, the temperature would play around the 50° mark, and the last cold winter 
the temperature ranged from 44° to 46° during the cold period, then toward spring 
it raised some above the 50° mark. 

As I said last month, bees seem to winter well in a cellar with varying tem- 
perature, providing other conditions are favorable, i. e., strong colonies, good 
stores, etc. 

If I could take the reader with me to some of the cheaply constructed bee- 
cellars in Northern Michigan that winter successfully year after year, I could 
prove to them conclusively that the variation in temperature of bee-cellars was 
of a secondary consideration. 

I helped to take out a bunch of bees one spring from one of these cheap 
built cellars, so poorly built that the rats from the inside and the hens from 
the outside had made openings along the eaves, so that the sun shone in at 
several places — they were all alive and apparently in good shape, that did not 
starve. 

Another instance was where 99 swarms had wintered out of 100 put in the 
previous fall. This cellar had but one inch thick lumber for the door and the 
snovvf drifted into the hatchway, filling it full. Do \o\x suppose the temperature 
in that cellar was anywhere near the orthodox 45° most of the time? I guess 
not. The temperature in that cellar likely varied 20° during the time the bees 
were occupying it. They were good swarms when put in and had an abundance 
of that fine Raspberry honey to winter on. 

After knowing of the success of so many of the cheap cellars, poorly con- 
structed, I cannot tell you why we made it a point in building ours to so build 
it that there would be the least possible chance for this variation in temperature. 
But we did, and it does not winter a "whit" better for it, though. — Townsend.] 



376 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

Wintering of Bees. 

A Part in the Cellar, and a Part in Packing Cases Out of Doors — 

a Comparison. 

LEON C. WHEELER. 

'"Jl 'VE been thinking about this wintering proposition. 'We have 
Tl had a pretty bad winter and the bees I wintered out of doors 
did not come out very well. Two or three colonies were 
short of stores and I wouldn't blame any bee for dying when the 
bee-keeper refused to leave her enough to eat. But a lot of mine 
found dead this spring were well supplied with honey of good 
quality, and moreover there was apparently no dysentery in the most 
of them, and still they died. The only reason I can give to account 
for it is that it was so cold, and for so long, that the bees starved 
with plenty of honey in the hive, simply because they could not 
move from one comb to the other because of the long continued cold 
weather. Those which remain alive are not so strong as I could 
wish, and as I lost about 50% of those I wintered out of doors here 
in my home yard, I naturally don't feel very jubilant about it. I 
haven't been to the out-yard yet since the weather was mild enough 
to look them over very well, but don't think the loss will be quite 
so heavy there. 

THOSE WINTEREI) IN THE CEIiIiAR ARE AI.I. aOOS STRONG COIiONIES, 
WHIIiE THOSE WINTERED OUT OF BOORS ARE NOT VERV STRONG. 

But I tried twenty-four colonies in the cellar this winter, and 
while I might have done a great deal better than I have with them, 
still it has set me thinking. I saved eighteen of the twenty-four 
colonies, and they are all good, strong colonies. Those wintered 
out of doors are not very strong on an average. 

WINTER CASES ARE USED TO PROTECT CEIiIiAR WINTERED BEES 

DURING SPRING. 

I got a lot of extra outside winter cases and I set these colonies 
into them without packing, except a cushion over the top as fast 
as I set them out of the cellar, and I don't anticipate much trouble 
with their spring dwindling. 

But now let me go back to last fall, when I put the bees in the 
cellar. I wasn't very enthusiastic about it, for the only cellar avail- 
able was a very damp one and was in use for the storing of vege- 
tables and, as it turned out afterwards, a rather cold cellar at that. 
But I partitioned ofif a place and set some potato crates on the 
bottom of the cellar and made a platform of boards on these to set 



TME BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 377 

the bees on, for you must know that sometimes there is water 
standing- in the bottom of the cellar, and as it is a clay bottom it 
doesn't pass ofif very fast. 

I carried the bees in and set them in tiers, three deep, on these 
benches with the covers all on, but with a fairly good entrance 
ventilation. Then I got a barrel of lime and set it in the middle of 
the place I had them in to help dry the atmosphere, and thought 
my job was complete. But I went down to the convention at 
Saginaw and heard Mr. Smith, of Cheboygan, telling about how he 
wintered his bees in a cellar so wet that he was obliged to float 
them out on a raft in the spring. He said they always came out 
bright and healthy in the spring and without any mold in the hives, 
and laid it to the fact that he left them with all the covers ofT and 
many of them without bottoms. The tops were simply covered 
with burlaps. 

\\ ell, I didn't like the idea of going into my cellar and stirring 
the bees all up to get those covers off, but still the idea appealed to 
me and when I got home I went down and succeeded in getting 
most of the covers off without disturbing them much. Perhaps six 
or eight covers I left on. It got pretty cold last winter and for a 
good share of the winter the thermometer stood at 32 to 34 degrees. 
I had been told that the temperature should never be allowed to 
go below forty, but I had also heard that artificial heat was a bad 
thing unless absolutely necessary. So I let them go. 

Six of them died. I think four of them were without anything 
to eat and I couldn't blame them. The other two were among the 
ones I left the covers on, and they were a moldy, nasty mess. So 
were the live ones that had the covers on, for that matter, and they 
were not in as good condition other ways as those where the covers 
had been removed. But those that had the covers removed came 
out just fine — strong, no mold or dampness, and just as bright and 
healthy a looking lot of bees as one could wish to see. 

Well, there ! Now I am ready to tell you what I have been 
thinking about. Why can't I build a good cellar and winter my 
bees there (by taking a little more pains I believe I can winter them 
finely that way), and then when I set them out put them all inti) 
those winter cases through the spring? I believe I can do this and 
have bees in far better shape for the honey flow than I can by win- 
tering out of doors, and at the same time not have any serious 
trouble with spring dwindling, etc., which is the greatest drawback 
to wintering in the cellar. I can build a cellar in a good sandy 
location and I believe I can have it so it will not get so cold. I'm 
tempted to try it, anyway. 

Barrvton. Mich. 



378 



THE BEE-KEEPERS- REVIEW 



Some Comments on Member Wheeler's Article in 

This Issue. 

E. D. TOWNSEND. 

^^^^^ E^IBER AMieeler starts his communication by sa3'ing', "I've 
l/^£ been thinking,"' and the thought occurred to me — wouldn't 
it be a g;ood idea for us to do some thinking along the 
line we have chosen as our vocation? There are so many things 
to think about that I hardly know wdiich to mention first. But "I've 
been thinking/' and I think I'll put wintering of otir bees and getting' 
them through the spring in good shape to take care of the harvest 
that is to come, as the most essential to think about of any one 
part of our preparations for the crop to come. 

In last month's Review, member David Running told us to 
feed our colonies in eight-frame hives until they weigh 60 pounds 
for winter stores. If 25 pounds of this gross weight is winter stores, 
it would leave 35 pounds as the weight of the hive, combs, bees 
and bee-bread. In calculating the extra heft of the ten-frame hive 
over the eight, we have two extra combs a little more than two 
inches in width of hive to add to the heft of the 'eight-frame hive, 
which, 'T've been thinking,'' would add about "20% to the heft of 




Hives on their Winter Stand, as they Appear in Summer. 
[See Editorial Department ] [Pholo by Towiisetiei.] 



THII BtlE-KFJlPERS- REVIEW 



379 




The Winter Case with One Side, also One-Halt the Roof Removed, 
as they Appear Packed for Winter. 

{Sec Editorial Depaitment.] [Phvlo by Townsctid.] 



the liive. Using these 
figures as a basis, 
"I've been thinking'' 
that when fed for 
winter, if the eight- 
frame hive should 
weigh GO pounds, the 
10-frame ought to 
weigh 67 pounds, 
assuming that the 
same amount of stores 
will be necessary in 
either case. "I've 
been thinking" for 
several years that it 
was not of half so 
m u c h importance 
where or how we un- 
dertake to winter 
our bees, as it was 
to have all good, strong szvartJis with plenty of good stores to winter 
upon. Colonies in this condition are in shape to stand almost any 
kind of weather, either in the cellar or packing cases outside. 

Our experience and those of others that have come under my 
observation go to show that altogether too much stress has been 
placed upon the matter of temperature in the bee-cellar. 

About member 
Smith's cellar that 
m ember Wheeler 
mentions. ^Member 
Smith has a very 
damp cellar, built 
in very heavy clay 
soil. This location 
for a bee cellar is, 
according to the or- 
thodox writer, the 
most to be avoided. 
For m any years 
member Smith had 
trouble in wintering 
in his cellar. One 
spring, by accident, 

Wrapped in No, 2 Tar Paper for Spring Protection. Some Bee- ^ COVer WaS knockcd 
Keepers Report Good Results "Wintering" with Hives thus Pro- rr i • j 

tected. The Cover is Slid Out of Position to Better Show Man- OIT a hlVC and not 

ner of Wrapping. ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^,.^„,,„^.] di S C O V C r C d Until 




380 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

spring when removing the bees from the cellar. His first thought 
when discovering the condition the swarm was in was, they are a 
"goner," but upon examining it he found it to be the very best win- 
tered colony in the cellar; then he wished they were all "goners." 
He had the cue. From that time to this no bees have been put in 
his cellar with covers on, and all have wintered well. Another in- 
stance where it was not the cellar that was to blame for poor winter- 
ing, but the knowing how to use it. 

The lesson we learn here is, if the cellar is very damp, winter 
with covers removed, the frames being covered with burlap, giving 
an abundance of upward ventilation to each individual hive. If the 
cellar is only moderately dry and you are not having the best results 
in wintering, try a portion of the swarms with covers removed. 

With our cellar in Charlevoix Co., which is very dry, and the 
temperature varies from 40 to 56 degrees during winter, we see no 
difference whether the covers are removed or left sealed down. I 
said removed. We do not remove any of our covers, but pry some 
of them loose and slide them endwise until the end cleat of the 
cover rests upon the end of the hive, making an opening the whole 
length of both sides of the hive Yi inch at one end and tapering to 
nothing at the other end. This likely makes as much upward ven- 
tilation as though the cover was removed entire and covered with 
burlap. 

Somehow I do not like that sentence "spring dwindle." Did 
any one ever have a perfectly wintered swarm dwindle during 
spring? I think not. Isn't it poor wintering that causes dwindling 
during spring? 1 think it is. If it is poor wintering that causes 
bees to dwindle during spring, why not call it poor wintering, then 
the novice will understand what is meant and how to guard against 
the trouble in the future. 

Now about those winter cases for spring protection for cellar- 
wintered bees. We used to go to the trouble of papering all of 
our cellar-wintered bees soon after removing them from the cellar. 
With 300 colonies this was quite an expense both in labor and 
material. Finally, we began to leave the better swarms without 
papering — protecting only those that were light in bees. We have 
about come to the conclusion that a well-wintered colony, strong 
with bees, needs no protection more than is provided with a good 
tight-fitting cover on the regular single-walled hive. Sealed covers 
that have not been loosened up during winter are in excellent shape 
to resist the cold of spring. 

When covers are for any reason removed during spring, thus 
breaking loose the sealed feature, they are scraped clean of propolis 
and bur combs before returning to the hive. It sometimes happens 
that there is an accumulation of propolis on the top edge of the 
hive that may keep the flat cover from fitting down tight. If so, 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 381 

this should be removed. With the above precaution and a mod- 
erately heavy stone on each cover so treated, but very little heal 
will be lost from the upward current of air. 

If one cares to save the small swarms they can be helped won- 
derfully by wrapping them in paper, for they need every particle of 
animal heat they produce, thus the necessity of papering to stop all 
upward current of air. 

We are working upon a plan of handling these weaklings by 
uniting them with the most powerful colonies in the yards, then 
dividing them at the opening of the honey flow to keep our num- 
ber good. But more anon. 
Xorthstar, ]»tlich. 

Wintering Bees on the 60 Deg. Latitude. 

PAUL MICKWITZ. 

' "Jl HAVE often said to my bee-keeping friends here in Finland, 
^jl that it is my impression that the wintering problem is as hard 
to solve in the extreme south as it is in this latitude. The 
continual cold, with plenty of snow covering the hives, makes the 
colonies rest in perfect quietness. I believe they consume here less 
honey during the winter months than they would in a warm cli- 
mate. 

If the stores are good and there is a reasonable quantity of 
them, bees should go well through winter in spite of the extreme 
cold. My brother-in-law, who also keeps bees, wrote me a few 
weeks ago that their thermometer registered 38°C. ; still bees are 
doing well in his locality. 

Our bees are confined to their hive during six months, but in 
the extreme south hardly at any time of the year. This must nat- 
urally result in a greater consumption of stores, and if such are not 
supplied in time the whole colony may swarm out. I have such 
cases on record from the time I spent in your country. 

THE WOODSIAir FROTECTZON' HIVE. 

I have been using a few Woodman Protection Hives with very 
good success, also in wintering out of doors. The hive is well con- 
structed and well made for any cold clime. A very good point is 
that it furnishes protection against cold and heat as well. Especi- 
ally the super, with the loose outer case, is a grand thing during a 
cold snap, or when nights are chilly and the bees would desert the 
supers if unprotected. I should think the bee-keepers of the north- 
ern states and Canada have "the thing" in the Woodman Protection 
Hive, and if freight and custom were not too high I would use it 
exclusively. 

I^ANGSTROTH HrVES IN FINI.AND. 

My brother has constructed a double-walled hive, that he has 



382 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




Woodman Hives in the Botanical Park at Helsin^fors, Finland. 



used for many years 
with good success. 
The frames are of 
Lang'stroth dimen- 
sions, so you see, 
friends, that old 
father L. is not un- 
known in this "land 
of the thousand 
seas." Maybe brother 
himself will some- 
time describe his 
hive to the readers 
of the Review. I 

am going to buy 50 of them this spring. You will get an idea of 

its construction if you look at the pictures. 

A QUEEN BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION. 

I have often thought that those hundreds of queen specialists in 
America (including Canada), should join an association. It would 
certainly do a lot of good to the science and practice of queen breed- 
ing. They could have their annual meetings at t}ie same time and 
place as the National, so all members of this mother association 
could be present at the breeders" meeting. Who shall get them to- 
gether? Yon, just Mr. Brown or Jones, you must make the start 
before anybody else does it and pushes the idea. But perhaps you 
have such an association already? Good, if it is true! 

THE CARNIOX.AN BEE IN THE NORTH. 

Our capital — Hclsingfors — is situated on the latitude of South 
Greenland, i. e., the 6th degree. Still the Carniolan or Krainer bee 
is well adapted for our climate. First, it is a hardy bee; second, the 
queens are very prolific, so that they quickly fill the brood chamber 
during our short breeding season. Smoke and veil (not to speak of 

gloves) are seldom 
absolutely necessary 
while working with 
our Carniolans. 

V\'e import the 
Carniolans from Car- 
niola, Austria. They 
were shipped in boxes 
as shovv'n in the pic- 
ture. The frames are 
of such dimensions 
that the combs, with 
but little trouble, 
can be transferred 
to L frames. 
Helsinsffors. Finland 




Woodman Hives Protected by Boards against Wind, Snow 
and untimely Sunshine. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 3f3 



Published Monthly 

E. B. TYRRELL, Managing Editor. 

Office — 2^0 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Michigati 

Associate Editors: 

E. D. TOWNSEND, Northstar, Mich. WESLEY FOSTER, Boulder, Colo. 

Entered as second-class matter, July 7, 1911, at the post office at Detroit, Michigan, under 
the Act of March 3, 1879. 

Terms — $1.00 a year to subscribers in the United States, Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Ha- 
waiian Islands, Porto Rico, Philippine Islands, and Shanghai, China. To all other countries 
the rate is $1.24. 

Diseontiniianees — Unless a request is received to the contrary, the subscription will be 
discontinued at the expiration of the time paid for. At the time a subscription expires a 
notice will be sent, and a subscriber wishing the subscription continued, who will renew later, 
should send a request to that effect. 

Advertising rates on applicntion. 



EDITORIAL 



Get out of the fright habit and into the fight habit. Alany a 
man has missed a picnic because he was certain a cloudy sky meant 
rain. 



The Iowa State University has added a course of bee-culture to 
its curriculum. 

This issue is pretty well taken up with articles on "Wintering." 
But they had to be published this month or be too late to be of 
benefit to the readers. 

Comb Honey. 

Farmers' Bulletin No. 503, with the above title, and v.a-itten by 
George S. Demuth, of the Division of Apiculture, Bureau of En- 
tomology, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C., has just 
been issued. It is a 48-page bulletin, (> by 9 inches in size, and 
covers the production, grading and marketing of comb honey. 

Indiana bee-keepers will remember ]\lr. Demuth as their former 
hustling bee inspector. This is the first bulletin we have seen from 
Mr. Demuth's pen, and it does credit to its author. Sent free on 
request. 

The Fred W. Muth Co. Suffer a Disastrous Fire. 

Tuesday morning. September 10th. a disastrous fire broke out 
at the place of business of the Fred W. ]\Iuth Co.. and according to 
a cut appearing in the Cincinnati Times Star the l)uilding was com- 
pletely gutted. 

]\Ir. }iluth. in a private letter, says they had $10,000 worth of 
honey in the building, all of which was paid for, and was covered 



3£4 THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 

by insurance to the amount of $'22,500. Much of the honey was in 
the cellar and on the first floor and was covered with tarpaulin by 
the salvage corps, so that with the insurance and the honey saved 
he does not think they will sutler much loss. 

The firm has rented a new building- at 204 Walnut St., and is 
ready to receive orders and shipments of honey as formerly. He 
assures me that he has full confidence in his ability to master the 
situation, and states that his customers need have no fear as to 
their shipments and orders, for they are as strong as "The Rbck of 
Gibraltar," and will never deviate from their motto: "Money back 
the very day shipment arrives." 



The New Firm of Page-Kenkel Manufacturing Company. 

Bee-keepers noticed the advertisement of the Page-Kenkel Mfg. 
Co. in last issue, but possibly did not know that this firm is the suc- 
cssor to the Page and Lyon Company which recently went into 
bankruptcy. The firm has been re-organized with J- F. Kenkel as 
treasurer and manager. L. B. Lesh as vice-president, and C. H. 
Marsh as secretary and treasurer. 

With thirty years' experience in the supply business there is 
no reason why this firm should not enjoy a full share of the patron- 
age of the bee-keepers. We wish them the fullest measure of 
success. 

Ask the Candidates Now. 

Several State Associations are making arrangements to ask for 
larger appropriations for bee inspection, and several are desirous of 
a change in the laws they now have. A word of encouragement to 
the bee-keepers who have this work in hand should be given at 
every opportunity. They should feel that the money spent for the 
advance of bee culture is one of the best investments that a state 
can make. Our state legislatures are too much controlled by the 
city element and the professional politician ; neither class appreciates 
the need for the development and advance of country interests. 
Apiary inspection is one form of bee-keeping extension and an in- 
spector's work becomes easier as bee-keeping practice improves. 
There is not a state but what should spend from $5,000 a year up 
on advancing bee culture. I do not think the bee men are any 
slower than the farmers in asking for state appropriations, but the 
whole rural population is waking up to the fact that the Agricultural 
Institutes, special trains, etc., are bringing money-making ideas to 
their attention. 

Now, before election, is the time to ask the candidates where 
they stand on agricultural and apicultural extension. A candidate 
is for you to command and he will listen to you more earnestly 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 385 

before election than he may after he is elected. Get the candidate 
pledged and he will not forget it so quickly as he will if he is not 
asked till after he is in office. 

A feeling of fear seems to possess a goodly number of bee men, 
when they think of asking a legislator for a favorable vote on a 
question. This should not be. Legislators are more or less human 
and in every day life are about like other people. 

The habit of writing to state and national representatives and 
senators is one that should be more largely contracted among the 
bee men. Have a list of their names handy so that they can be 
easily reached at any time. — \V. F. 



Manipulating the Markets. 

In a little town in Central ^Michigan a local elevator man was 
buying beans. His finances beginning to run low, he went to his 
banker and asked what he could do, as farmers were bringing the 
beans and he couldn't refuse to buy them. The banker advised him 
to reduce the price 10c a bushel. He did, but immediately the 
farmers got scared at the falling price and rushed in the beans faster 
than ever. In his report to stop the rush of beans he simply in- 
creased it, and was forced by the producers to make several thous- 
and dollars that year that he would not otherwise have made. To- 
day he knows that a good way to get beans is to simply lower the 
price. Look out that you don't get fooled on your honey in the 
same way. 

In every large city they have a produce board that sets the 
price of farm produce daily. These men are supposed to consider 
the supply and demand, and set the price accordingly. Markets are 
quoted through the daily press. When a supply of poultry is needed 
markets can be quoted high, demand brisk, and supply short. This 
will start a supply from the country, but by the time they arrive 
the demand diminishes, supply increases and prices smash. The 
producer gets the smashed price. Before the peach growers of 
Georgia were organized, carload shipments of peaches sent to the 
northern markets were known to be coming long before they ar- 
rived, and the market fixed for their arrival. 

Over in Colorado there is a paper published, the Montrose 
Weekly Press, which reported the crop of honey on the western 
slope as from 35 to 40 cars. The impression was given that the 
crop in Colorado is large this year. Unfortunately for Colorado 
bee-men this report Avas copied by Gleanings in Bee-Cnltnre. The 
Colorado Honey Producers' Association had 10 cars of honey booked 
for sale, and when this report was published every buyer cancelled 
his order. This would not have been so bad had the report given 
been true, but according to a letter from Director Foster tliere will 



386 THE BEE-KEF.PERS' REVIEW 

not be 10 cars of honey on the whole western slope, and he doubts 
if there are 35 cars in the whole state. We believe that Gleanings 
was innocent of any intention to injure the producer, but it shows 
how dangerous to the producer it is to copy any such reports from 
the press which may have been given for the purpose of influencing 
the market. 

Wintering Bees Out of Doors in Cases Packed With Chaff. 

With a rule of every thing portable in out-yard work, our win- 
ter cases are built in sections. Each section of the case is built flat, 
so it can be loaded upon a wagon or car for moving about as well as 
if in the crude state of lumber. 

The case is built of hemlock lumber, except the framework of 
the sides, ends and covers, which are of hardwood, this being better 
to hold the nails. The roof, sides, ends and floor is made of %" 
planed and matched material, the best part being selected for the 
cover. The three sleepers supporting the floor are 2x4s laid flat, 
and the floor is nailed to the sleepers as in laying matched flooring. 

The case is built to winter four swarms, two pair placed side by 
side close together and two pair placed close together at the back 
ends, forming a solid block of four swarms, two facing east and two 
facing west. They may winter just as well facing north and south, 
but we reason that by facing our bees east and west, all colonies get 
an equal share of the sun, which may be an advantage. 

We like a considerable packing around our hives in winter, so 
built our winter cases large enough to admit of 5" of chaff on all 
sides and 8 to lO''^ on top. As we winter most of our bees IJ'^ stor- 
ies high, we build the cases 27'" deep. 

The floor of the case is used summer and winter (for a. stand in 
summer), the swarms being placed one on each corner of the stand 
during summer, then during winter are crowded close together at 
the center, which leaves the desired 5'' for packing material on all- 
sides. 

For the 10-frame L hive the floor is built 42x50". The sides 
and ends of the case are made large enough to telescope over the 
floor %" to exclude snow and rain at the bottom, the frame-work 
of the case preventing its telescoping too far. 

The case is "tacked" together at each corner with 6d nails, and 
can be easily pried apart for summer storing or moving. 

The entrance "bridge" is 2}^^^ high and 8" long, admitting the 
bees to enter on the wing to the inner hive. The half-tone submit- 
ted will make everything so plain but little description is necessary. 

We usually pack our bees early this month (October), and 
the material used for packing varies according to the ease of pro- 
curing. We see no difference between wheat, oat or clover chaff, 
and have sometimes used oat straw with good results. — Townsend. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 387 

®1}^ Nattnnal l^^-K^i^p^rfi' AsHnrtattnu 

Atib tta UlranriiPa 

Officers. Directors. 

George W. York, President Sandpoint, Ida. E. D. Townsend, Chairman Remus, Mich. 

MoRLEY Pettit, Vice-Pres. . .Guelph, Ont., Can. J. M. Buchanan Franklin, Tenn. 

E. B. Tyrrell. Secretary Detroit, Mich. Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. 

230 Woodland Ave. J. E. Crane Middlebury, Vt. 

N. E. France, Treas. Gen. Mgr., Plattville, Wis. F. Wilcox Mauston, Wis. 

tTational Branclies and Their Secretaries. 

Arizona Honey Exchange X. Michigan — Ira D. Bartlett 

G. M. Frizzell, Terape, Ariz. East Jordan, Mich. 

Adirondack — H. E. Gray.. Fort Edwards, N.Y. Ohio — Prof. N. E. Shaw, Dept. of Agr.... 

Colorado — Wesley Foster Boulder, Colo. Columbus, Ohio 

Chicago-Northwestern- — L. C. Dadant.... Ontario — P. W. Hodgetts, Parliament Bldg., 

Hamilton, 111. Toronto, Ont., Can. 

Hampshire — Hampden — Franklin — Dr. Oregon — H. Wilson Corvallis, Ore. 

Burton N. Gates Amherst, Mass. Pecos Valley— Henry C. Barron 

Idaho — R. D. Bradshaw Notus, Ida. Hagerman, New Mexico 

Illinois— Jas. A. Stone. .. Rt. 4, Springfield, 111. Pennsylvania— H. C. Klinger, Liverpool, Pa. 

Iowa— C. L. Pmn-y Le Mars, Iowa -iwis Falls— C. H. Stimson. .Twin Falls, Ida. 

Indiana— Geo. W. Williams, Redkey, Ind. Tennessee— J. M. Buchanan, Franklin, Tenn. 

Missouri — J. F. Diemer Liberty, Mo. Texas— Willis C. Collins, Box 154 

Michigan— E. B. Tyrrell, 230 Woodland Goliad, Texas 

Ave., Detroit, Mich. \'ermont — P. E. Crane Middlebury, Vt. 

Minnesota — C. E. Palmer, 1024 Miss. St.. Washington — J. B. Ramage 

St. Paul, Minn. Rt. 2, N. Yakima, Wash. 

New Jersey— E. G. Carr New Egypt, N. J. Wisconsin — Gus Dittmer Augusta, Wis. 



Pennsylvania State Meeting. 

Our Pennsylvania summer meeting will be held in Annville, 
Pa., Saturday, October 12th. A lively and interesting time expected. 
Every member and bee-keeper should attend. 

Sincerely, 
H. C. Klixger^ Secretary, Liverpool, Pa. 



State Convention of Michigan National Branch. 

The annual convention of the ^Michigan Branch, X. B. K. A., 
will be held at the State Agricultural College, East Lansing, Thurs- 
day and Friday, December 12th and 13th. ]^Iichigan always has a 
good convention, and this should be no exception. Full program 
later. 

National Convention at Cincinnati. 

The directors have finally decided to hold the next National 
convention in Cincinnati, Ohio, \\ ednesday and Thursday, February 
12th and 13th. There will be a two-days' session, and according to 
present indications part of the sessions will be devoted to a regular 
program, the same as in the past, and part to the business which 
must be transacted by the delegates. All of the meetings will be 
open to the public, however, and while the business must be trans- 
acted by the delegates, all members will be welcome to attend those 
meetings. Full program later. 



388 THE BEE-KEEPERS* REVIEW 

The Pecos Valley Branch Give Attention to Their State Fair. 

In addition to having their secretary, Henry C. Barron, as super- 
intendent of the bee and honey exhibit at the Pecos Valley Fair, 
this branch also has a committee to assist Mr. Barron. Where such 
interest as this is shown by the bee-men themselves, there is no 
question but what the proper concessions can be secured from the 
fair management. Brothers, go and do likewise. 



Buyers' Committee on Grading Rules. 

On the question of uniform grading rules for comb honey, the 
buyers will be represented by Fred W. Muth, of Cincinnati, as chair- 
man ; R. A. Burnett, of Chicago, and Hildreth and Segelken, of 
New York. These men are to take up the buyers' side of the 
question, to meet with a committee of producers to be appointed by 
Director Townsend, and to draft a set of rules to be adopted by the 
National at its meeting in Cincinnati next February. 



Pennsylvania Officers Act As National Branch Officers. 

At the head of this department you will be pleased to notice 
the addition of Pennsylvania as a National Branch. This association 
has not had an opportunity to take formal action, but has accepted 
the plan outlined by the National directors which gives the mem- 
bers of an association full National benefits where the officers will 
agree to act as branch officers until the next meeting of their asso- 
ciation, when the members can decide what they wish to do. 

We are especially glad to welcome this new branch, as Penn- 
sylvania has a large number of bee-keepers, many of whom are 
already members of the National, and the Pennsylvania Association 
is known as one of the live ones. 



Meeting of the Missouri Branch. 

At their annual meeting, August 1st, the Missouri Association 
took official action making it legally the Missouri Branch of the 
National. Before this time the officers were only acting as branch 
officers, and the action of the Missouri Association is an excellent 
approval of its officers' judgment. 

At their sessions they discussed the question of premiums 
offered by their State Fair Association, and found that they were 
below the average. Action was taken towards getting them in- 
creased. 

State Inspector M. E. Darby gave a report of his inspection 
work, and impressed his hearers with the impossibility of one man 
properly doing the work necessary to stamp out foul brood from the 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 389 

state. An organized efifort will be made to get a larger appropria- 
tion for the work. Space will not permit us to print the full report 
sent in by Sec. J. F. Diemer. The convention adjourned at noon 
on the 2nd. 

The New Jersey Branch Holds a Summer Meeting. 

This was recently held at the Aliddlebourn apiary of Member 
C. H. Root, of Red Bank. At eleven o'clock Mr. Root welcomed 
the bee-keepers to his apiary in a few well chosen words. Response 
was made by President Cook. Dr. Cheney advanced the theory 
that if hives were made impervious to moisture by coating the inside 
with parafine, the moisture on the inside would run down the sides 
and out at the entrance, thus being conducive to better wintering. 
Deputy Bee Inspector Carr reported the inspection of 269 yards, 
1,9'80 colonies, and found 59 colonies alTected with American foul 
brood and 331 with European foul brood. 

A discussion on the introduction of queens brought out the 
fact that the best time to introduce was five hours after de-queening, 
and if the entrance was deep enough the cage could be shoved under 
the frames with good results. 

The secretary, E. G. Carr, New Egypt, N. J., kindly furnished 
the Review with the above report. 



The Texas State Association Becomes a National Branch. 

Texas bee-keepers, at their last State Convention, voted to 
become a branch of the National Bee-Keepers' Association. This 
shows that the bee men of Texas are of the right progressive spirit, 
and it is with pleasure that we add their name to the list of National 
Branches. 

At the present time we have 25 National Branches. When we 
remember that all of these had to come in after the new constitution 
was adoped, really since the first of last January, and that at a time 
after most conventions had been held, it really shows a remarkable 
growth. The rank and file of bee-keepers are certainly taking- 
kindly to the new form of organization, and appreciate the efiforts 
the National is now making. The letters which come to my desk 
prove this. One local association, in a state that has not yet 
af^liated with the National, writes me that their delegate is in- 
structed to work at their next state convention for affiliation, and 
that if the state does not affiliate that the local association will take 
the matter in their own hands. This only goes to show which way 
the wind blows. 

A New Branch in Massachusetts. 

The Hampshire, Hampden, Franklin Bee-Keepers' Association 
has now become officiallv a branch of the National. This action 



390 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



BEE KEEPER'S 

Fl ELD DAY 

A JOINT INSTITUTE 

OF THE 

SPENCER FARMERS aqd MECHANICS ASSOCIATION 

and Worcester County Bee Keepers Association 

Will Be Held At 

LUTHER HILL PARK, SPENCER 

SATURDAY. AUGUST 24 



was taken at a re- 
cent meeting, and 
the secretary, Dr. 
Burton N. Gates, 
has sent me a list 
of the officers and 
members. 

The bee-men of 
jSIassachusetts are 
especially active in 
convention work, 
having arranged 
early in the season 
a meeting for every 
month of 1912. Not 
being satisfied with 
having just bee- 
keepers present they 
recently arranged a 
joint meeting and 
field day for farm- 
ers, mechanics and 
bee-keepers. Large 
posters were gotten 
out, 15 by 22 inches 
in size, like the illus- 
tration given here- 
with. This was done 
bv the Worcester , , „^.„,. ^ ^ „ „ ^ 

J. L BYARD. Pres. W C. B. K. A 

County Association, o. f. fuller, see. w. c. b. k. a 
which we hope to 
number as one of 

our National branches soon. The idea of getting the farmers and 
bee-keepers together appeals to me as a good one, and opens the way 
for successful meetings in localities where there are not enough bee- 
keepers to make a strictly bee convention possible. This is a good 
thing to try out in your locality. 



11.00 A. M. to 5.00 P. M. 

SPEAKERS 

Dr. Burton N. Gates, State Inspector of Apia- 
ries of Massachusetts "Progress and Problems 
of Bee Inspection." 

Mr. Arthur C. Miller, State Inspector of Apia- 
ries of Rhode Island "Honey Production in New 
York State." 

other speakers will include President J. L. Byard. Vice-President F. M. Keith and 
Secretary O F. Fuller of the W. C B K. A. 

A large attendance of leading beekeepers is expected. Last year's meeting was 
attended oy over 200 from this and adjoining states. 



2.00 p. m. 



3.30 p. m. 



EVERYBODY INVITED 



BASKET LUNCH 



ARTHUR MUNROE. Pres. 8. F. & M. A. 
G. H. RAMER. Sec. S. F. & M. A. 



W. J. Heffeman. Leader Print, 16 Mechanic St., Spencer 



The Central Comb-Honey Packing Station. 

The Colorado comb honey grading rules will doubtless be the 
ones most nearly copied when the National Committee meets for 
drafting National rules. The making of four grades of comb honey 
increases the difficulty of grading to such an extent that the central 
grading station is going to be almost a necessity. It will require a 
trained man or woman to do the grading properly. An added ad- 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 391 

vantage will be the uniformity of the different producers' goods 
when packed by one person. 

An association that will institute the central packing station 
idea can do away with the glass front case, and can pack comb 
honey in cartons, stamping the grade on the outside of the box. It 
is no more necessary to have a case of honey glassed than it is to 
have a box of apples with a glass side. There are probably from a 
half dozen to a score of places in each of the comb honey producing 
states where the packing stations could be established. Take the 
eity of Boulder as an example. There are seven honey producers 
within twelve miles of the city wdio have more than one hundred 
colonies. This year something over a car of comb honey will be 
produced and probably a car of extracted, if it was all brought to- 
gether. 

Let us take the car of comb honey. Have each producer bring 
in his comb honey in supers with the section separators removed, 
also all the bait combs. A room, preferably a store room with 
north windows, could be rented close to the railroad switch for $25 
a month. Each producer has his name or number on each super 
and each has a place in the room separate from the others to pile his 
honey. The scraping and casing tables are to be placed at the front 
of the building, close to the windows, for light. Twenty-five dollars 
will construct tables and scraping apparatus for three or four scrap- 
ers, one grader and one man or boy to nail up the cases. The grader 
should be foreman. Three women scrapers can scrape one hundred 
cases a day, if they are good workers ; and when they get their 
hand in they can run up to fifty cases each. The boy nailing ship- 
ping cases cannot go beyond seventy-five or a hundred cases a day, 
and if he cannot nail cases as fast as needed another boy can be 
secured. The grader-packer should be able to grade and pack from 
a hundred to a hundred and fifty cases a day. 

The scrapers scrape everything and the grader sorts otit all culls. 
puts them back in the owner's supers, and they are disposed of by 
the owner himself. 

Twelve hundred and fifty cases for comb honey will cost about 
3G cents each, or $200. 'We will allow two cents each for nailing up 
cases, or $25 for the 1250. I have had all my cases nailed together 
for one cent each, but we want to allow enough for all the work so 
that there will be no kickers after the central packing scheme is 
started. It will cost five cents a case to have the honey scraped 
and cleaned. AVomen and girls can earn from 75 cents to $2.50 a 
day at this work. The grading and packing is the important part, 
as the one who does this has to be in charge of the others. He 
should get five cents a case for the packing and superintending and 
can earn from $4.00 to $7.00 a day. And so we have $62.50 for 

{Continued o?i pao;e ^94-) 



392 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



THE POOREST SECTIONS THAT MAY BE PUT IN THE GRADE NAMED 



^'.^ •'■^•'^^'^''ifj 



FANCY 




NUMBER ONE 



NUMBER TWO 



HONEY QUOTATIONS 



Producers who had honey for sale undouDtedly found the market a trifle dull 
during September. This dullness is apt to cause the producer uneasiness, and the 
tendency is to shade prices under these circumstances. However, a little study will 
show the market in a normal condition. 

Jobbers who purchased heavily early in the season, naturally found the 
wholesale trade busy with the heavy movement of fruit and thus inclined to put 
oft:' the purchase of honey. Then in some cases at least the impression has gone 
forth that there is a heavy crop of honey for sale, and buyers are waiting for 
the downward price. A few who held over high priced honey from last year 
remember it, and are a little slow to buy. But when the demand for honey 
comes there is no reason why it should not move at the present prices, unless 
the producer gets scared and dumps his crop on the market at a reduced price. 
As stated in the quotations below, jobbers who purchased at a high price must 
hold at that price, and producers should not undersell, i look for a more active 
movement at unchanged prices during October. 



BOSTON — Fancy white comb honey, 16c to 
17c. No. 1 white comb honey, 15c to 16c. 
Fancy white extracted honey. 10c to lie. 
Light amber extracted honey, 9c to 10c. Am- 
ber, 8c to 9c. Wax, 30c. 

BLAKE-LEE CO., 
4 Chatham Row. 



KANSAS CITY, MO.— Receipts of both 
comb and extracted honey are still light. The 
demand for comb is good. We quote No. 1 
•white comb 24 sec, $3.50; No. 2 white comb 
24 sec, $3.25; No. 1 amber comb 24 sec, 
$3.25; No. 2 amber comb 24 sec, $3.00; ex- 
tracted white, per lb. 8 to Syic; extracted 
amber, per lb. 6 to 8c. Beeswax, per lb. 25 
to 28c. C. C. CLEMONS PRODUCE CO. 

Sept. 18. 



of fancy extracted honey in 60-lb. cans, we are 
getting 8c to 10c a lb., while amber honey in 
barrels we are selling at 5J4c to 7c, according 
to the grade and quantity purchased. There is 
plenty of beeswax and the prices are much 
easier than they have been for some time. We 
are paying 28c a lb. delivered here, for choice, 
bright, yellow beeswax. 

THE FRED W. MUIH CO., 
"The Busy Bee Men" 
Sept. 18. 204 Walnut Street. 



CINCINNATI— The demand for both ex- 
tracted and comb honey is not up to expecta- 
tions lay far for this time of the year. Big 
buyers refuse to pay the prices we must ask, 
and we fear that it will be a case of a small 
business or lower prices, and owing to the 
high prices we have paid it will be impossible 
for us to lower our price. 

We are selling strictly fancy comb honey at 
14c to lei^c a lb., according to the quantity 
and quality purchased; amber comb honey is 
not wanted at any price. What little is sold 



CHICAGO — During this month we have had 
very large sales of comb honey, the receipts 
having been taken freely, but now the stock 
is beginning to accumulate and the market is 
a little easier in tone. In fact, houses that 
are not in the habit of getting honey have 
been selling lower than quotations herein given. 

No. 1 to fancy comb honey sells at 17c to 
18c per lb., with the off grades from Ic to 3c 
per II3. less. Extracted honey is in free supply 
with the white selling at 8c to 9c per lb., with 
some small lots of fancy clover and linden 
bringing 10c per lb. The quality of honey this 
sjason is bringing in duplicate orders. Bees- 
wax is steady at from 30c to 32c per lb., ac- 
cording to color and cleanliness. 

R. K. BURNETT & CO.. 

Sept. 19. 173 W. South Water St. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



393 



CINCINNATI— The market on comb honey 
is quiet and there is not very much demand, 
this we owe to the hot weather for this time 
of the year and the large fruit crop. For 
No. 1 white comb honey in a wholesale way 
we are getting 155<2 cents per pound. There is 
no demand for off grade comb honey. 

The demand for extracted is fair, white sell- 
ing at 914 cents in 60-pound cans, light amber 
in 60-pound cans is selling at 8 cents. Bees- 
wax fair demand at $33.00 per hundred. The 
above are our selling prices not what we are 
paving. C. H. WEBER & CO., 

Sept. 17. 2146-47 Central Ave. 



For Sale. — 50 to 300 colonies, 8-frame, good 
condition. E. F. Atw.\ter, Meridian, Idaho. 



NEW YORK — Comb honey is now arriving 
right along with a fair demand for all grades 
at unchanged prices. The reason for buck- 
wheat being late this year there is none on 
the market yet to speak of. From the reports 
we are receiving from producers there will be 
a rather light crop; however the demand for 
buckwheat comb honey being limited we do 
not think that higher prices will rule than 
from 10c to l"2c per pound, according to qual- 
ity. Extracted is in fair demand for all grades 
at unchanged prices. 

Sept. 23. HILDRETH & SEGELKEN. 



O 



Classified Department. 

Notices will be i>iserted in this depart- 
ment at ten cents per line. Minimum 
charge will be twenty-five cents. Copy 
should be sent early, and may be for any- 
thing the bee-keeper has for sale or wants 
to buy. Be sure and say you want your 
advertisement in this department. 



BEES AND QTTEEZrS. 



Golden Itallan Queens, Nuclei, and full 
colonies. See price-list in May Review, page 
197. Isaac F. Tillinghast, Factoryville, Pa. 

A Limited Number of Leather Colored Ital- 
ian Queens for Sale. Warranted purely mated, 
$1..50. Geo. B. Howe, Black River, N. Y. 

Front Line Italian Queens by return mail 
at 7.5c each, 6, $4.25; 12, $8.00; 25 and up, 
60c each. J. B. Hollopeter, Pentz, Pa. 

For S.\le — 20 fine colonies of bees, supplies, 
and quantity of old bee magazines. Edwin 
EwELL, Litchfield, Mich. 

For Sale. — 150 swarms of bees in good 
shape. No disease. Mostly in 10-frame hives. 
A bargain if all are taken. S. A. Fuller, 
Helena, Ark. 

Golden Italian Queens — Untested, war- 
ranted $1.00 each; six for $4.50; twelve for 
$8.00. Good report^ wh°v» trier! for Black 
brood. J. B. Case, Port Orange, Fla. 

Golden Italian Queens that produce golden 
bees, the brightest kind. Gentle, and as good 
honey gatherers as can be found. Each $1, 
six $5; tested $2. 

J. B. Brockwell, Barnetts, Va. 



Why Not Re-Queen your bees this fall? 
Our beautiful golden Italian queens will give 
you great pleasure, as well as profit. Only 
one dollar each, or nine dollars a dozen, un- 
tested. They are beauties. C. W. Phelps & 
Son, Binghamton, N. Y. 

For Sale. — About 150 colonies of bees. 
Root and Moore strain. Also 50 colonies 
dark hybrids. All in L hives. No disease. 
Will sell all or any part of them. Write for 
prices. Satisfaction or money back. Wilmer 
Cl.\rk, Box 397, Earlville, Mad. Co., N. Y. 

Carniolan Queens. — Bred from best im- 
ported stock. JNIany colonies can be manip- 
ulated without the use of smoke or veil. Un- 
tested, one for $.75, six for $4.25, twelve for 
$8.00. Tested, one for $1.00, six for $5.00, 
twelve for $10.00. William Kernan, Dushore, 
Pa., R. D. 2. 

Golden Queens. — Very gentle, very hardy, 
and great surplus gatherers. Untested, golden 
to tip queens, that should produce golden to tip 
workers, $1.00; select tested, $3.00; also nuclei 
and full colonies. Send for circular and price 
list to Geo. M. Steele, 30 S. 40th St., Phila- 
delphia, Penna. 

If you wish the best of untested three- 
banded Italian queens send us your orders — 
75 cents each, $8.00 per dozen. Safe arrival 
and satisfaction. No order too small nor too 
large to receive our prompt attention. Thb 
Golden Rule Bee Co., Rt. 1, Box 103, River- 
side, Cal. 



HONE7 AND WAX. 



For Sale. — White clover comb and ex- 
tracted honey. Henry Hettel, Marine, 111. 

Wanted. — Comb, extracted honey, and bees- 
wax. R. A. Burnett & Co., 

173 W. S. Water St., Chicago. 

Wanted — Glassed comb and clover extract- 
ed honey and beeswax. John O. Buseman, 
2828 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wanted. — White or very light amber ex- 
tracted or comb honey at once. O. N. B.\ld- 
wiN, Baxter Springs, Kans. 

We call on a large number of retail grocers 
each week, and can place your surpus honey. 
Write The New Idea Co., 545 Orange St., 
Newark, N. J. 

Honey For Sale — In 60-lb. cans, 2 in a 
case. White, Sc: Amber, lyic; Buckwheat, 7c, 
f. o. b. here. Sample, 10c. Robert Conn, 
Roaring Branch, Pa. 

For Sale — Finest quality white clover and 
basswood honey, blended in extractor. Put up 
in brand new 60-lb. cans, two cans per case, 
at 10c per lb. by case of two cans, or more, 
F. O. B. Flint. Cash with order. L. S. 
Griggs, 711 Avont St., Flint, Mich. 



394 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



Wanted. — White honey, both comb and ex- 
tracted. Write us before disposing of your 
crop. HiLDRETH & Segelken, 265 Greenwich 
St., New York. 

Fancy No. 1, white clover honey in i]4 x VA 
and 4x5 plain sections, in no-drip shipping 
cases holding 24 sections each. Per case or 
carrier of 8 cases at 15c per section. R. D. 
Gilbert, White Bear Lake, Minn. 

Extracted Honey of the finest quality — 
thick well ripened, flavor simply delicious. 
White clover and sweet clover blend. Price 
9c per pound in bright new 60 lb. cans. Sam- 
ple free. J. P. Moore, Morgan, Ky. 

A VERY fine quality of white extracted 
honey for table use, in new 60-lb. tin cans. 
Raspberry or Basswood flavors. Say how much 
you can use and we will be pleased to quote 
our prices. Sample free for a 4c stamp to pay 
the postage. E. D. Townsend & Sons, North- 
star, Mich. 



nished on anything in cans; give quantity 
wanted. Large contracts enable us to make 
low prices. A. G. Woodman Co., Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich. 

Aluminum Hive Numbers (I'g-in. high) 2c 
each Fig. 50 or more l^c. Postpaid, inch 
brass nails. Henry Benke, Pleasantville Sta., 
N. Y. 

Watch for Dr. Chas. G. Schamu's adver- 
tisement in November issue. Sold out now. 
A new announcement then. 

Special Offers in Bee Literature, etc. 
Good locations for bees in new and unoccu- 
pied territory. Send for free circular. 
George W. York, Sandpoint, Idaho. 

For Sale. — A full line of bee-keepers' sup- 
plies; also Italian bees and honey a specialty. 
Write for catalog and particulars. 

The Penn Co., Penn, Miss. 

(Successor to J. M. Jenkins.) 



In Florida. — Root supplies. Save transpor- 
tation. Free catalog. G. F. Stanton, Buck- 
ingham, Fla. 

Bronzed Honey L.\bels. — 250, 50c; 500, 80c; 
1,000, $1.10 P. P. Send 2c stamp for samples. 
Pearl Card Co., Clintonville, Ct. 

For Sale. — New 60-lb. cans, two in a case, 
lots of 10 cases, 60c each; 25 cases, 59c each. 
50 cases 58c each, 100 cases 5rc each, F. 
O. B. factory in O. or 111. Quotations fur- 



xeajm estate. 

For Sale — One 20-acre farm and 130 swarms 
of bees in Wisconsin's best land and honey 
locality. Lewis Francisco, Mosinee, Wis. 

FOUI^TS-Sr. 

Pigeons! Pigeons!— Thousands in all leading 
varieties at lowest prices. Squab-breeding stock 
Dur specialty; 17 years' experience. Illustrated 
matter free. Providence Squab Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 



PROTECTION HIVE 

The best and lowest priced double wall hive on the market. This hive has % mate- 
rial in the outer wall, and is not cheaply constructed of H material as some other hives 
on the market. Packing or dead air spaced as you prefer. Remember winter is approach- 
ing. Get your bees into comfortable quarters before it is here. Send for a catalogue. 
/^. G. WOODMAN CO.. Grand Rapids. Mich. 



The Central Comb-Honey Packing Station. 

{Continued /row page jgi) 
.scraping a car of honey and $62.50 for grading- and packing. The 
total expense, including shipping cases, will be about $400 for a car 
of 1250 cases, or 32 cents a case. Do you not think that is cheap 
for having the work done right and the whole car graded uniformly 
in uniform cases by one grader? 

This estimate was made with glassed cases in mind, but with 
this method of grading and packing the glassed case has no advant- 
age. An all-wood case can be had for half the price. Packing 
boxes for two dozen cans of corn, tomatoes, etc., cost from eight to 
ten cents each. Why should honey cases cost more? The central 
packing station is going to come very soon, for it is needed 
badly.— W. F. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



395 



Red Clover and 
Golden Queens at 



50 



300 tested Red Clover and 

Golden Queens at 50c 

each after Oct. 1. 

EVANSVILLE BEE & 
HONEY CO. 

Evansville, - . - - Ind. 



SECTIONS 

^ We make a specialty of 
manufadturing Sedions. 
^ Prompt shipments on all 
Bee-Keepers' supplies. 
CATALOGUE FREE 

AUG. LOTZ & CO. 

BOYD, WISCONSIN 



"Grig'g's Saves you Freiaflit." 

TOLEDO 

Is the best shipping center for your 
honey crop. We handle vast quantities 
of 

Comb and Extracted Honey 

Write us what you have: will buy 
any quantity if price is right, or will 
handle on a commission. Also want to 
correspond with shippers of Potatoes, 
Apples, and other Produce. 

S. J. GRIGGS & CO. 

26 N. Erie St. 



QUEENS OF 

MOORE'S STRAIN 

OF ITALIANS 

PRODUCE WORKERS 

That -fill ttie supers quick 
With honey nice and thick. 



They have won a world-wide rep- 
utation for honey-gathering-, hard- 
iness gentleness, etc. 

Untested queens, ?1.00; six, 
$5.00; 12, $9.00. 

Select untested, $1.25; six, $6.00 
12, $11.00. 

Safe arrival and satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

Circular free. 



J. P. MOORE 

Queen Breeder, 
Route 1, Morgan, Ky. 



WHITE SWEET CLOVER 
SEED 

We have been requested to furnish our 
members with white sweet clover seed, and we 
are just arranging with parties in Colorado to 
furnish us with what our members want. The 
need of getting this ssed from good reliable 
sources is apparent, and we are pleased to 
assure you that the parties who are furnishing 
it are absolutely reliable, and will furnish the 
best seed obtainable. Orders will be taken for 
not less than 10 pounds, at 15c per pound. 
Transportation charges will have to be paid by 
the purchaser. State how you want it shipped 
when sending in your order. 

THE NATIONAL BEE-KEEPERS' ASSN. 

230 Woodland Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

THE 



CHAS. ISRAEL & BROS. SWARTHMORE APIARIES 



488-490 Canal St,. New York 

Wholesale Dealers and Commission Merchants 

in 

Honey, BeesT»-ax, Maple Sugar nnd 

Syrup, Etc. 

Consignments solicited. Established 1875. 



The late E. L. Pratt's Celebrated Gentle 

GOLDEN ALL OVER QUEENS 

PEOIGREEO 

PENN G. SNYDER, State Apiary Inspector 
SWARTHMORE, PA. 



396 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 




"If goods are wantpri quick, send to Pouder." 

BEE SUPPLIES 

Standard hives with latest improvements. Danzen- 
baker Hives, Sections. Foundation. Extractors, 
Smokers, in fact everything used about the bees. 
My equipment, my stock of goods, the quality of 
my goods and my shipping facilities cannot be 

PAPER HONEY JARS (Sample Mailed Free) 

For extracted honey. Made of heavy paper and 
paraffine coated, with tight seal. Every honey 
producer will be interested. A descriptive circular 
free. Finest white clover honey on hand at all 
times. I buy beeswax. Catalog of supplies free. 

WALTER S. POUDER, Indianapolis.lnd. 

859 Massachusetts Avenue. 



This is the only place 
in Indiana where you 
can get Lewis Beeware, 
Dadant's Foundation, 
Bingham Smokers, and 
Prompt Shipment. 

Indianapolis is the greatest inland 
railroad center in the world, both steam 
and interurban. This helps us to give 
better service in receiving and shipping 
to all points. Orders are shipped same 
day received and no order is too small 
to receive prompt attention. 

Wanted: Comb and Extracted Honey, 
Beeswax. Catalog free. 



The C. M. Scott Co, 

1004 E. Wasliiugton St., 
INSIANAPOIiIS, INDIANA. 



SATISFACTORY 

RESULTS 

Will be obtained by using MANU- 
FACTURED COMB FOUNDATION, 
which embodies PURITY, TOUGH- 
NESS, TRANSPARENCY, COLOR and 
the PURE BEES WAX ODOR of the 
NATURAL COMB as made by the 
HONEY BEE. 

SUCH IS THE 

DITTMER PROCESS 
COMB FOUNDATION 

Send for Samples. 

All other Bee Keepers' Supplies at 
prices you will appreciate. We will be 
pleased to send you our 1912 Catalog, 
for the asking. 

Gus Dittmer Co. 

Augusta, Wisconsin. 




Make Your Own Hives 

Bee Keepers will save money by using our Foot 



Power 



SAWS 



in making their hives, sections and boxes. 
Machine on trial. Send for Catalogue 

W. F. & JNO. BARNES CO. 



384 Ruby Street, 



Rockford, Illinois. 



THE BEE-KEEPERS' REVIEW 



397 



Learn Beekeepi